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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald (Newspaper) - March 23, 1971, Lethbridge, Alberta 14 - THI LETHBRIDGE HERALD - Tuesday, March 23, 1971 Your horoscope By Jean* Dixon WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24 YOUR BIRTHDAY TODAY: Finding a balance between spiritual development and material self-interest is one of the subtle issues of this coming year. Overdoing in any direction flips quickly, requiring frequent picking up the pieces and starting over again. Keep financial resources settled securely, as you've had them; realize quite plausible schemes turn out to be just that, to your loss. Today's natives are often rash, impulsive, passionate, fearless. ARIES (March 21 - April 19): Come up with a different LAWRENCEE. LAMB. M. D. Cigar-smoking data not all in Dear Dr. Lamb - Please make this clear for a lot of people. Are cigars as bad as cigarettes for your lungs? I think they smell worse and pollute the air in homes and business places. Dear Reader - I don't like them either. Some cigars do have a pleasing aroma to some people. Others prefer the smell at a distance,, the more distance the better. They certainly do pollute the air for the non-smoker. Cigars are not as frequently associated with heart and vascular disease or lung disease as cigarettes because cigars smokers do not usually inhale. Some cigar smokers do more chewing than inhaling. The same applies to a pipe. The statistics on cigar smoking end pipe smoking really are not as valid since it is difficult to collect as many people with this habit than it is cigarette smokers. I do advise the cigarette smoker who is hooked and can't quit to switch to cigars or a pipe. If the person inhales smoke from these, the switch 28 overbooked oh flight TORONTO (CP) - Twenty-eight overbooked Air Canada passengers left for Bermuda one day late. The passengers watched their intended flight' take off without them after 182 seats on a DC-8 stretch jet were filled. Richard Roberts, 52, of Peterborough, Ont., one of the passengers who did not make the Saturday trip, said: "I can see being overbooked by three or four people, but 28 is utterly ridiculous." An Air Canada spokesman said all airlines book beyond capacity because a sizeable percentage of passengers book seats but never show up for the flight and fail to call in a cancellation. Air Canada pays the hotel and meal bills for out-of-town passengers squeezed off a flight and assures them of seats on the next flight' at half price, said the Air Canada spokesman. probably won't help. Some people get cancer of the lip from a pipe.    Dear Dr. Lamb - I was upset concerning your statement about truck drivers being "a good example of mobile transmitters of the disease." If you are so aware of the rising tide of venereal disease in this country, then you should be equally aware of the mode of spreading this and other diseases. It is not through truck drivers! It is through those metal machines that carry man from New York City to San Francisco in a little more than four hours - jet aircraft! Dear Reader - I am sure you are right. Jet travel as another example of our mobile society does have its influence. I have always thought that New York had everything. I am surprised that New Yorkers have to go all the way to San Francisco to get anything. Very interesting. *   Dear Dr. Lamb - I have a nephew who has trouble having a bowel movement. My niece had him checked but they said there isn't anything wrong. I don't think they checked his upper bowels. Could there be something wrong with them? Even when he is given a laxative he strains so hard his face turns red and he seems to be in pain. He is about two years old. Could you please tell us what to do? Dear Reader - Bowel problems, like feeding problems, can begin at a very early age, If the child has had a checkup and nothing is wrong his problem must be related to his diet and the amount of emphasis placed on bowel movements. The upper bowel (small bowel) in this case would really have no bearing on the problem. If the stools are hard and dry, then perhaps it would be well to increase the bulk in the diet. Not all babies, nor adults for that matter, require frequent bowel movements. He should be left alone and not urged to have a movement until he feels the need. A proper diet and a less-concerned attitude should solve the problem, chemical laxatives will not. The bowel can sometimes be made a bit more active by increasing the amount of fruit and fruit juice in the diet. scheme, preferably with aa alternative as well. See the day as a testing course, check how your methods work and Can be bettered in the future. TAURUS (April 20  May 20): Likely more than one string is attached to any offer received now (and perhaps an;unconscious one on yours in return). Decision time shouldn't be shortened, despite clamor from those waiting. GEMINI (May 21  June 20): It is about time you got a complete look at yourself and your needs. Medical checkups by competent, licensed practitioners avert much trouble. CANCER (June 21. July 22): Younger people create considerable confusion with an experiment today. Do your share to restore normal conditions so you can go on with imprtant activity. LEO (July 23  Aug. 22): The first order of business is to assign priorities, with everybody concerned in on the discussion to avert later confusion. VIRGO (Aug. 23  Sept. 22>: Information must be passed promptly among those working with you, and it should work both ways if you are to sue- LIBRA (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22): The day clears up following a passing moment of emotional stress, perhaps surprise. Put in a full quota of intended work. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 .Nov. 21): Qualify has to be taken into account in all purchases, however routine. Aside from material considerations, higher levels of thinking are attainable as well. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Get your work done despite temptations to take off and just have fun. You have a compliment to contemplate. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19): It is quite all right to know what you want and push bard to get it now. Put in your bid for attention. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 � Feb. 18): Sort out which activities are really practicable under present conditions; shelve the rest for reconsideration or some other season. PISCES (Feb. 19 - March 20?: Now you can put together more energy and better direction, get a firm grasp on things that have been uncertain or elusive. GOREN ON BRIDGE BY CHARLES H. GOREN a iwji >r tm cmcm* Trimm East-West vulnerable. East deals. NORTH A J843 S> J9S O QJ3 + A42 WEST EAST *A 6KQ1097652 C75 08842 *QJf7�53+Void SOUTH  Void Pan 5 A Pass 5 Pass 8 partnership, had ideas of his own. With the rather naive expectation of scoring a killing, he opened fire with his singleton ace of spades. Declarer ruffed with the deuce of hearts in his hand and saw that if the trump were evenly divided, he could discard a club from dummy on his fourth diamond and then ruff out his club loser. II hearts did not divide favor* ably however, it would bl necessary to establish the dummy by ruffing out all the spades. The seven of hearts was led over to the jack, and East's ten very fortunately dropped to establish dummy's nine as a master card in the suit. A spade was trumped with the queen of hearts on which West threw a diamond. South reentered dummy with the jack of diamonds and trumped a third spade with the king of hearts. He next led the three of trumps and successfully finessed North's six after West followed suit with the five. The ace of hearts was now used to trump out dummy's last spade. The North hand was reentered with the ace of clubs and the nine of hearts drew West's remaining trump as declarer got rid of the ten of clubs. The queen of diamonds was overtaken b/ the king and declarer took the remaining tricks with good diamonds and the king of clubs. A neat example of dummy reversal. Time zones Andy sends a complete 20-volume set of the World Book Encyclop e d i a to Royd Waters, age 11, of Salt Lake City, Utah, for his question: When were time zones first made? Time marches westward and every day the 24 hours complete a moving circle around the world. In the 1500s, this moving time schedule baffled the globe - circling mariner, Sir Francis Drake. Many later travelers also were confused by the fact that when is related to where. This problem of local and global time was solved in stages, through several centuries. The final answer was neat and simple. It was reached when the time zones were put in place-less than 90 years ago. *   Sir Francis Drake sailed westward around the world and returned to England in the fall of 1580. He was shocked to learn that the calendars at home were a day behind his ship's records. How had he miscounted and which saint's day had he failed to observe? Drake was unaware that because time moves westward, anyone who circles the globe westward skips one day forward. Navigators soon learned how this global time schedule works. Their maps were charted from pole to pole with 360 meridian lines of longitudes. The sun and stars cross 15 degrees of longitude every hour and complete their westward circle every 24 hours. Sailors observed the heavenly parade to chart their courses by dead reckoning. The seafaring British knew that a global system of navigation must be keyed to longitudes and a time-keeping center. In 1675, they established a precise timekeeping center at the Royal Greenwich Observatory, on Longitude 0 degrees - the Prime Meridian. In the 1700s, they offered a big prize for a reliable sea-going clock to keep sailors in accurate touch with Greenwich tir 2. But these steps failed to solve the everyday problems of local and global time. Sailors still were confused by time changes in Europe and America. When railroads spanned the continents, things grew downright chaotic. According to local time, trains from the east arrived early and those from the west were late. Then a solution occurred to Stanford Fleming, who had mastenm i n d e d the wide Canadian Pacific Railroad. During the 1870s, he talked with Charles Dowd of the United States and others about dividing the continent into time zones. The sensible idea took form and the world was ready for it. On October 11, 1883, the railroads of Canada and the United States agreed to divide their wide continent into four time zones. In the same year, an inernational convent i o n in Washington D.C. agreed to section the entire globe into 24 time zones. Each zone included roughly 15 degrees of longitude, the hourly distance of the sun. The neat system was keyed to those reliable Greenwich timekeepers on the Prime Meridian. After centuries of confu-ion, the time zones have been solving the problems of local and global time for the past 88 years. * * � Nowadays, the Greenwich Observatory radios its precise time signals around the world. Each eastward time zone is one hour ahead and each zone westward is one hour behind. The Prime Meridian marks the moment of mid-day and the new day begins along meridian 180, oh the opposite side of the globe. If this Date Line had been invented in 1580, poor Sir Francis Drake would have known how and just where he gained a calendar day. * .  * Andy Sends a World Book Globe to Tom Balch, age 11, of Clinton, New York, for his question: Did turkeys originate in Turkey? The turkey and his wild ancestors originated in the Americas and this New World bird was introduced into the Old World by early Spanish explorers. We are not so certain about the origin of his odd name. Even experts hold different opinions about it. Some claim that, in a way, the turkey chose his own name. As he mutters to himself, he repeats a phrase that sounds like turk-turk-turk. Surely, it would seem logical to call him the turkey. Other experts disagree with this simple deduction and seek to explain his name on the basis of his travels. In the 1500s, the Spanish took him to Africa and Europe. Europeans confused him with the guinea fowls imported from Africa by way of Turkey. Assuming that Turkey was their native home, they called both of them turkey birds. But, of course, all the turkeys now residing in Turkey or any other part of the Old World are descended from ancestors that originated in America, their native home. Questions asked by children of Herald readers should be mailed to Ask Andy, P.O. Box 765, Huntington Beach, California 92648. (Copyright Chronicle Publishing Co. 1971) No bottlenecks in neiv booze service plan EDMONTON (CP) - There were no bottlenecks as the city's first service for home delivery of liquor was established, Walter Yorkowsky said here. Mr. Yorkowsky uses four radio - controlled vehicles to provide his Dial-a-Bottle service, similar,to those operating in several western cities. For a $2 fee, a vehicle picks up a signed order, makes the purchase at a government liquor store and delivers it. ' The service has been ap-prov vu u y the Alberta Control Board as long as the person signing the o r d e r is over 21, money is collected in advance and deliveries are made only during regular liquor store hours. TV centre burns BUSSSUM (Reuter) - Fire stroyed the nerve centre of Dutch television services here Monday. A Dutch television spokesman said the centre was used for all news and news feature program. TUMBIIWIIDS-By TOM K. RYAN OLT/MATOMTOTK.WAN: it is WITH A pkp SENSE of shock ANPDISKLIEFTHAT jJJOTeiDWHftTSO^piP !�PTrlSVDlJW/U.51D0PT0 GET A LAUGH. �, wmm i ms a t\mm PflllfllltYTROPP/MSIrfEWr wcaim come strip. mi\H AN ATOMrTVMILKA f&f m6rBIP CACKLE5 fROM ABORB) 1WB05CU5.TIDPAY |M A NOSHJESS GROT&QUERY AMD Ofittl muvtwrti trim m YOU* CHOICE 15 CLSAttMY N0S6 Oft MY ASSIGNATION! m*lTHEOL!> PICTUREfJl LAUNDRYJ LADYffj ARCHIE-By Bob Montana z MISS N HAG6LY THESE MORNING IS LATE COFFEE BREAKS FOR, HAVE GOT TO J HER ~>9f -fl FIRST CLASS NEXT MORNIN3 MISS HAG SLY, NOW YOU'RE LATE FOR. WELL... SCHOOL/ Jl WALKED! BOTH WAYS HI AND LOIS-By Dik Browne SHORT RIBS-By Frank O'Neal BUGS BUNNY ;