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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - July 29, 1974, Lethbridge, Alberta fwiy Peaceful Cyprus outcome mainly luck Language bill Emotion has been running high in Quebec over the language bill now in passage through the legislature Attempts to prevent the bill from becom- ing law have been doomed from the out- set oecause of the overwhelming majori- ty commanded by the Bourassa government In view of this tact it has been a mistake to invoke stalling tactics because they have simply prevented the bill from receiving the sort of committee consideration that could have resulted in an improved bill The bill comes as the culmination of the struggle to gain recognition of the French fact Despite all the effort to im- prove the status of the French language in the disconcerting truth is that ground has been lost Only the drastic ac- tion ot legal coercion seems able to arrest the slippage and preserve the French language There are concerns that the Quebec- bill may contravene the Canadian Bill ot Rights and might not accord with the spirit of the federal Official Languages Act These points will undoubtedly be tested in court by private citizens Prime Minister Trudeau has alluded to the possibility that the federal govern- ment might intervene on behalf of those private citizens taking the province to court This would be regrettable It could have very adverse effects on relations between Quebec and the rest of the country just at the time when the threat ot separatism seems to have diminished The language issue needs to be settled in and will be A proper attitude in the rest of Canada is one ot sympathy for the aim of safeguarding the French language and hope that it might be ac- complished without too much dislocation in Quebec Astronomical salaries There is little doubt about North American values being askew as com- mentator Carl Rowan observes in his piece elsewhere on this page This is not because street cleaners in San Francisco will soon be better paid than teachers but because athletes and entertainers receive such astronomical incomes as to be incomparable to people in other walks of life Even those who enjoy sports and enter- tainment of various kinds as U S Senator Robert C Byrd recently observ- ed in a Senate are becoming un- easy about this situation It can't help but distort peoples' outlook ahd be disturbing to their sense of contentment Much of the unrest evident in society today could stem from observing the great gulf between what most people earn and what a tew are able to command Of course athletes and entertainers are able to demand their high salaries because the public is willing to pay what is charged by the promoters who then pay the performers Until the time comes that people refuse to go along with high admission prices nothing will change Clearly it is the general state of affluence that creates this condition When times are tough there is a tendency to eschew professional entertainment and provide one's own A nagging suspicion intrudes into the current inquiry that sports for instance has become a kind of religion substitute In that case it may be fruitless to inveigh against lavish incomes for athletes and entertainers because it is characteristic in religion for the gods to receive such homage The best solution Dandelions and pigeons have little in common except as but both have appeared on the Iront page of the Wall Street Journal recently While the newspaper didn t exactly offer up the colorful dandelion as an answer to today s food orices and shor- tages it did extol the virtues of the ubi- quitous plant all of whose parts are edi- ble m one form or another Spring leaves can be eaten in salads while later growth can be cooked like spinach or dried tor tea Blossoms produce wine and can even be trench tried tor an unusual dish And the long tap root can be ground and made into coffee Some health food stores handle dandelion products and according to the Journal a major seed wholesaler in the U S actually sells about 4 000 packets of dandelion seeds annually The dandelion story originated in Chicago The pigeon on the other hand came from Quebec City where the citv administration is struggling un- successfully with the birds as is their custom elsewhere frequent public buildings and monuments When the city erected a complex of stark modern of- fice for some reason the pigeons shitted their allegiance to the new quarters making them even more unsightly than the old ones In an attempt to do something about this the city spent in building Complex a sleek bird tower designed to accommodate 1 000 occupants This had solved the pigeon problem in they were told Quebec however are a more stubborn breed and after surveying the new complex where every apartment has its own balcony and heat and light are they returned to the office buildings It is1 evident in light ot the two stones that the Quebecois have been using the approach and that the usually pragmatic French have something to learn Irom the Americans in the way of practical solutions to problems of com- mon pests II you can t fight eat them ERIC NICOL The art of sports More Canadians attend pertormances of the arts than go to sports events we re told It so how come tnere isn t a TV round up of arts news between the regular news and the weather' How come the newspaper prints two pages of sports news for everv one about theatre' How come Abe Klosky rs not voted the most valuable player of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra and presented with a new sports car' There s a big fat anomaly running amok here If Canada s arts fans are legion why is Robertson Davres not invited to accept a handsome fee to appear in a television com- mercial for a power saw' Why is there meagre interest in the amateur diaft for the Winnipeg Ballet' Show me a kid eager to trade his Jean Gascon card for a Farley Mowat After giving the matter serious thought for several minutes I have concluded that what makes for less interest in the despite the higher is that they don't provide as many fights Fights that the audience can that is It is not realistic to expect the Canadian public schooled by hockey and football to become equally excited about a ballerina giv- ing her partner an occasional knee in the groin The brutal fact is that people dote much less on the performer who does not remove his dental bridge before he starts to play This is why the Dominion drama Festival has fallen behind the Stanley Cup in terms of attention Even Stompm' Tom Connors doesn't stomp anything much but the floor Very rarely does the conversation in the or the barber shop revolve around the of hits scored by the artistic lirector of a regional theatre Why' Because lobody has seen him try to handle Dave Schuitz The result is that the attendance graph of the arts is not matched by the measure of their hold on the public The arts are not without their dramatic confrontations it s true For instance during the rehearsal of a stage play of mine I had a fight with the male director But as fights go if wasn t ready for the Spectrum in Philadelphia The director was a hspy moun- tain of flesh whose main tactic in a fight was to burst into tears Since my own style con- sisted of karate chops at the a video tape replay would not have caught much ex- cept the lurchings of ritual combat I suspect that the arts in Canada will not ex- ert the same gut appeal as sports till the CBC and the rest of the press send special teams to cover cultural events as thoroughly as they do sports Th's means doing frank interviews with the actor who hates the author for cutting his with the opera s coloratura soprano who is going for her 715th career C above high C This season the CBC did televise the presentation of awards by the Association of Canadian Radio and Television but the occasion lacked pizzaz possibly because it was preceded by Kate Smith singing God Bless America Such integration of the artistic with the athletic to the benefit of Doth in public atten- tion had a fainy successful run in the Olym- pic Games of ancient Greece When the contestants wear no clothes it seems to be easier to synthesize art and sport as engross- ing spectacle Whether the Montreal Games have a place lor the Stratford Strolling I can t say But don t be you young artists The arts may fifl more seats than do in this but not nearly as many pockets By Joseph syndicated commentator WASHINGTON at his couldn t have put together a moie clever ending than the outcome which now emerges from the Cyprus crisis But that rs not to say that Henry Kissinger was manipulating events all along On the the evidence shows luck and im- provisation at especial- ly here in Washington So while celebrating the it is also useful to identify the weaknesses which caused the ciisis to erupt in the first place The most notable develop- ment to come out of the Cyprus crisis is the change of regime in Greece The wild men headed by Brigadier General Dimitnos loannides set in motion the attempt to take over have been ousted by senior generals grouped around the com- mander on the Turkish loanms Davas A civilian regime is being set up under former Prime Minister Constantine Karamanhs Mr Karamanhs is probably as good a leader as anybody corld hope for in Greece Thus at one str oke the world is rid ot a wild man whose actions threatened stability and Greece has a chance to start anew in building a liberal regime in harmony with her European and American allies What has happened in Cvprus is onlv a little less remarkable Nikos the murdeious scoundrel who acted as pioxv tor the wild men in Greece to push Aichbishop President Makanos from office has himself been torced from power The new Cvpnot leader Glafkos Clendes has strong support in the Greek com- munity on the island There is at least a chance that he will replace Aichbishop Makanos who is certainly not the most steady ot leaders Moreover Mr Clendes has Harvey can't decide whether to be a nuclear a physio-biochemist or a street-sweepei Sweepers shake up U.S. caste system By Carl T. syndicated commentator WASHINGTON What' Pay some joker 000 a year to sweep streets and gutters9 Such cries of disbelief have leverberated around the country ever since it was revealed that San Francisco s 23C street cleaners will rake in 17 000 bucks a year starting next June because a provision of the city charter ties the sweepers salaries to those of construction and other in dustnal workers The only thing louder than the cries of outrage from par- tolmen teachers and others who earn less has been the clamor for sweeping jobs from people who previously wouldn t touch a broom with a 10 toot handle San Francisco's Mayor Joseph Ahoto is talking about the obvious inequity' of the city charter provision and a lot of people hope and pray that somebody will find a legal way to put street sweeping back in its lowly place before pay soars from the present to Well I tor hope the sweepers get tneir 000 It will be a marvelous start toward shaking up our crazy caste system of deciding who can be paid how much for do- ing what Anyone who has been to In dra knows that sweeper is way down at the un touchable end of the caste system While we would deny practicing such non sense the simple truth is that we do We assume that sweep- ing streets is a dirty degrading job and that anybody doing it must be a sort ol derelict The same for garbage men Well rt s trme we were forc- ed to do a bit ol thinking about the need to pay people on the basis of the value of services rendered We concede that doctors ought tc make a lot ot money because they protect our health keep us alive But street sweepers and garbage men also protect our health What s they protect it daily whereas the good doctor only occasionally strikes a blow lor our longevity But think of the difference in training between the doctor and the street someone suggests A very valid argument up to the point where we start pretending that level of education and time spent getting it is the dominant fac- tor in determrmng pay in this country Every time Frank Sinatra opens his mouth to speak rather than sing he makes it clear that the truant officer failed to catch him on too many cccasrons He runs around this and the world calling women reporters whores and generally revealing hrmself to be a crude uneducated bore Yet Sinatra earns in a night wlhat that San Francisco sweeper will earn in a year That s show biz of but it sure has nothing to do with our need of services rendered I ve spent many an hour over the years Irstening to Old Blue Eyes croon es- pecially in the years before he became lat and foolish But I say Categorically that Ida darn sight sooner give up my Sinatra albums than lose those Monday and Thursday gar bage prckups Okay so you say that the teachers who rnstruct our chrldren and the policemen who keep our communitres safe provide services just as valuable as the street sweepers7 Granted And peo- ple who truly feel that way ought to launch mrghty cam paigns to pay the teachers and policemen more The goal must not be to hold street sweepers in poverty so the misery of teachers will seem bearable But a lot of elected officials could wind up earning less than street cleaners someone complains True But some of- ficials specialize in dishing out garbage and they ought to earn less than those who clean il up 1 believe tnat class strife is one ot the curses of this society and that we ve found a marvelous though tiny open- ing to a cure when college giads artists start fighting to get street sweeping jobs It may lower the quality of street cleaning but it will raise the level of respect we all have lor those who do the vrtal jobs we call the dirty work LETTER been the Greek Cypnot most noted tor willingness to negotiate with the Turkish minor itv on the island Thus he might open the way lor a communal settlement follow- ecl bv replacement ol both Greek and Turkish forces on Cvprus with a United Nations contingent The one good guv to. sutler in the crisis is the Turkish prime minister Bulent Ecevit The invasion torce the Tuiks sent to im- mediatelv after Makanos was lorced out did not store a military success Though the invasion was launched under pressure ot the Tui kish armed lorces it is possible that Mr Kcevit will have to pav the price lot the inglorious adventure But even it he is torced oui the Turkish militarv are evidently on maintaining civilian government So militarv dic- tatorship could piohablv oe avoided in Turkey The happv ending ha-- alreadv combined with a favorite Washington mvth to build the that Secretary or State Rrssinger planned the whole thing all along That is demonstrablv not the case Some 10 davs before the anti Makanos coup in Cvprus American intelligence of- ficials in Athens were inform ed bv the loannides regime tnat such a move was in the offing The Americans sensed that loannides was testing thc'ir reaction and cabled Washington with a request lor guidance Guidance never came presumably because the president the secretary ot state and all other hign of licials were too busv with other matters the beginning at least the highest American officials were disposed to support the coup Secretary Kissinger appears to have had tor tne Greek colonels thp ex- aggerated respect he usuallv shows tor military regimes It was the plav ol events which to the change in Greece not the reiarv of state Indeed when LJr Kissinger last weekend at j press briefing gave scant credit to President Nixon the vAhrte House shot back bv cir- word that whatever ihe secretary ol influence on events in Turkey it was Undersecretary State Joseph Sisco who had done the good work in Athens The point ot all this is that nobody certainlv no American oflicial can take all the credit And if anybody tries the happv ending which may be too good to be irue will certainly turn sour Normal woman's role THE CASSEROLE Setting a splendid example of respect for individual rights to the Alberta College of Physicians and Surgeons announc- ed in Edmonton the other day that it planned to examine an unnamed doctor behind closed doors in connection with a series of the details of which would not be disclosed Canadians do a lot of complaining about the postal service but if the Italians started to protest they would have some tall stories to tell Recently Italian paper mills discovered that waste paper bought from the govern- ment for pulping was really mail including registered parcels and old-age pen- sion cheques Women today as a group are not fully content with their lot They seem to be reaching for more less and more appreciation and making a bid for much broader accomplishment in the world Women have in the past and present shown themselves to be capable of dorng most of the things which help make our world tick as well or near- ly so as men and for better or worse they are now es- tablishing themselves on a course calculated and intend- ed to bring them equality with men in accomplrshment In mv view the emergence of such organizations as our local Women s Place could be another manifestation of the broader state of affairs in society today where much of what it currently experiences is due to nolhmg more than forgetfulness For the new morality is in the final analysis nothing more than a forgetting of the ageless morality In this concept of yvhen uumeii generally forget what womanhood and femininity is all about we see the unique situation in which they begin to behave out character and from what I have seen so tar of women do rng men s work for prolonged periods it does seem to have a coarsenrng effect nol appropriate to feminmrty and therefore not acceptable Ostensibly when women lose their self-identity this must by all means be and I believe that it shall be in one way or another I see in organizations such as Women's Place a setting foot upon the path that shall not project them into the un- familiar and probably for- bidden world of men but rather bring them full circle around and back to the true and permanent role of all that a woman inherently is in her normal and untroubled state In all concerned women of the city and district are not only welcome but re- quested to attend the weekly meetings in the hope that collectively the new and purposes of today's women can be more effectively and rapidly realized LLOYD WEIGHTMAN Lethbrrdge Thomas professor of psychiatry at the State University of New has a knack of putting an old cliche in new perspec- tive To quote proverb warns that you should not bite the hand that feeds you But maybe you if it prevents you from feeding yourself The charming Barbie doll has recently celebrated her 16th birthday The costly which can be outfitted with wardrobe and house dune buggy and air- has some attraction for little girls that parents have been trying to understand since it was introduced in 1958 The U S Justice Department has laid charges against a state bar association for conspiracy stabilize and main- tain fees charged for rendering legal ser- vices The betting is that the case won't come to trial because the lawyers probably will follow the advice of the American Bar like their colleagues in 16 other and jettison their schedule of minimum which the government claims is contrary to anti-trust legislation Consider- ing how often Canada adopts U S it will be interesting to see how this affects and other professional fee schedules in this country The Lethbridge Herald 504 7th SI S Lethbndge Alberta LtTHBRIDGE HERALD CO LTD Proprietors and Publishers Second Class Mall Reglstialion No 0012 CLEO MOWERS Editor and Publisher DON H PILLING Managing Editor DONALD R DORAM General Manager ROY F MILES Advertising Manager DOUGLAS K WALKER Editorial Page Editor ROBERT M FENTON Circulation Manager KENNETH E BARNETT Business Manager HERALD SERVES THE ;