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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 7, 1973, Lethbridge, Alberta 34- IHi LE1HBRIDGE HERAID Wodneidciy, Mcmh 7, T973 MINISTER REMEMBERS OUR LAST HANGINGS TORONTO (CP) Lt.-Col. Cyrfl Eyerilt of the Salvation Army still remembers the room where it happen Ml and tlie hours leading into Dec. the date of the last hanging in Canada. Now 65, he was then chaplain at Toronto's Don jail when they hanged Ron Turpin, 29, and Ar- thur Lucas, 54, both convicted murderers. The prisoners were told they were going to die after the cabi- net declined to commute the sentences. Col. Evcritt and the warden hail lo lull the condemned men. "Turpin said; 'I can lell by the look on your face there is no hope." I said: "I'm sorry to say' that's Col. Everilt recalled. "Turpin had killed a police- man and knew there was no hope. Lucas had hoped. He was convicted of killing two dope peddlers, a man and his girl- friend." Were Turpin and Lucas shocked that death was to come suddenly that night? "No. After all, there wasn't a thing under the sun we hadn't talked sports, re- ligion. They took it like men. Lucas is the bravest man I ever know in my life." For their last meal, the pris- oners were given steak dinners, which had to bo eaten with spoons as no knives or forks were permitted in Ilieir cells Col. Everilt ate with them. MIDNIGHT DEADLINE t "With one hour lo go, r said: We have an hour. What do you want me to do' TJial brought them up will, a start I wished many times after thai I hadn't said Col. Everitt said. "At 32 midnight, we heard them coming up the steps to the second sheriff, the guards, the governor. They were surprised at the prisoners' altitudes. The guards hand- cuffed them. "Lucas was quite calm. He said, 'Can I finish my Because he was handcuffed, he leaned down and took his last puff. "We all went out of the cell down the corridor to the Col. Everitt said. "It's about 40 paces. I had paced it off. "When we got there, I said 'Goodbye Ron. I will see you in heaven.' Maybe that's too tear-jerking but I felt it. When you're a Christian, you have a lot to fall back on. Then they put the hoods over them." At odds Differences over how lo deal a black guerrilla challenge is threatening the unity of three while regimes in Africa, western diplomats say. South African and Rho- desian leaders are reportedly fearful that Portugal may be unablp lo crush guerrilla -forces threatening its ter- ritory in Mozambique. This Portuguese holding on the East African seaboard provides landlocked Rhodesia with its nearest outlet 1o the sea. It also holds the key to the ultimate success of the Cabora Bassa hydroelectric project being developed to provide South Africa with much-need- ed sources of power. The guerrillas posing the challenge are the Front for the Liberation of Mozambique, or Frelimo. They have tied down thousands of Portuguese trcops by staging ambushes and mining roads and rail lines. In recent months has extended Its operations and guerrillas have- clashed with Rhodesians. Others hove in- tercepted supplies bound for the Cabora Basso project in Mozambique. Portugal has charged that Frelimo units are based in Malawi, the only black African state that has friendly links with the South African and Rhodesian gov- ernments. The charge has brought angry denials from Malawi's president, Hastings Bondo. 'Hands off is byword in China By JONATHAN PEKING (Renter) "Hands off" was the peremp- tory sfgn placed next to a magnificent three-tier cake displayed in the restaurant oE the new international club for foreigners which opened in Peking recently. As somebody pointedly re- marked, the same message serves as the e a u t i o n a r y for the foreign community in Peking in its relations with Chinese people. It is often a source of frus- tration for foreigners in China, now numbering over that they lack all but the superficial contact with the millions around them. A smile, a wave and a "ni hao" (how are you) to the Chinese man-ln-the-street will often elicit a similar response. But simple gestures of hospi- tality between foreigners and Chinese such as paying visits to each other's homes are rare. Any form of closer contact, such as a foreigner taking out a Chinese girl is more or less unthinkable. NOT ALWAYS SO Long-term foreign residents recall that this invisible bar- rier was not so apparent be- fore the 1966-69 cultural revo- lution antf it was not unusual then to have close Chinese friends. Although the outbursts of vi- olent anti-foreign feeling which marked the cultural revolution have long since ceased and the foreign com- munity now is frequently re- ferred to in the Chinese press as "foreign the friendship is still at arm's length. It is not that the Chinese are hostile towards foreign- ers. On the contrary they are usually cordial, and often po- lite to the point of embarrass- ment. For example a foreigner in 'o crowded shop will be hastily ushered to the head of the queue. In restaurants, waiters will summarily eject the Chinese occupants of a table, rather than put foreigners to the inconvenience of waiting a few moments until a table is free. It is A myth that Chinese people ore suspicious of for- eigners who speak their lan- guage anrl those who want to learn can easily acquire a teacher. But foreigners who become fluent in Chinese often find that their sole reward in terms of human contact is a few polite compliments on their linguistic ability. Even the handful of foreign- ers in Peking employed by the Chinese government as teach- ers and translators find that time and patience are re- quired to build up friendships with their Chinese colleagues. The social isolation of the foreign community is rein- forced by the fact that the vast majority of foreign resi- dents are obliged lo live and work in Ihe two big com- pounds in Peking built solely for (heir use. Within the "gilt ghettos" as they are sometimes apartment blocks and diplo- matic missions are ringed by a high fence or a wall" and guarded by Chinese soldiers 1A hours a day. While any foreigner can vrander in and out, all Chinese have to show passes, which are issued only to domestic staff, interpreters, drivers and others who have specific business with foreigners: MAY BE RESENTED Some people believe this off-limits rule must rankle the Chinese, particularly those who recall the bad old days when Chinese were denied ac- cess to the foreign-controlled concession areas in their cit- ies by the foreigners them- selves. Chinese people may also privately resent the fact that the accommodation built for foreigners is usually superior in size, comfort and style to their own. But when people are tackled on this, their stock answer is: "We treat all foreigners .as our guests. We are a back- ward country but we try to provide- them with all the fa- cilities they are used to at home." There are a few minor indi- that the isolation is beginning to break down. Restaurants in Peking no longer insist that foreigners eat in private rooms. As a re- sult, dining" out "with the masses" has become popular with foreigners. Another small break- through was achieved late lost year when a number of children of foreign residents were admitted to Chinese nur- series and kindergartens. Today you can install a luxurious shag carpet yourself with professional results and save 3 ways. on three room Reg. Sq. Yd. Sq. Yd. Floor Fashions Save dollars at this low price Save cost of installation Save oh under-cushioning it's attached Luxurious 'Fancy Free' shag is the carpeling you can install yourself with such professional results, no one will believe il! All it takes is a sharp knife and a keen eye. Made of 100% nylon, this beautiful carpet is really strong. Goes on looking great year after year, even in medium to heavy traffic areas. Just rake or vacuum and the pile springs right back. So comfortable underfoot too, because it's backed with its own foam cushioning. Come see it in eleven glowing colours! 12ft widths. With this exceptional 3-way saving, it's one of the best carpet values for your money today! Save on 9' x 12' rug. Reg. 83.88 40 sq. yds, Enough to carpet the average living room, dining room and hall. Shag rakes. To put 'life' taacK into your shag rug. and ea. Call our floor fashion consultant now. At Simpsons-Sears you work with a professional right in your own home. See samples, get advice, free estimate at no obligation. 000-0000 STORE HOURS: Open Daily n.m. lo p.m. Thursday and Friday 9i30 a.rn. to 9 p.m. Centre Village Mall. Telephone 328-9231 ;