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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald (Newspaper) - March 24, 1971, Lethbridge, Alberta STIll GOING STRONG - George Gibbs admits his "bones are aching some now," but the no-year-old former bronco buster still saws his own wood and keeps up with other chores at his house in Walla Walla, Washington. He still says, however, that he's a young man and attributes his longevity to daily doses of cayenne pepper. Real princess wants to play peasant role ROME (AP) - A real - life princess says her ambition is to play a peasant woman in the movifis. She is Ira von Furstenberg, bora to the title of princess and an automobile fortune. Her latest role is that of a Super railway system starts WASHINGTON (Beoiter) - A government - created railway passenger system, unifying all present services imder one management, will begin operating to 114 cities in the United States May 1, it was announced here. David Kendall, chairman of the National Railroad Passenger Corp. known as Railpax, said tihe new system would rfiach 85 per cent of the urban population in the U.S. prostitute in Brother Sun, Sister Moon, the film Franco Zeffirelli is making about the life of St. Francis of Assisi. "These roles are a real challenge," she said in an interview, but her ultimate cinematic ambition is to portray a Scili-an peastant woman - how she lives, loves and dies. Now 30, Ira is a tall and dark-haired beauty. A daughter of German Prince Tassilo von Furstenberg and Clara Agnelli, the sister of Fiat President Gianni Agnelli, she chose the cinema despite her father's title and her mother's money. DOESN'T MIND ROLES Lowly and minor roles cause no conflict to the woman Europeans still call princess. Nor does she mind exhibiting her body for magazines. "I am still scared of a lead," she says after 15 supporting credits. "Remember, I am still learning." As a girl, Ira led a jet-set life capturing headlines as a young swinger. She became a bride at 15, a mother at 16 and was a two-time divorcee at 24. Now she seems married for good - to actmg. Monitor pollution MONTREAL (CP)-The Ak Purification Foundation of Greater Montreal Inc., a privately subsidized pollution survey organization, has set up a mobile air testing laboratory in a downtown parking lot. The mobile lab, equipped with $23,000 worth of technical instruments, can monitor the sulpha-tion rate of the atmosphere, the soiling mdex, the dust fall, suspended particulate matter, sulphuric acid, sulphur dioxide and carbon monoxide, on a 24-hour basis. The LetHbtidge Herald Fourth Section Lethbridge, Albprta, Wednesday, March 24, 1971 Pages 39-46 Japanese market for Canadian coal could stop very suddenly Pant Suits-Pant Sets- FOR NEW INTO SPRING Regular 29.98 to 69.98 19 ^5 A forecast of the season ahead, yours to wear right now at big savings! Choose from tunics with pants, pants with long coats, and oi'her pant looks. CREDIT IS YOURS AT ALL BETTY SHOPS ON ONE CARD betty shop CENTRE VILLAGE MALL Phone 3:;8-5025 By JOHN MIKA Herald Ottawa Bureau OTTAWA - The Japanese market for Canadiian coal is extremely volatile as two recent bits of intelligence illistrate. They suggest that while demand is rising with the exhilarating speed of an express-elevator just now it could stop with dizzying suddenness. A good measure of the speed came in the February issue of the Canadian Mining Journal in which a federal mineral resources specialist surveyed the Japanese situation. As' of Jan. 1 sfac Canadian companies had signed contracts for 9.7 million short tons of coke exports this year, the article showed. > But even before it was off the presses, it was considerably out of dMe as contracted tonnage by the same companies had risen to 12.9 million tons. And even this figure may be out of date by now as six other companies in the process of provmg up exploration finds in various parts  of Alberta and B.C. have begun negotiations in Tokyo, Mean\^e, an expert warned that the joy ride may end m a jolt unless the Canadian government and business community get together for a rational development of future trade with Japan. "The day of expandmg Japanese demand for Cana d i a n raw materials may drastically decluie with the end of the present decade bringing instead increased Japanese demand for the, widest range of Canadian services and finished goods," Canada - Japan Trade Council President Robert Houston told a hearing this month. "While it is' my view that her demand for resource materials will grow tremendously to the end of this decade, I believe it could then level off and, shortly after, even begin a moderate decline " But he doesn't think the Rising Sun is going to set - just move to a different economic quarter of the post - industrial stage. "I beEeve Japan can and will mamtain her rate of national economic growth - but in a different form and upon a different base. . "I see Japan's whole econ. omy chang&ig to the point where the Japanese economy of 1985 will bear little resem^ blance to the Japanese economy we know today." Houston said Japan's economy has expanded so far by building a "giant production machine turning out ever - increasing quantities of a vast array of items from ships to shoes, tape recorders to bulldozers. "But will Japan continue simply to turn out an ever - swelling flood of steel, ships, motor cars, TV sets, radios and such? I doubt it." The reason is simple: Japan's spectaculai- industrial growth has spawned spectacular problems that threaten to engulf it. To begm with, 90 per cent of production is consumed in her domestic market and it soon will be drownmg in its own flood of material goods at a time when its citizens demand more social and recreational amenities', Houston says Japan already has begun towards the solution, trMisformation of the industrial impetus to research and scientific expertise which can be sold abroad as knowledge, patented technolo g i c a 1 processes and super - sophisticated products. "It would not surprifB me to see Japan completely out of production of many items for which today she is world famous," said Houston. "To my mind this dramatic change will have great and beneficial repercussions through the whole Pacific Rim region." But Canadians will have to start transforming theu: trad- ing stance to benefit by these changes, beginning with more systematic government and busmess contacts to learn not only Japan's needs but also learn some of her superior methods, he said. "It might he a very mterest-ing exercise wei-e Canadian suppliers of basic raw mater- ials to suggest to tlieir Japanese counterparts, during contract negotiations, that more Canadian content in shipments was desu-able," said Houston. "There is nothing that I know of to indicate Japanese businessmen would be averse to a proposal that a greater degree of processing or even manufac- ture be undertaken in Canada before shipment." Houston's message was plain: the day of easy sales simply of materials to Japan is here for a while but it simply won't last. The fast elevator ride could brmg an equally fast plunge unless Canadians gradually prepare to operate at the higher industrial levels. On verge of serious level Noise pollution grows and grows By BILL NEIKHIK WASHINGTON (AP) - A government-sponsored panel said here that noise pollution m the .United States is "on the verge of reaching a serious level." It called for new federal and state standards to protect Americans against hearing damage and annoyance The panel reconunended steps to help take away some of the din of modern living and said the U.S. should establish a national goal to "work toward an environment for all Americans free of noise that jeopardizes their health and welfare or unnecessarily detracts from the quality of life." "Millions of workers are now exposed to noise levels that have been shown conclusively to produce hearing damage," the panel named by the commerce department said. "Most of these workers are unaware of the hazard and do not act to protect themselves." The panel, said the federal government should expand its role in developing standards foi Being phased out is tlie single - mlndedness of assembly line production which, like a hormonal herbicide, threatens to kill Japanese society through ^heer growth of its crowded plant to unnatural proportions, breaking imder the strains of staggering logistical, pollution, labom- and social problems A five - year plan adopted last June deliberately seeks to moderate and shift direction of economic growth. Whole industries are being exported to Pacific Rim countries where labour and materials abound but capital and expertise are short. As Japan shifts, she will become an importer of semi and finished goods instead of raw materials - beginning with "blister" copper and pelletized iron instead of raw ore, lumber and paper instead of logs and pulp then ascendmg to consumer products and specialized macfajneiy. allowable exposure to industrial noise. It said states and local governments should adopt standards at least as stringent as federal standards. STANDARDS NEEDED The department of health, education and welfare should establish "interim criteria and guidelines for use in setting standards to human exposure to noise." The panel also said the commerce department should de- Gorton-Vietnamese program succeeding CANBERRA (AP) - Defence Minister John Gorton, returned from a visit to Vietnam, said here the South Vietnamese objectives m Laos have been achieved and their withdrawal should not be interpreted as defeat. There had been "extremely bloody battles," between the South and North Vietnamese m Laos, he said. Gorton said in his assessment the Viet-namization program is succeeding. velop voluntary standards for placing noise ratings on consumer products "that are a significant source of noise" In cases where the noise could produce hearing damage, the labelling standards should be mandatory, said the report. Other recommendations called for expanded research into noise pollution, action by all governments to consider the concept of "noise zoning" in planning, better traimng of workers in noise abatement and better methods of measuring noise pollution. One of the recommendations, establishing an office of noise abatement in the Environmental Protection Agency, has been proposed by President Nbcon in a bUl now before the Senate. The panel concluded that most Americans are responsible for what it called a "widespread pollutant which can have many adverse effects on man." It said 150 million Americans livmg in cities and suburbia are exposed to annoying noise which "constitutes a degradation of health____" Firearms and rock-'n'-roll music pose a potential threat to hearing, the report said, and transportation is a major source of America's noise. "The current trend toward producing larger and more powerful trucks, raising speed limits on our expressways, and expanding the volume of truck traffic will greatly increase traffic noise unless effectiv9 countermeasures are taken." Urban noise levels are rismg, exposing city-dwellers to the din of traffic, pneumatic drills, machinery, construction, and demolition, yet, anti-noise ordinances "contain no provision for quantitative measurement of noise levels and, hence, are difficult to enforce." MAY TRAVEL WASHINGTON (Reuter) -The state department has declined to rule out the p<)ssibaity that State Secretary William P. Rogers might visit Israel and Arab capitals next month. An Israeli spokesman in Jerusalem said Rogers might go there in April. FINAL 3 DAYS-CAPITOL'S CONTINUES... tn SATURDAY! ... A manufacturer's special showing of all new 1971 Furniture Styles styled by one of Western Canada's leading manufacturers! Come in this week . . . select your fabric . . . select your style or choose as shown - and get custom built furniture for your home. By making your selection during the show and sale we are able to offer this custom service at no additional cost! OVER 100 PIECES TO CHOOSE FROM NOW ON DISPLAY!  CHESTERFIEID SUITE Modern 4 Piece Group includes sofa, Mr. and Mrs. Chair ^dOA and Footstool ...............^�*tTO LOVE SEATS $159 $199 SECTIONALS $299 ,o $519 CHESTERFIELD SUITES $189 $229 $249 $299 $319 $339 $419 STUDIO LOUNGES FROM $89 OCCASIONAL CHAIRS and ROCKERS $16.95 $55 $119 $159 $199 RECLINERS FROM CONVENIENT BUDGET TERMS AVAILABLE! OPEN TILL 9PM THURSDAY* and FRIDAY NIGHTS! ;