Winnipeg Free Press Newspaper Archives Apr 18 2015, Page 48

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Winnipeg Free Press (Newspaper) - April 18, 2015, Winnipeg, Manitoba C M Y K PAGE B11 winnipegfreepress. com BUSINESS WINNIPEG FREE PRESS, SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 2015 B 11 “ Experience the Essence of Service” John Chand 204- 781- 7737 www. johnchand. realtor DENIED BENEFITS BY YOUR DISABILITY INSURER? .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 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Spots are limited – to reserve call Linda at ( 204) 944- 3261 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 204.944.8777 TapperCuddy. com 774- 4444 WWW. WINNIPEGDODGE. 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O B O OBO OBO OBO OBO OBO OBO OBO 2 B RAN D BRAND NEW NEW . . $ 18 , 995 * O R $ 99 B/ W * 2015 RAM 1500 B RAN D BRAND NEW NEW G RAIN bags, those long, white, blobs of plastic you see adorning farmers’ fields these days, may not be as aesthetically pleasing on the horizon as the rapidly disappearing grain elevators. But you could argue they are as symbolic of 21stcentury grain storage as those Prairie icons were of the past. Bags have been showing up with increasing frequency as a cost- effective solution to temporary storage needs when the size of the crop exceeds the available bin storage. Unlike the U. S., where, thanks to government subsidies, about half the grain and oilseed crop can fit into commercial storage, Canada’s commercial grain handling has evolved to be all about throughput and “ just- intime” delivery. Only about one- eighth of Canada’s crop will fit into commercial storage. So most storage is on the farm, which means farmers are the ones in charge of keeping it in good condition until it gets pulled forward for delivery. In a year such as 2014, that’s a challenge. Exports of the record- setting 2013 crop were delayed due to a sluggish rail transportation system, which meant farmers went into harvest last fall with more grain still in their bins than usual. It was a scramble to find storage, and the bags do a better job of keeping it from spoiling than piling it outside on the ground. Provided the grain was dry and in good condition when put into the bag, and the birds or rodents or weather don’t break the seal, farmers buy themselves several months to either sell the grain or put it into more permanent storage. But that creates another problem — what to do with the single- use bag when the grain is removed? One 76- metre bag contains around 136 kilograms of plastic that can’t be left on the field. Grain bags are not the only plastic that’s cluttering up Manitoba farmyards and fields. There are silage covers, bale wraps, plastic twine used to bind hay and straw bales, plus all sorts of feed and seed bags. A 2011 study into agricultural waste by CleanFarms Inc., a manufacturing industry- funded recycling organization, estimated there are 6,000 tonnes of plastic waste generated on Manitoba farms annually that could be eligible for recycling. The study found less than 20 per cent of that waste — most of it packaging — was taken to landfills. Up to two- thirds was disposed of on the farm through burning. “ It appears that a broadly based, wide- spectrum disposal program is urgently needed,” the study concluded. CleanFarms, which received an environmental sustainability award from the province this year, has made solid progress over the past 25 years getting pesticide containers and obsolete pesticides out of the environment. As a result of its programs, 600,000 empty plastic jugs and pails were delivered to Manitoba landfills in 2013. The most recent obsolete- pesticide collection program in 2012 brought in 75,000 kg of product that was collected and safely disposed. Now it’s turning its attention to other plastics such as the grain bags, twines and silage covers. Working with Green Manitoba, a provincial government recycling program, the program is operating a pilot project this year to collect agricultural plastics at six sites scattered across the province. Tammy Myers, a Saskatchewan consultant brought in to help the program here get started, said initial interest among farmers has been high, although efforts to get grain bags off their fields in March was hampered by frozen conditions. The grain- bag recycling experience in western provinces suggests the recycling option has to be convenient, accessible and affordable. Rolling up the bags is easier with a “ grain- bag roller” developed by a Saskatchewan entrepreneur. But those sell for about $ 8,000 apiece, which doesn’t make sense for a farmer dealing with less than 40 bags a year. So some municipalities are buying one and lending it out. Like with any recycling program, the biggest challenge is getting farmers to embrace the concept — and that takes lots of encouragement and a little bit of time. “ My biggest competitor is a Bic lighter,” she said. Laura Rance is editor of the Manitoba Co- operator. She can be reached at laura@ fbcpublishing. com When grain’s gone, what to do with the bags? RURAL REVIVAL LAURA RANCE SUBMITTED PHOTO Grain bags are a cost- effective solution to temporary storage needs, but they also pose the question of what to do with them once they’ve been emptied. Any Child. Any Need. Every Day. Call ( 204) 982- 1050 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. varietymanitoba. com DONATE .. .. .. .. .. With your donation you give a child... a childhood. B_ 11_ Apr- 18- 15_ FP_ 01. indd B11 4/ 17/ 15 4: 53: 49 PM

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