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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 18, 1973, Lethbridge, Alberta 8 THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD Tuetday, September 18, 1973 Your horoscope By Jeane Dixon WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 19 Your birthday today: This is the year in which you learn to mind your own business, literally as well as figuratively. Ever so many projects are available to get into; ever so few are within your personal range of talents. Don't expect friends to work things out for you. Relationships other than dependency, however, .evolve quite satisfactorily. Today's natives have an abiding interest in literary works, may be writers as well. ARIES {March 21 April Being gracious as you work against today's currents is difficult but very rewar- ding, both in self-esteem and later material gains. Evening hours take a quite different turn. TAURUS (April 20 May Being touchy or hasty today isn't what you should do. tempting as it is to get a things said. In family situations, you are not likely to get your own way. GEMIVI (May 21 June Be receptive to new ideas and methods. Your home may neeu some rearranging. In family life, almost anything can come to pass now. Con- ducting "post mortems" is useless CANCER (June 21 July Improvised schedules work better than long-set plans. But you still need to check to see that essentials are available. There's much comment you needn't answer. LEO (July 23 Aug. Whatever you have been over- doing now comes to some reaction-crisis. Being open- handed doesn't necessarily appease everybody. See what thev reallv want, and what vou get in return. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. Be gentle as you decline an un- feasible suggestion the relationship is more than a transaction. You are on your own if you involve yourself in any conflict of opinions. LIBRA (Sept. 23 Oct. Coincidence, so-called, pops out of nowhere. You'll be proud of having the resilience to sustain the stress of a day in which it seems anything you do is wrong. SCORPIO (Oct. 22 Nov. If there is an old hindrance you need to shed. this is the time to do it. Some of the clashing circumstances of the day are results of deeds of long ago, since forgotten. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 Dec. Those who generally compete against you seem friendly, while your own close associates upset your schemes. What you do yourself is at least known to be done right. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 Jan. Rely on confirmed assets for this complex but not dif- ficult day. Relationships are the critical factor. Friends are inclined to tell wild stories believe nothing. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 Feb. Exert extra energy to get routines rolling and on the proper track. Where others become impatient, see that your response is not of the same sort. Concentration is essential. PISCES (Feb. 19 March Home conditions tend to take your attention, to the ex- clusion of important business details. Make sure you are not making others' decisions the price is too high if you do. (1973, The Chicago Tribune) Ask Andy FLYING FOX Andy sends a complete 20- volume set of the Merit Students Encyclopedia to Jerry Dubowe, age 11. of Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, for his question: Is the flying fox a mammal? Swoosh! Is it a Flying Saucer. Count Dracula or a Big Black Kite with a five-foot, wingspread? Calm down, it's just a flying fox on his way to a late supper in the nearest orchard. Behind him comes a squadron of his friends and relatives, flapping their leathery wings against the starry sky. They are more scared of you than you should be of them. Of the 1.000 or so bat species, about 60 are called flying foxes. Though they have foxy faces and bodies covered with foxy fur. they are genuine bats and the bats, of course, are genuine mam- mals. They also are the only mammals that fly on flap- pable wings. Their wings are leathery skin stretched from their sides, over their legs and the elongated bones of their arms and fingers. The thumb joint on each wing extends to form a handy claw. The flying foxes live in In- dia, the peninsulas and islands around southeast Asia, the coastal regions of Australia and on a few islands in the In- dian Ocean. Though classed as fruit-eating bats, they eat a lot of flowers and many like to gorge themselves on delicate sprays of fragrant mimosa. Where tropical trees abound, hundreds of thousands of them live in colonies. All of them are large bats. The giant has a body a foot long and wings that can be spread five feet wide. Like most flying foxes, he wears foxy red fur on his head and body. His leathery wings are black. His foxy face has a long pointed nose, large bright eyes and pointed ears. Around his neck is a shaggy ruff of orange-red fur. From dawn until dusk, the colony roosts in a grove of tall trees, preferably above a swamp. There they hang up- side down by one or both back feet, with wings folded around their bodies. Soon after sunset, the sleeping bats begin to stir. Wings unfold and squadrons take off for the nearest food supply. Sometimes, like thieves in the night, they descend on 111 ABNEJ orchards and dine on cultivated apples, plums and pears. They ignore bananas and other produce that usually is picked and sent to market in the unripe stage. Flying foxes select only fully ripe fruit. And naturalists say that they prefer the tangy taste of wild fruits. When possible, they dine on wild figs, paw-paws, various berries and assorted blossoms. Since time began, flying fox- es have been hunted as human food. It is said that their meat is tender and has a delicate flavor somewhere between chicken and rabbit. Many ingenious ways have been invented to catch them. For example, the Australian Aborigines light smudge pots under their roosts. When the smoke dazes the dozing bats, they are bashed down with boomerangs. Fun with figures By J. A. H. HUNTER This could be heady stuff! Kach distinct letter in the addition stands for a pai ticular but different digit. What do you make of our WINK': WOW wow NEW WINE (Answer tomorrow) Yesterday's answer: Months July to January inclusive. Flashback By THE CANADIAN PRESS Sept. 18, 1973 The French surrendered to British forces in the wake of the Battle of the Plains of Abraham 214 years ago today in 1759. Both the French commander, the Marquis de Montcalm and the British chief. Gen. James Wolfe, were killed in the fighting. Lawrence Lamb M.D. by charles schulz Dear Dr. Lamb Can you please tell me what "toxic goiter" means? I am not sure that this is what I have, but I am going in for tests soon. I don't know anything about the thyroid. Does this condition always require an operation? I have heard of so many wom- en who are taking thyroid pills and they take them regularly. They tell me that I can't stay on my pills indefinitely. I am taking Tapazole. Dear Reader The term goiter means a growth of, or increased size of, the thyroid. It can be caused in many different ways. Commonly it is caused by an accumulation within the gland of the material that the thyroid produces. The goiter may not cause any disturbance in the function of the thyroid in many individuals. It may gradually increase in size in time, and eventually become so large that for various reasons the patient may wish to have it removed. These goiters can result from iodine deficiency, a problem that's less likely to occur in our modern society. Some goiters are associated with overactivity of the thyroid gland, producing an excess amount of thyroid hor- mone. You can have an over- active thyroid without a goiter. The result is the same. Too much thyroid hormone stimulates the cells to burn food more rapidly than usual. This requires more oxygen to metabolize the food. The heart has to work harder to deliver the oxygen, which results in a fast heart rate. Since the food is burned rapidly, such individuals com- monly eat lots of food without getting fat. The hair is fine, there may be a moist, sweaty skin and excess nervousness. Often these individuals have overactive bowels, and, in general, all of their functions are speeded up. It can also be associated with excessive emotion lability, and, in its ex- treme form, can be associated with severe mental problems. These problems are usually corrected as soon as the thyroid condition is nor- malized. An overactive thvroid does not always require an oper- tion. The medicine you are taking is meant to slow down your overactive thyroid. This protects you against some of the problems I just men- tioned. It has some side effects, and, for this reason, doctors like to determine just how much a person should take. Often, if there is an overactive thyroid with the goiter, doctors feel that sur- gery is indicated. This removes part of the overac- tive tissue and helps to relieve the condition. Each case has to be reviewed on its own merits to decide what's to be done in this regard. The kind of thyroid that most people take is replacement of the thyroid gland's normal hormone, presumably for an underac- tive thyroid or hypothyroidism. I suspect that many people taking thyroid don't need it. This is a natural outcome of two hum- an traits. People who have a variety of vague symptoms like to feel that something is being done about their problem. Quite humanly, doctors like to feel that they are doing something for their patients and feel an urge to do something, even if nothing is required. This means that some doctors are prone to prescribe pills because of the compulsion to do something for their patients (none of these remarks apply to your case which is entirely Fortunately small doses of thyroid tasblet are not usually harmful in people with normal thyroid function. The thyroid gland just quits putting out as much hormone as it ordinarily does and everything pretty well equalizes itself. (Newspaper Enterprise Assn.) Send your questions to Dr. Lamb, in care of this new- spaper. P.O. Box 1551, Radio City Station, New York, N.Y. 10019. For a copy of Dr. Lamb's new booklet on diver- ticulosis, send 50 cents to the same address and ask for booklet. GOREN ON BRIDGE BY EAST 4k A75 Q 10 5 3 0 Q85 4- 10 73 East Pass Pass CHARLES H. GOREN (if 1773, The Chicago Both vulnerable. South deals. NORTH A J63 V K J 92 092 J984 WEST K 10 8 4 64 0 K64 SOUTH 4k Q92