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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 21, 1912, Lethbridge, Alberta THE LETHBRIDGE DAILY HERALD Volume V. Lclhbridge, Alberta. Monday, Oelober 21, Number 265 DRY FAK MINC PROBLEMS OF AGRICULTURE AND I r m 1IV REnurmr, THF. rnsr nv rnrmr. REDUCING THE COST OF LIVING I Ho solution of tlio problems of agrlculturo and tho reduction T JL of the high cost of living IIo in the f tit ura development of tho millions of acres of-waste lamln, tho rehabilitation oC tlm worn out landH and the development ot modern scientific fanners who are practical 1) us''newsmen and who utilize those 'scientific methods which aro today bringing dry-farming into prominence before tho entire world. With upwards of three hundred mil- lion acres of wasteland on this earth capable of producing a profitable crop, there should be more farmers, better farmers and cheaper proditctH. This great qtmiuiiy of waHte hind, hcve-to- regarded as uncultivated, can largely be utilized at. a profit in some form or other, either for grains, grass- es, vegetables, fruit or forage crops. Tho first requisite is the man. He should not bo a fanner of the old school or a fanner who farms aa his I grandfather used to farm. should be a man of brain as well as brawn, more brain Is requisite totlar.- with the successful farmer than the brawn. He should be a man who will follow strictly the instructions of those stud- ents of agriculture have taught by experience, who have experimented and proven the logic of their reason, who have found out the uew agricul- ture, for it is a new agriculture, that mako grass grow where nothing has ever been known to grow, and diligence coupled with persover- and a knowledge of business management, success is assured. The farmers of today are largely the poor- est businessmen. No hanker, no mer- chant, no fruit-stand proprietor, no newsboy even would conduct a busi- MOSH with a view to success on the lines that most farmers run their farm. The losses of the majority of farmers are tremendous, the wastes exceed their profits, iu fact, often eat them out of house and home. .in the solution omic problem of the day, the high cost tot Hying ;dep'etids, .through aneasure "the comriierclal development of every nation. This solution must nec- Jpssarily bo prompt, else there will be a. revolutionary, tendency among the classes who suffer. Not alone must we consider the solving of the prob- lems of agriculture in tbe future through Increased production, larger acrerago and better farming, but we must also consider the social and the moral results, the broadening of edu- cational lines, the extension of sclcu- titic research and the general improve- mont of rural comimmiiioH ami tin- rural homo life. The father and tho mother of the growing boys and girls' must realise there is a duty before them In tho education of the young folks into a newer and higher plane of, away from the- farm, but ijion the farm, bo that farm in the scientific so, ing U not always dry-farming. It I: a profitable 'System for every farmer every farm in tho world. H is i! farm-1 growth of oats, wheat, corn, barley, alfalfa, rye, potatoes, fruit and vege- tables, and results of these ex- periments are published and dlstrlbu- By JOHN T. BURNS, Executive Secretary- Treasurer of the International Dry-Farm- Ing Congress. not farming without moisture, but H I ted without charge (o ill who aro in- is tho method by wliiuh the natural rainfall is ooiiservud' in tho soli, by which soils aro enriched and drought- east or in tho west, In the south or In resistant plants aro developed, with Iho north. the object of. saving the moisture. torested Desert lands, an a rule, recehv less than 10 Inches of raini'all, ami seldom as much up 20 inches in OHO and oftentimes the rainfall ia linlPfta fivftry-ami nr land !s if: tho yticcossful oilii- ui.u svii on UIP VMDU.I months, made to produce tho maximum liimn- j vatlou of the soil that has been hand-j in the foim ot iow nd tanning cial return and that wiUiin a very few I lud for the purpose conserving the i lias been r ictt :lly proven as the years, the hardships brought upon moisturi', the intensive operation only mt ins ot tuiseit inj this moist- bread winners of this continent by thereof, the rotation of crops and the ure of one isju ml m !ning it tho rapidly Increased cost of living adoption of Bummer fallow, it being; for the luc at phnib tnrough- and the constant social unrest, wilt necessary on finch of the dry land of J out the i tu so ibon nil nccrasfully force a revolution more morions and j tho desert, plains and prairies to reaping d Inncst Iu u 10 coai more far-reacln'ug" than any 'recorded j cultivate that a crop is assured every In the history the century. This year on one-half of the land operated, will likewise apply to the old world, thus avoiding tbe frequent and often- for with all cities increasing in times continuous crop failures diie to population At an enormous rale and successive seasons of drought, their agricultural areas not keeping pace with this growth of population, ;here must .certainly, como a time of Dry-fa rni tag practice develops the best farmers OH earth. The best for milling and baking purposes, either famine or revolt, perhaps both. and the best fruits are those raised The future of dry-fanning is al- assured. It has taken years to iring before the people its t has suiterad reactionary spells through years of drouth when the farmer took chances or did not sirict- ly follow its methods. But it lias nev- er failed to be successful when strict- ly followed in the- arid or semi-arid regions where tbe arid or se annual un precipita- tion is less than 20 inches, evaporation deducted. It has been successful where the annual precipitation, has been as low as 9. inches, it harJ aJso been successful where applied 10 ir- rigation m (that the irrigation fanners has been prone to over water his lauds, causing a deteriotion of the soil as well as reducing the value of his products. Dry-farming has come to stay and while many have resent- ed the torni, chiefly because they have carefully considered the reason for its adaptation and their personal ideas founded on, a desire to favor irri- gation because of tho profits accruing by dry-farming methods., About six-tenths of tho arth's sur- face receives an annual rainfall of less' than 20 inches, and'can be reclaimed for agricultural purposes only by ir- rigation ami dry-farming. Scientists have a perfected world's system of. irrigation will convert about one-tenth of this vast area into an incomparable fruitful garden, leav- ing about one-half of the .earth's land surface to bo reclaimed, if at all, by the methods of 'dry-fanning. The noble system of modern agri- culture lias been constructed almost wholly in countries of abundant rain- fall, and its applications are those de- manded for the agricultural develop- ment of: humid regions. Until recent- ly, irrigation was given scant attention and dry-farming, with its world wide problem of conquering one-half of the earth, was not con si tiered. The pioneers in irrigation in the western states, and particularly in Utah, the first to adopt irrigation (In through Increased valuation placed up- were not Icmg i'fi discovering on. hmcfe that are under the ditch, it s nevertheless a fixture, recognized oday by all the loading agricultural ustitutions, agricultural colleges gen- erally, and the departments of agri- culture of the United Canada, Australia, Mexico, and 'South from such parts, of (he soil' as tbe de- sert lands with n to 10 inchc'j of rain full iu o e eai i quantit, farm products, to for th trouble ami yield a prolit, scientili methods must- followed. It is no enough to turn the crust- and plan 'the ac-ad. The soil must first be alia yzed, the seed, must -be iested, and i must be planted and cultivated wit! due regard to the character of the soli the. average precipitation in the lo callty being cultivated, and the needs of tbe vauetj of bcmj, Next to the adaptation of successfu principles is the method in which they are carried out; in other .words it is the business management tha tells. The best farmer h the business far man who, tills his soil am handles his crop'with the same care fui attention to 'details. cavises ant effects that characterizes-'the success ful man at the head of a. great cow mercial institution or bauidng cstab lisliment. Farming, in the'true sense 'Is no longer mere slavery on the farm The farm is a business institution and the profession of farming Is as respec- table as any phaye'of fact, upon the farmer depends the manufacturer, the jobber, the chant, banker and br'oker. He is the source of supply. The farmer must, like the merchant, study elements of Africa. Is the science of ag- riculUFny as Ippliecl to -farming oper- ations in regions limited or uncer- tain rainfall: It is a mistaken idea to suppose its principles are only applic- able to arid or semi-arid countries, While they am necessarily more need- ed In those section, nevertheless the same ideas and lines of action need to be impressed upon cultivators of land wherever there Is likely to be a deficiency In. the rainfall at any time of the year, and this means practically ands, considering the cost of water, did not return a fair interest on the capital invested, and they turned their thoughts to the scientific farming of the dry land, and in time dry-farming became a fixed principle and a.prae.- United States that wheat production on irrigated profit and loss., eliminate causes of loss and piofitable depart- ments and crop Some complaints''have been made that dry-fanmijrj methods do not sue cecd in very dry years and that hence these .methods ..re wroaC, Plants will not grow without and is better it is Control Congress oi Farm Women ere in its heat and drought because it followed two other similar sea-sons immediately. The preceding seasons were not so bad, but the rain came at such time of th-e year that there was comparatively little moisture 'in the soil during the growing periods. This, should not argue against the dry-farming methods, as they are j simply seed farming methods which ri Government has 2p. experimental sta-jtiie season of 1911 was uniisuallj lions devoting entire'attention to dry-farming experiments, and to the educating or tho farmers in the use of drought-resisting plants and tbe modern tillage methods that are bring- ing success to all who are trying them. JIany states are also doing a. won- derful work along the line of encour- aging the extension of dry-farming methods. At the dry-farming exper- imental stations conducted under the j are applicable in a greater or less de- auspices of, or in conjunction with gree to every section of the world. nrelhcds do produce good results in three seasons out of five, and are more likely to produce results every year than any other method which has been devised. What the farmer wants is results. If by tillage or dry-farming he can ir.ore.Tse the service of his vr.iter, it should be ci business proposition for him to study. History of farming- shows thai unit water is not EO- to tbe crop a-j that which Local Board of Control Dry Farming Congress W. Downer, Chairman; A. Cun nlngham Chairman; T. Burns, Secretary; R. Tinning, Worship, George Hatch, Mayor; J. Goods; W McNicol V Gibbons 9- C. G. K. J. H. Fleetwood; Hayr; J. H. Skeith; W. H. Falrflcld; J. D, Hlglnbothsm; Adams; E. Galvln; E. Mc- Arthur; H. Stacey; B. Bowman; L; Nalimlth; slorm; J. Shepherd; A. McKillop; Dowiiey; E..H. WIlHnr f advancing a'gTiculture to the high lane it worthily deserves, elevating rop yield through systematic, scieu- ific tillage and conservation of mciis- for iviJit, valuabkj falls from heaven; but welter is water. no matter Imv obtained, and as irri- gation is the most expensive system of. farming-, thu ij-risation farmer is obliged as a business proposition, to secure the maximum amount of crop tiie development of an idea, that a system of fanning may result for the benefit of future generations. Nearly every other large" organisation that has attempted a-world-wide campaign from every acre. claim that by has attempted a-worW-wWo cainpaiEn j storing MID natural precfultaiion in nt any iaa had an, underlying the earth for of the nlnni-, cunvnt ot The the eartii for use of the plants dur- ing the growing season, we have -tlw most efficient anil economical system of moisture supply, and that these I factors sho'.ild bo considered in tlie 1 additional KIMISC of irrigation water. Tho department, of -Agriculture, through its cxiUM-inu-MHs with and suppltmcnuMy irrigation, has ab- solutely proved the theories of the Dry -Fanning and ex- perts say tho phrase ".Dry-Fann- ing" covers tho most practical sys- tem of agriculture ever conceived, in that tho methods are as ncces.sary to the farmer iu tim .snb-hnniid district where no irnlgaeion is possible and where crop production is not possible umler Mie old-mphioned ming Congress has always stood fast which the session is being held. porlant than the first at Denver; This year tin: Congress has been of- T. a "newspaper man oE licered "as follows International prc-' Denver, was ma.de secretary at sidciit, Dr. -John A. Widtsot, ,presi- second'Congress and lie has continued' dent of Utah AgrienHufal College, since as tlie executive secretary. the small beginning of a mere 'hand- ful of HIGH in Denver, Colo., in 1905, it has broadened out and grown to up- wards of members, with work- arcour, monton, era, an- c aes eparmen o agrcuure.) ada, chairman F. H, Linlield, Boze- Mere the name changed to tho' man, Mont.; Daniel Morgan, Dry-Farming Washinglon C.R. Root, Denver; Col- Eight months 'later at Billings, railo nl in City, Clicycivne, Spokane and Dry-farmed wheat shows a higher ins branches in Ifi countries of tbe orailo A. H. Mantle, Hcgina, Sag-, Mont., came the great gathering-Jhat world, and with individual members kalchcwan Dr. John A. Witllsoe, fixed scattered throughout 50 nations. Its membership stretches from the far north to the far south, and from east to west on both hemispheres, and it is daily increasing. Six annual sessions have been held, respectively in Denver, Salt Lake the standing of the Congress as' tlie largest convention held in thp1 West each year. At Spokane, Wash., in 1910, tins and cent, mom milling Cermany, Italy, Krur, IVn gluten in drv-farmed than irrigated Moyico, and otner.couiit.ires, whin? Th.. wheats. Tho itveriifro protein content jcfiiH-iiturs of nn.ir'y every slate in tho of United Slates wnosts is III per cent, gruwn umier all conditions, while in Utah in iflio winter wbcai-j grow.) under dry methods tested per cent, in protein as againbt 11.114 per cent, for the from I the hupii'J district sof the country. Interns Monal Dry-Farming Con- gress is an altruistic organization, and has been one of the wonders of mod- ern organizations. If. is devoid of pol- itics or religion; but -U caters to all, for the good of all, ami its mission has been carried out in a wide open policy i.nitod States and every province Jn hr.vv> fr ijmted in tho Jelib- era t ions of Congress, Its former presidents have been tho late Fisher harris of Salt Lake City; Ex-Gov. B- U. oi Wyoming; Gov. Eclvviu L. j D.cnk .Mondell of Wyoming, and I.T. John H. Worst, president of North IJ-ikoia l College. The members of the. Congress arc those who and (iolcKa heads oi (k'pattmeiHs paid the annual foe who arc appointed 1-y katchewan Dr. John A. Wiillsoe, Logan, Tho pioneer dry-fanning' tinn a scientific association. With m tms headquarters in Denver, of which .I.'standing was emphasized by the at- IJonaliui! and C. C. Williams, the I tendance of more .than tlele- lattcr a former Denver a vast exposition of and tlipn editor of Uie Scientific products and a program of scicn- mcr, the moving spirits. This'tific agricultural discussions that association gained several hundred .caught the attention of the thinking i im-inhers in Colorado, Kansas, New; world. arol Wyoming in 1005 vrar the Congress was held at I and considcratlo good. Its Colorado Springs, Colo., upwards of .insllioil and ila work- 3 500 visitors fhroniug the city, and Ulan w.rc not popular, it was 01IC Ulc mosl I urn! its workers realized that a educational gatlicrinps ever held. The i-liiingn was needed. exhibition tents were two Mocks In the summer of IftOli a committee" long, 'and tlie exhibits of dry-tanned consisting of .lesso F. McDonald, then products were both interesting and j governor oi Colorado, Williams, Don- instructive. At Uiis Congress tho i aliue, Charles E. Wantland and W. E. farm women organized, and that aux- I It. Mills, met and formulated plans Iliary is proving one of the best fea- for a working body to he known as lures oi tho work, in. that it is edii- Ibe Trans-Missouri Dry-Farming Cqu-, eating the housewife to conserve Ik-1 sist of the various dry-farming stales !work while obtaining better, results, west of the Missouri river. Gov. Me-j improving the, conditions ofJtho.homc, Donald shortly issued a call tor atand tlie education: ot the [convention to he held at Denver in fact, carrying out in detail that work, j Inli! February, 1907. The active work} which conduces to make farm iife jOf preparation was placed in the pleasantcr and tbe farm home most' bauds of C, C. Williams and Arthi'rjchecrful, bringing health and 1 Williams, llio latter tlien secretary of ness to all iu rural coinmimitiw. agriculture, agricultural schools, ag- tbe Denver Chamber of Commerce. ..........j ----------c. ricultural Tfid bodies The attendance, was .unexpectedly ho farm home and increasing the The organization is made up 6! a prc-; large, ami the convention was length- (.xccutivc Sccrctary-trea5urcr'; cned from three to four davf by pop- honorary vice-presidents, who are ular vote of the delegate. The late, t former presidents three American Fisher-' Harris, then secretary of the. Men and women pay its nominal vice-presidents; international cbrrcs- Salt Lake City Commercial dues of SI a year, 'leave their business Ponding sccrelaris i boaid of was made, president of the new or-, and travel long distances, merely for crnors an executne committee and ganization. For sonta reason it Ian-1 tho development of an idea, that a a hoard of control selected by vtlie guished, and the second session at system of funning may result for the stiltc or province of the countrj m Salt, Lake was smaller and, less .unit, Logan, Ulah chairman foun'dation Then came the Cheyenne meeting in to an ideal, and it has never wavered fund. Dr. -I. II. Worst, Farg.o, North the winter of held in a blU- erefrom. Dakota; executive secretary-treasuryzanl, bill attended by representatives The growth the Congress has er, John T. Hums, Lelhbridge, Alhcr- of foreign governments and recognizes' almc-jL marvelous. Starting from 'a' Canada board of governors, by agricultural'colleges and the tin-- llarcourt, Edmonton, Alberta, Can- ited States department of agriculture.) ;