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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 19, 1972, Lethbridge, Alberta -Hiimdoy, Otlober 1972 THE LETHBRIDGE HERAID _ J9 Official opening of AMA Friday Official opening ceremonies [or the new Alberta Motor As- sociation building have been Echcdulcd [or the weekend. Clarence Copilhomc, provin- cial minister of highways and Bob Dowling, minister respon- sible for tourism, will join Mayor Andy Anderson and local police and HCMP representa- tives Friday tit p.m. for the ribbon cutting. Local AMA chairman Fred King ajid president B. A. J. Smith, from Edmonton, will officiate. Friday evening, films and live Hawaiian entertainment will lie held at 8 o'clock' in Svcn Erlck' sen's Family Restaurant. AMA manager John Rhodes said 350 tickets have been given out lor the entertainment night and only a few are available at the AMA building, G08 5th Ave. S. An open house at the AMA has been scheduled for Satur- day. College to extend courses to Peigan Indian Reserve The Lclhbridgc Community' College is proceeding with plans to establish confinuinf! education courses on the Peigan Indian Reserve. Associate director of con- tinuing education, Dale Hey- land, met Friday with Peigan Chief Maurice MacDougall and his 10-mcmber education com- mittee to discuss types of INSURANCE LIABILITY BONDS AUTO FIRE ROSS1TER AGENCIES LTD. ESTABLISHED 1911 Lower Fbor 517 4lh Ava. S. Phone 327-1541 course and Cacililies availahl at Brocket. Mr. Hey land said (he com mitlec was extremely respon live aJid presented many grxx course suggestions reflectin Ihe needs of the reserve re: idimls. Generally, he said, womc wanted courses in home eo nomics like sewing, quiltir and cooking while the me wanl carpentry, welding ar electrical skills. Mr. Hey land will prepai the curriculum and invcsliga equipment requirements befo reporting to the committee with recommendations. Earlier this week the school of continuing educatii registered about 100 residen of the Blood Indian Reserve in basic skills and technical courses at SI. Paul's learning centre near Cardfilon. Socreds would eliminate income taxes Money system root of most problems KEITH HANCOCK Socrcd candidate The money system Is at the root ol most problems in Can- ada, says Kcilh Hancock, 39, the Social Credit candidate in the Lclhbridge riding in the Oct. 30 election. Within three years ol taking office in Ottawa a Social Credit government would eliminate in- come taxes, he said in an in- terview. "I'm no expert and this would have to be worked out scientifi- he said, but basically the idea would be to print enough money each year to cover the federal government's annual budget. BACKGROUND Mr. Hancock was brought up on a dairy farm at Raymond, attended Raymond high school and spent three years in Ar- gentina as a Mormon mission- ary. In 1956 he met Connie King, then a secretary with Imperial Oil in Calgary, and they mar- ried at the Mormon Temple in Cardston. In 1958 the couple moved to Raymond from Calgary and Mr. Hancock went into part- nership with his father in the insurance and real estate busi- ness. His father bowed.out of the business last and Mr. Hancock disposed of the insur- ance end and nms the real c.statc business himself. About a week before the So- cred nomination convention last month, Mr. Hancock said he was approached by Ted llin- man, the MLA for Cardston, Fort Chipewyaii is subject of historical society meet Fort Chipewyan: Emporium of the North will be the topic of discussion at -a meeting of the Historical Society ok Alber- ta, Whoop-Up Country Chapter, at 8 p.m. Oct. 24 at Sir Alex- ander Gall Museum. J.imcs Parker, president of the Historical Society of Alberta anri archivist at the Rutherford Library and Archives, Univcr- Unemployment Canada's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 7.1 per termed "the blackest mark tliis government's sorry record in office." A local labor offi- cial predicted the rale would climb to (he 8 per cent figure by February. to attend conference CITY OF LETHBRIDGE COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT CIVIC GRANTS 1973 Applicalion forms are available for communily groupi and agencies wishing lo apply for city grants for Ihe year 1973. Applicalion forms are available at the Community Service! Deparlrhent and are to be returned by Nov- ember 15th, 1972. Any group or agency requiring assistance with their application may contact the office of Ihe Com- munity Services DeparlmGnl 328-2341, exl. 203. A Mormon conference in talhbridge Friday, to Sunday mil choose a successor to Elmo Fletcher, president ol the Lethbridge stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mr. Fletcher, a dentist, was appointed president of the Al- borta temple ol the church and is currently moving lo Card- ston from where tie has lived since 1938. keynote address at the three-day gathering this week- end will be at 10 a.m. Sunday at the Lethbridge Stake Centre, 28th St. and Scenic Drive, by Eldon Tanner of Salt Lake City, Utah. Mr. Tanner is first counsellor to president Harold B. Lee. The conference is expected to draw Mormons. During his stay in Lelhbrldge, Mr. Fletcher has been a direc- tor of Ihe Lethbridge Chamber oi Commerce and a member of the Lions Club. He has been stake president of the church for 12 years. During that lime the stake, which includes all of AJ berta south of Claresholm, ha grown from to mem hers. Mr. Flelcher, 53, was born at Mogroth and has five sons who all went Into church mis onary work. Mrs. Fletcher