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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - November 10, 1973, Lethbridge, Alberta LETHIRIDQE November Knows facts about agriculture 'Hat MP recalls Depression years Smooth sailing For adult boaters it looks like the tide is but for Trevor Petrow and John Foster of the winter brings a place to slide. With more snow forecast smooth sailing is assured for the youngsters. U.S. actions key to outcome of Mid-East war By PAUL JACKSON Herald OtUwa BweM OTTAWA Western Cana- dian cattleman Bert Hargrave can remember the time dur- ing the Depression when his father couldn't get one cent a pound for his beef and when a neighbor sent a carload of cat- tle to Winnipeg and couldn't even get enough to pay the freight bill. Mr. now MP for Medicine still knows what the rigors of ranching are all about. The southern Alberta land where his family has and ranched since 1896 is so dry it takes 50 acres to pasture one cow compared to regions in central Canada where you can pasture a cow on a single acre of land. indeed. Mr. Hargrave knows the facts about agriculture and he's hoping he can impress some of those facts on the federal government. His qualifi-. cations are impressive. He's a former president of both the Canadian Cattlemen's Association and the Western Stock Grower's Association. In a week or so ago he was the only Canadian to be elevated to the International Livestock Ex- position's Hall of Fame. In the 56-year-old cattleman is hotly tipped as being a future agriculture minister should the federal Progressive Conservatives ever form a government. One fellow MP says he probably knows more about agriculture in any region of Canada than any other member of the House of Commons. A longtime Parliament Hill noting the Alberta MP's reticence to make full blooded speeches or go tear- ing away at the Liberal ad- figures he must be Any man who's smart enough to keep his mouth shut at the right time has a lot going for The current.MP for Medicine caused something of a stfr--a little over a year ago when he won the PC nomination in his riding. For years he'd been a close friend of former Liberal agriculture minister Bud the man he turfed out of office just a year but Mr. Hargrave says it's a myth that he himself was ever a Liberal party cardcarrier or at Mr. Olson's 1968 nomina- tion meeting. first political nominating conven- tion I ever attended in my life was my Mr. Hargrave backed Mr. Olson solidly at predicting that if Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau was returned to power in 1968 an Albertan would be agriculture minister and promote the rigtot policies for the industry. He was right in the first wrong in the second. As Mr. Olson began promoting Mr. Trudeau's own philosophies and as the term 'supply was heard more and Mr. Hargrave became disillusion- ed during a spell he spent in a hospital decided be himself should seek election to Ottawa. He went straight ahead and did it. Mr a rugged out- doors type of man despite his long list of achievements and awards of found the first three months in Ot- tawa hard going. It was'like going back to school after an absence of 25 he says Soon he had read- justed to deskwork as well as constituency ploughed enthusiastically into work on the special trends in food costs and the standing Parliamentary com- mittees on both agriculture and regional economic expan- sion. As a Mr. Hargrave has a strong liking for Mr. Whelan. He's found him to be straight blunt speak- ing and with many characteristics farmers traditionally like. But he's concerned that even under Mr. Whelan the federal government still believes in a hit and miss policy for far- ming. Tariffs on one off the next. Embargoes on one removed another. And the supply-management philosophy is still championed on Parliament Hill. Try Before You Buy UP TO 30-DAY TRIAL ON YOUR DOCTOR'S RECOMMENDATION MAI CO SMITH-JONES HEARING AID SERVICE RIPLEY OPTICAL 618 3rd S. 328-5447___ In Honor of. REMEMBRANCE DAY We Will be CLOSED NOV. 12th R N 4 7 STORES TO SMVE TOU mT 2nd AVE. IARONS IOW ISLAND C COALDALE PltTUM iUTTI TABEIt By ROBERT R. BOWIE Christian Science Monitor In the Middle East the spotlight has been on the Arabs and the United and the U S S R They of the main protagonists. Their actions and interactions will largely determine whether the region achieves a stable peace or suf- fers continuing hostility and warfare. Yet the vital interests of especially those of Western Europe and are also deeply involved And the handling of the crisis is bound to affect U.S. relations with them Japan and Western Europe are far more dependent than the U.S on Middle East oil U.S. imports of crude from the area are now only about 7 per cent of its total though rising rapidly which lacks domestic ob- tains over 90 per cent of its supply from Middle East sources. Western Europe is 9nly a little better off and also depends heavily on Middle East oil. For continuing access to such oil is a matter of life and death for their economies QUALITY DRY CLEANING BY THE LOAD ft-lbe. PRE-SPOTTED AFTER-SPOTTED By Our Attendant PARKSkOE COIN-OP DRY CLEAN MM South FiffceMe Dr. Phone Yet the U S policy in the Middle East has virtually ignored Japanese or European views. Its one-sided support for which has antagonized the Arabs and prompted recent oil is strictly unilateral. While Japan and Western Europe would back Israel's right -to secure both favor a more even-handed policy which also recognizes Arab interests. The allies have appar- ently not even been con- sulted in the current crisis The U.S. did not discuss with them its decision for heavy resupply of arms to some from Western Europe It has not kept them abreast of its dealings with the U S.S R Nor did it even notify them in advance of the sudden worldwide alert of U.S forces a week ago Inevitably such con- duct severely strains the relationship America's allies have naturally sought to avoid being identified with un- ilateral U S actions which they feel disregard their interests. And the U.S. has added insult to injury by denouncing them for themselves from U.S. policies and actions during the crisis. This breakdown in relations is bad in its own right But the im- plications are more serious and far-reaching. Oil and the Middle East are only one example of a per- vasive reality. Interde- pendence among West- ern and the U.S. is a fact of life in monetary and relations with the developing nations and the Communist states. They ean assure their well-being and security only if they work together to cope with these massive problems. co-operation is a necessary precondition for moving toward any solid structure of global order and peace But achieving such collaboration will require overcoming serious dif- ficulties. A major one is the U S. trend toward un- displayed m the Middle East crisis. This breakdown in relations is bad in its own right. But the implications are more serious and far-reaching. Oil and the Middle East are only one example of a private reality. Interdependence among Western Ja- and the U.S. is a fact of life in monetary en- and relations with the developing nations and the Communist states. They can assure their well-being and security only if they work together to cope with these massive problems. Trilateral co-operation is a necessary precondition for moving toward any solid structure of global order and peace. But achieving such collaboration will require overcoming serious dif- ficulties. A major one is the U.S. trend toward un- displayed in the Japan nor Western Europe is content with U S hegemony or unilateral action They will expect to be treated more like partners in the future. Yet at present neither is ready to fulfill the role Western Europe is not yet un- ified or able to act as an entity in many fields. And Japan is still seeking to clarify its role in the world both are uncertain about the United States and its priorities. They are concerned by Nixon's stress on super- power relations and by the tendency toward un- ilateralism Together these factors create distrust and tensions which severely impede co- operation Overcoming these obstacles is the prerequisite for the joint action essential for coping with the many com- mon problems Obviously only governments can ultimately initiate and carry on the necessary con- sultation and co-ordination of policy But there is also a role for private efforts to generate a wider awareness of common needs and to propose common approaches and solutions for specific issues. That is the premise of the Trilateral which has just been formed by groups of leading private citizens from Western and North and which held its first meeting In Tokyo last week. The commission will seek to promote habit of working together on problems of mutual to seek to ob- tain a shared understanding of these complex and to devise and disseminate proposals of general While the aim is to foster co-operation among the three advanced it is recognized that they cannot cope with many of the problems alone. They will have to take account of the interests of other nations and regions and often will have to work within wider inter- national such as the International Monetary the World Bank and its etc Poet asks friends to burn letters LONDON Poet W H. who died Sept 29 in left a will asking his friends to burn all letters he wrote to his executors announced today in a notice in The Times Literary Supplement. of the reason for this is that he did not want his biography to be said poet Stephen one of Auden's otesl friends. request is part of the opera- tion to make it extremely dif- ficult to write his Spender explained that Auden felt a writer should be known only by his writing and that his private life was of no we forget Remembrance Day November llth 1973 In Remembrance Sears will be CLOSED November Sears ;