Internet Payments

Secure & Reliable

Your data is encrypted and secure with us.
VeraSafe Security Seal

Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

- Page 8

Join us for 7 days to view your results

Enter your details to get started

or Login

What will you discover?

  • 108,666,265 Obituaries
  • 86,129,063 Archives
  • Birth & Marriages
  • Arrests & legal notices
  • And so much more
Issue Date:
Pages Available: 44

Search All United States newspapers

Research your ancestors and family tree, historical events, famous people and so much more!

Browse U.S. Newspaper Archives

Select the state you are looking for from the map or the list below

OCR Text

Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - June 26, 1974, Lethbridge, Alberta LETHBRIDGE June When glacier meets mountain the results are 'raw drama9 Up in the remote, raw wilderness country of extreme northwest British Columbia, the Tweedsmuir Glacier is on the move. This 100-mile-long glacier heads about 40 miles inside the Kluane National Park in the Yukon Territory and runs down a wide ice-carved valley southeast into British Columbia to a point about seven miles south of the Yukon-B.C. border. Photos, story by ANDY RUSSELL, Special to The Herald At its head there is the huge ice cap that straddles the Alaska Yukon border about a hundred miles wide and thousands of feet deep. Icy spectacle FOOD VALUES KOOL-AIO Presweelenad BUNS Wiener or Hamburger. McGavins, Pkg. of 8 FAB Powder Detergent Slb.box DILL PICKLES BICK'S POLISH 32oz............ 10 SWEET MIX PICKLES< BICK'S 32oz................. TIN MILK TOPVALU 16oz....... COFFEE MATE CARNATION 16oz............ MARSHMALLOWS KRAFT. Large White. 11 oz.......... SWEET RELISH HEINZ !2oz............ Sugar Frosted Flakes A( KELLOGG S. 18 oz........ Uw Perky Dog Food, 25 oz. Charcoal Briquettes GRILL TIME lOlb.bag m Fresh from our DAIRY DEPT. CHEEZ WHIZ KRAFT 16oz................. SdUEEZE-A-SNACK SHARP MDOMON 8 oz................ CHEESE SLICES KRAFT. Canadian Singles. 16 oz........... iNSTANf COFFEE NABOB 6 oz. 109 Large photo shows "on-rushing" Tweedsmuir Glacier as it "surges" across the Alsek River to collide with mountain causing an arch feet high. In inset at up- per left river's swirling force has loosened mas- sive column of ice from the glacier's 500-foot high face (higher than the Cal- ?ary Tower) toppling it into the river with thun- derous crashes that can be heard for miles (top right Lower inset shows tunnel that river has carved underneath the glacier into which fallen ice will flow. V5 LUNCHEON MEAT No deal URNSRov-AII llU UCCll BURNS Roy-All 12 oz. A with NDP FACIAL TISSUE SCOTTIES 200's Pink or While....... WAX REFILLS CUTRITE 100H........... BLEACH RED LEAF 64oz..... MEATS FOODS Mixed Vegetables TopVato2lb.pkfr Green Beans Shortcake MCWKIS Strawbefrj or BATHROOM TISSUE CASHMERE 6 Roll Pack 109 FRYING CHICKEN Fresh UfiHjWbote .......................fc. TURKEYS fi9C 10Its.) .................ll-WW BABY BEEF LIVER RIB STEAK 1W Canada Grade'A1 Beef .......................ft. PRODUCE A TJxwnwwn V UKArtO Green Ib. ORANGES 10' 29' ORANGE CRYSTALS SUNGOLD WATERMELON CABBAGEMp 1 CORN srr- LETTUCE TEA BAGS KADANA 100'9 PARSNIPS ONIONS No. 1 1 fb. pkg. Medium r 1516-9th Ave. S. Open daily 9 a.m. to 9 p.m Phone 327-2044 REGINA (CP) The president of the Conservative party. Michael Meighen. says that his party will not make deals with the NDP to permit a minority government to operate. Asked in an interview whether a minority Conservative government could co-exist with the NDP holding the balance of power. Mr. Meighen said "that's up to them." Mr. Meighen. -who is also a candidate in Montreal Westmount. said he is spending a quarter of his time visiting ridings across the country and what he has seen so far pleases him. He conceded that Justice Minister Otto Lang and New Democrat Lome Nystrom would probably retain their Saskatchewan seats, but said the Conservatives could make gains elsewhere in the province. He also predicted gains of six seats in British Columbia and seven to 12 in Quebec. He said Conservative efforts are directed mainly at Ontario "Ontario is where it's all at because a shift of one or two per cent there transfers into 10 seats." He also had harsh words for the CBC. calling it shocking that last week the television network gave only 24 seconds of announcer time on its national newscast to Conservative leader Robert Stanfield's Western tour while Liberals received 11 minutes. All around the great fangs of peaks stand, the highest being Mt. Logan, feet at its summit. At its tip, the glacier is about two miles across where it meets the Alsek River broadside and slams into a great mountain. There it is from 200 to 1000 feet deep. Ordinarily, the Tweedsmair Glacier flows slowly at a rate of only a few yards each year, but last fall due to weight or some other quirk of nature, it began to gallop. In earlier stages of its surging glaciologists estimated its rate of speed at three meters a day a very high rate of speed for such a mass involving billions and billions of tons of ice. But their points of reference have now disappeared, so its present rate of speed is unknown, but it seems to have accelerated and is now running at more than three meters a day. Naturally, the forces involved when such a tremendous ice mass moving at such a rate collides with a mountain are beyond human comprehension. For it is colliding with a mountain face on the east bank of the Alsek River and the results are cataclysmic. For a while it dammed the Alsek making a lake, but then the river carved a tunnel under the natural arch set up by the pressure against the mountain. So now, when the ice comes marching down the opposite slope to the river, the forces of the water running swift, deep and about 200 yards wide, carve relentlessly at its 500-foot face toppling great columns colored in white, emerald green and grey into the river with thunderous crashes that can be heard for miles. My wife Kay, assistant Jill Pangman and I flew into the area with our equipment and pitched our tents on a bluff overlooking the river near the north end of the ice face fronting on the far edge of the water. For four days, we had ringside seats where we could watch the never-ending battle between the glacier, the mountain and the river. It was raw drama written in a language few have ever heard or witnessed. At night we were wakened by the booming cannonades of falling ice hitting the river with such force that the ground trembled under our sleeping bags. During the day we climbed up across the face of the mountain to three carefully-chosen filming locations. There we worked our cameras. Directly in front of us the great slabs and columns of ice were toppling into the river some 20 to 40 feet across and 500 feet high. Twice when we were perched 300 feet above the river, we were doused with spray from the tremendous splashes. The falling icebergs set up a great turmoil of waves that sometimes washed up on the cliffs as much as 20 feet. Behind us the warm sun and vibrations caused rocks to fall off the mountain adding to our problems. It was not the kind of place where anyone could make too many mistakes. Our climbing experience and the natural contours of the mountain enabled us to work with reasonable safety. In 50 years of extensive rambling among mountains this was the greatest show put on by nature that this writer has ever seen. It was on such a grand scale, that perspectives tended to get lost in the display. The noise of it was often beyond one's ears to register. It is fortunate that the battleground is located far from the nearest road, for otherwise inexperienced people coming to watch the spectacle would be in grave danger. To get too low on the mountain would be to invite getting hit by falling ice or washed off the cliff face. Even if one slipped and fell into the river uninjured, there would be no chance to stay alive for more than two or three minutes as the temperatures are just over freezing. Unless one knows something of mountains the danger from falling rock is a real menace. A few people are flying in to view it from the air about the safest way to do it. It is a place where a man is a minute living speck in the midst of a huge stage where inanimate masses of measureless force are mixing in a cauldron of action. There man is forcibly reminded that there are forces in nature over which he has absolutely no control. The best to you from Palm. Sour Cream. PRLM PALM DAIRIES LIMITED BUILDING MATERIALS MANAGER An aggressive person is required to Manage Sales and Service of the Building Materials and Construction Oe.pt. at Taber. High Sales Volume with excellent Growth Potential This position offers an excellent opportunity for advancement. Complete Benefit package included. APPLY TO: R. Dyken Southern Altorli Co-Op Uthbridge Phone 329-0017 ;