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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 18, 1974, Lethbridge, Alberta 42 THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD Wednesday, September Trout farming business good MOOSE JAW (CP) Five years ago a Moose Jaw family started trout farming as a hobby. Now the hobby has be- come a thriving business serv- ing Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. Trout Leader Distributors, with offices in Moose Jaw and Edmonton, provide trout fingerhngs for fish farmers and sportsmen in Western Canada. The business, operated as a company for the first time this year, started out as a hobby for William Walsen of Moose Jaw. Today his sons Gerald and Ray run the com- pany. It's a seasonal operation, selling fingerlings only during the spring They are purchas- ed from a source in Wisconsin, stored and resold. The company receives loads of 125.000 fingerlings at a time and during the term of oper- ation sells several hundred thousand fish While stored, the fingerlings are kept in fish-raising troughs with water con- tinuously flowing through. Then they are transferred to 60-foot-square containers with water temperature the same as in a pond. Oxygen is added to the containers. Most of the customers are farmers who seed their ponds or store the fingerlings in pools. The fish can be caught or harvested for the winter. The company drops off the fish at specific points in bulk containers. They sell for about per 100, with each customer purchasing an average of 200 to 300. Company officials are ready to go out to fish farms to assist farmers with any problems they have in raising the fish They also sell harvesting equipment and show farmers how to operate it. Fish farmers have to have a permit before the company can sell them any fish. The permit is free to anyone doing private farming but costs for commercial production. JSJT Sears The skates that scored with Rerre R'lote and the rest of our team. Sears Sports Advisory Council-approved. Sale-priced for 3 days only 32 98 Reg. Padded tendon guard The only skate with Sears Sports Advisory Council approval. Precision-made by to meet the demands of rugged action! Tough Brown uppers of water-resistant nylon have the strength and durability of then some! Lined with kip leather for comfort and extra protection. Molded toe of shock- resistant plastic. FuJI-grain Brown leather trim. Boys" sizes 1-5. 066 213 361 Save on men's skates. Full, half sizes 6-12 066 216 361. Reg. Pierre expert on skates and hockey equipment. A member of Sears Sports Advisory Council Fully lined with kip leather Top grain leather Shock-resistant plastic toe Cut-resistant nylon quarters Moisture-resistant plastic sole SttPSONS-SEABS SPOWIS AWSORT OOUNCL this is __ best value Chrome-plated imncJus blade Available Trom coast jo ooay in Canada Through all Simpsons Sears stores.. This vprv special is The smoerBSt effofl Simpsons Seers can mafce Jo bring you Thai combines fine quality with The lowest possible Enjoy 1 now' Use your All Purpose Account At Simpsons-Sears you gel the finest guarantee Satisfaction or money refunded. Simpsons-Sears Ltd. Store Hours: Open Daily a.m. to p.m. Thursday and Friday a.m. to p.n Centre Village Mall. Telephone 328-9231 Transit system prototype This artist's concept superimposed on a photo- Toronto. McDonnell Douglas Corp announced it graph shows how an advanced urban transporta- soon will begin working on the system which will tion system now under development in West Ger- have small electromagnetically controlled vehides many would look if a planned prototype is built in running on an elevated track Veh'C'eS Texas capital of illegal dogfight ing New York Times Service DALLAS if it can be said that there is a capital of dog fighting, the illegal, usually organized, gamblers' game that is growing from coast to coast, then it is probably in Texas. On any given weekend, up to a dozen fights might be held in and around Dallas, Austin, San Antonio or at other well- guarded locations elsewhere in the state. A clandestine dogfighters' magazine, Pit Dog Reports with a secret mailing list, is published near Dallas, several big pit dog breeders live in the state, and some of the biggest matches called "conventions" are held here, an inquiry by the New York Times has found. Moreover, dogfighting here, as well as in some other areas, is not simply the weekend diversion of a handful of men with their own special idea of sport. There is high stakes gambling, prostitution, illegal liquor sales, suggestions of drug sales and allegations by a participant of payoffs to the rural police for protection. Gangland-type slayings Violence is not uncommon; many spectators at fights carry pistols, and there have been two gangland-style assassinations of well-known dogfighters within the last year. "If you consider the general level of fighting itself, the number of fights, the number of breeders, the level of peripheral activities such as prostitution, then Texas would probably be No. said to Duncan Wright, executive director of the American Dog Owners Association, which has been investigating dog fighting "Moreover." Wright added, "it would probably be the focal point of this kind of activity across the entire southwestern United States." Frank McMahon, chief investigator for the Humane Society of the United States, agrees that the state is an important link in a nationwide network of dogfighters and gamblers. McMahon visited Texas recently to look into the situation. In Massachusetts. Don Lambert of the State Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, noted that an investigation in the Boston area that led to the arrest and conviction of two important dogfighters had turned up evidence of close links to Texas breeders and fighters. Despite this, the majority of law enforcement officials here seem for the most part unaware of the extent of dogfighting and related illegal activity, or not particularly interested At the moment, according to several confidential sources, dogfighting has slackened considerably because of recent public exposure of the activity and because of police interest in the two slayings. j Two bodies found The bodies of the two men were found last Dec 30 on the bank of the Trinity River outside Dallas in the town of Farmers Branch. Their hands were tied behind their backs, and both had been shot through the head. The two, Lewis Richard Halliburton and William Marshall Reed, had appeared prominently in two underground dogfighting publications, the Texas Pit Dog Reports, and Pit Dogs, published in Florida. According to the police, the two men were last seen attending a cockfight in Farmers Branch the night before their bodies were found. Their hands had been tied with neckties taken from the house where the fight was held Many of the participants in dogfighting are also involved in cockfighting. Sources gave two reasons for the killings. One version holds that the two men were killed because they had stolen someone else's fighting dog; another that one or both had provided information about a dogfight that was raided. Yet another account, given to the police by a prominent dogfighter. was that the men were involved in a hijacking unrelated to the fights and were killed in a squabble over the proceeds. In any case, although some matches or conventions are family affairs, with men, women and children present amid something of a carnival atmosphere, participants say that others are settings for barely subdued violence. A young Austin man who had been involved in fighting until his winning dog was mysteriously shot to death said that quarrels were common and he had been present at a fight at which there had been a shooting. Russian hero badges getting out of hand MOSCOW