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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 16, 1971, Lethbridge, Alberta 22 THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD Thunday, Sipttmbtr 16, 1971- For The Record By MARILYN ANDERSON Family Editor JUDGING by the reaction to a suggestion made in this column Saturday that as many people who want to run for aldennanic candidacy should be given every support, apathy is not going to be riding herd on the Oct. 13 civic election. There's been considerable concern expressed that not only enough people run, but that a cross section of the populace be given a showing. There's once again a lack of women candidates according to the list of nominations. There must be women in the community as capable of filling these posts as the male nominees but it isn't necessary to have a woman. Anyone who is really capable will be in the run- ning without a lot of coaxing. The age of the candidates is another area of con- cern. While it's true that candidates retired from business life will have more time to attend meetings and answer phone calls, and attend banquets, they also need to be in touch with the changes which are occurring in (he city. Being familiar with the city and its policies and its needs of 20 years ago isn't necessarily a qualifica- tion to handle today's problems. Another contentious issue is whether there is a balanced viewpoint given the city from the number businessmen and professionals who frequent city council. One woman caller said that she knew of one or two non professionals who would be interested in running for aldermanlc posts, but they could not get the necessary time off work for meetings. A few commissions meet during the day, as is the case with the Municipal Planning Commission, but commissions can be scheduled to the convenience of its members. Aside from that situation, it seems inconceivable that an employer would not be willing to make allow- ances for an employee on staff who is working for the benefit of the community. Certainly no one is going to take advantage of the situation, if only to keep the lines of communication open with his or her fellow workers. There are 15 candidates for alderman, not nearly enough for public school board, although chances are it will be a strong one in any case; and even a mayoralty contest. It's an interesting combination of factors: youth, one woman, business, retired, labor, professional and non-professional in the aldermanic race. But in order to avoid voting for, or against, any one of these factors, a good campaign is essential. There are enough issues in the city to keep candi- dates in material from now until Christmas. Let's not have another Alberta rerun where everyone spout- ed party lines and really had none of their own. In a civic election, the candidates are in their own turf, and while there is a lot to learn after an election, there should be some homework done before Oct. 13 if anyone really wants to win. The incumbents will be known by what they have supported, or not supported, in the past two or four years. It's up to the initiative of the new candidates to let the people know who they are, what they stand for and why they feel so strongy about it they even want the job. JACKPOT BINGO This Thursday Evening, September 16th STARTS P.M. SHARP-PARISH HALL CORNER 12lh STREET B AND 7th AVENUE NORTH Jackpot Storti at and li Won Every Thursday 5th-7 No. Jackpot S38 Pot 'o Geld SIS 251 PER CARD OR 5 FOR Sl.OO ALSO FREE CARDS, FREE GAMES AND A DOOR PRIZE Persons under 16 yean not allowed Sponsored by Ladies' Aid of St. Piter and St. Paul's Church Sexual contacts should he checked Gonorrhea rate doubles By GLENNIS ZILM BANFF, AHa. (CP) Most women who have gonorrhea show no symptoms o[ Uie vener- eal disease and often continue to pass on the infection unknow- ingly, an otficial of the national health and welfare department said hrre. Dr. E. Acres of the depart- ment's epidemiology division told the College of Family Physi- cians that this was one of the reasons why gonorrhea is "out of control." This was also a reason why case finding and the notification of contacts was still an impor- tant part of the effort to control the disease. Dr. Acres said his statistics showed that the number of cases of gonorrhea reported for 1970 is double the number in 1960. "Of cases newly diagnosed in his report said, "approxi- mately 17 per cent wore teen- agers between 15 and 19 years of age." However, the highesl iiracl- ence of gonorrhea remained in the ago group 20 to 29. CITES FACTOKS Dr. Acres said in an interview after his address to the college's annual meeting that several fac- tors probably have contributed to the increase in gonorrhea. These would include increas- ing sexual permissiveness that may accompany the use of birth control pills or intrauterine da- viccs, greater freedom for young people, more mobility among young people and a rela- tively greater proportion of pop- ulation in the affected age groups. There has not been any In- crease in the incidence of sy- philis during the last 15 years, but the rate has not gone down to the low levels of the early ISSus, Dr. Acres said. Family doctors can play an important role in case-finding, he They must also realize the importance of seeing that the sexual partners of the in- fected patient also are found and treated. Dr. Ross Ketcheson of Cal- gary told a news conference that pregnant women are not getting good ante-natal (before- birth) care. "Seventeen per cent of people in Alberta are living in the pov- erty level he said. "They never get ns good an ante-natal care because they don't see a doctor." First female pages in Senate JL O NEW LOOK FOR SENATE Elaine Robillard 20, a Carlelon Universily student, and Claire Lafleche 19, a University of Ottawa student, stand in the Senate cham- oer in Ottawa. The two are the first female pages in Ihe Senate. Coster parents mere custodians' EDMONTON (CP) Foster arents should have more voice the care and development of heir charges, a provincial com- aittee on foster child care in Mberta was told here. Several briefs submitted at a ublic hearing recommended oster parents have more of he authority of natural par- ents rather than, as stated in brief from the Alberta Asso- iation of Social Workers, "as lere custodians." One foster mother said fos- parents are on the side nes. "We have no parental pow- she said. "We have a great responsibility but we can't sign them into the hospital, for ex- ample. 'We want to feel we are their arents but we can't." The social workers' brief complained about a lack of child welfare workers. "Our association is concern- d that tte extreme shortage of rofessional staff at the region- office level and inadequate ARE YOU READY for the BOWLING SEASON? We have a good selection of bowling shoes for men and womenl Also Tote Dags for your Shoeal GREEN'S SHOES ON SIXTH STREET OPEN THURSDAY UNTIL 9 P.M. training in the welfare field represent a serious impedi- ment." The Council of Catholic Char- ities (CCC) called for improved placement proced u r e s and counselling for prospective par- ents. 'We're most concerned about the number of transfers of fos- ter homes children receive be- fore they come to the council said. It recommended the follow-up program after placement should te improved because many foster care problems oc- cur "because of the lack of con- tinued contact by the suppor- tive staff." One mother said foster par- ents slibuld be trained to cope with a child's problems before the child arrives. BLUSHING BEAUTY Cream blusher blends Into the skin so it doesn't look like added color but part of your own natural blush. UNITED MOBILE HOME DIVISION Appointment JEAN FORSYTH Sales Manager Joe Tarnava has proudly appointed Mrs. Jean Forsyth of lolhbridgn to (ho Sales Dcpt. in Mobile Homo Living. Jean hm been a resident of the cily for many years and had several cx- In business. She would bo very pleased to aj- sisl you In o home from United Motor Co. ttd. Mobile Homo Division in tha future. The oldest profession IIow could a blind girl with one arm earn a living? This was the problem facing the Unitarian Service Committee in Korea. At the suggestion of a USC social worker she is now being trained in acupunc- ture, an ancient art using needles in the cure of disease, which can be practised by the sightless. UEC headquarters is at 56 Sparks Slreet. Ot'.awa. By SUSAN BECKER OTTAWA (CP) Elaine Robillard, 20. and Claire Laf- leche, 19, this week, began their jobs as the Senate's first female pages. Wearing black velvet dresses and white blouses, the two university students fol- lowed Senate Speaker Jean- Paul Deschatelets in the tradi- tional procession of Senate of- ficials into the ornate red chamber for the first sitting after the summer recess. Shortly beforehand, the girls spoke enthusiastically in an interview about their new tasks, saying they think it is a privilege to be able to learn first-hand about Parliament. "I'm amazed I'm sitting said Elaine, an Ottawa resident who is in her third year at Carlcton University, studying French and geogra- phy. "1 think it will be very interesting work." Claire, a native of Cassel- man, Ont., who is in her sec- ond year of psychology at the University of Ottawa, said she is honored to be selected as one of the Senate's six pages. Senator Deschatelets said in an interview that the decision to hire the girls resulted from the report of the royal com- mission on the status of women, which advocated equality of opportunity in em- ployment for women. GIVEN INSTRUCTIONS "We have been asked by the government that when a va- cancy arises we give consid- eration to women applicants who have the same compet- ence as men. All departments have received these instruc- tions." As well, last June Senator Muriel Fergusson Brunswick) had asked in the Senate whether girl pages might be hired and was told this was being considered. She told the Senate Tuesday she was astonished at the NEW VON NURSE Here from Saskatoon, where she recently graduated, is Tina Friesen, RN. Miss Friesen joined the Lethbridge VON Sept. 2, when the staff was increased to three nurses from the previous two in or- der to cope with the demand for in-home nursing services in the city. prompt lighted t response and de- lighted to see the girls in the chamber. Traditionally, pages In both Senate and Commons have been male and in the Com- mons, where being a page is a full-time job, they still are. But last spring Commons Speaker Lucien Lamoureui said that if a qualified girl applied, she would be consi- dered. Ontario now uses female pages and senators in Wash- ington recently broke a 150- year tradition in allowing members to appoint girl pages. The Senate page girls, both bilingual say the page's pay will help them continue their studies and they have ar- ranged their courses so as not to conflict with normal Senate sittings. BINGO Scandinavian Hall 229 T2lh SI. "C" N. Fri., Sept. 17th at p.m. Doon Open p.m. 5 Cards for 1.00 4th, 8th and 12th Ga.lltl in 7 Numbers WORTH in 52 Humbert Sorry No On. Undlr 16 Years of Ago Allowed Sponsor.d by tht Voia Lodfl Proceeds ro Auxiliary Hospital IN LETHBRIDGE: 613 4th Avenue South Telephone 328-4214 ;