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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - July 17, 1974, Lethbridge, Alberta LETHBRIDGE July NDP more effective in social reform Police restraint Since the over-riding impression of U S law enforcement officers is that they are the outcome of the recent drama in the basement cellblock of a courthouse in DC is of interest In this instance a remarkable restraint was evident that provides a useful corrective to the notion that the only way to deal with desperate and potentially violent people is to open gunfire on them The most amazing aspect of the whole affair was the way Deputy Federal Marshal Calvin L one of the cooly refrained from taking ad- vantage of carelessness on the part of the two captors in leaving guns within reach He reasoned that such a move could only result in bloodshed Moulton devised a plan of escape which was successful Perhaps this happy outcome was un- usual but there is a body of opinion that holds that there would be more such resolutions of bad situations if there was less inclination to deal with violence by violence This view will gain some rein- forcement from the Washington incident who have always ex- perienced greater restraint in the use of firearms' on the part of their will be relieved by this example There has been a fear that the shoot-out approach so consistently depicted on TV might prove contagious and become a North American phenomenon instead of being a U S abomination A useful counter influence has been provided Cover-up at the UN While a report was being presented to the United Nations Human Rights Com- mission last March a strange kind of cover up came to light The report was presented uy ihe subcommittee on the Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities and was to reach a definition of genocide The delegates of United States Austria Nigeria Tunis Romania and Iraq proposed to delete a short passage in the report referring to the Armenian genocide in Turkey during the First World War Despite the fact that historians of the stature of Lord Bryce and Arnold Toynbee have recorded the fate of the Armenians and that the archives of foreign ministries and the international press abound with reference to the atrocities with which the extermination of the Armenian population within the Ottoman Empire was carried the most complete genocide ot its time was to be wiped off the records because of a few handshakes That Turkey the principal perpetrator of the said genocide was trying to hide this well known historical crime is un- derstandable but that countries like the United States and whose statesmen at the time condemned the massacre of the should succumb to the lobby- ing of the Turks casts a shadow on the integrity and humanitarian principles of the above delegates It can only be assumed that the delegates of these nations gave their sup- port to Turkey because of some ulterior interest Perhaps they anticipated a similar hush up favor in return at some future time Perhaps the atrocities com- mitted by other nations to their minorities during the Second World War and those still being committed in this enlightened age and time makes the Armenian incident appear less significant But the suppression of truth has never made right the wrongs of inhumanity or healed the sores of mankind On the contrary it has only lead to worse crimes Furthermore if tamper- ing with well known historical facts is considered possible because of political susceptibilities then this casts doubts on the commission s ability to produce work of a scientific nature That tins should happen at the very centre where truth and justice are to be upheld is not only highly disillusioning but defeats the very principles of the United Nations THE CASSEROLE Confused about the oil supply situation9 Don t feel too badly The other day the same issue of the Edmonton Journal contained three articles that quoted the president of Gulf Oil the Federal Power Commission and the president of Shell Oil respectively as follows is doubtful the industry will be able to meet this country s needs fuel supply is tight and even a slight disruption could produce power shortages this combination of consumer price resistance and increased foreign oil production is causing a world-wide peholeum surplus Company the Canadian fur giant that found- ed its fortune on beaver had to go to the United States to obtain three black beavers it had promised the Toronto zoo Add another item to the of Inflation' list According to the president of Telecredit Inc a loss prevention and recovery losses from bad cheques in North America run to about a billion dollars a year A Reuters dispatch says that Prime Minister Indira Gandhi of India fell off a horse and hurt her finger Her finger9 There was a sad little story on the Canadian Press wire the other day The Hudson's Bay Brave cries of car men automobile sales are down New motor vehi- cle sales in Canada for the first four months of 1974 totalled a drop of 3 4 per cent from the same period last year Passenger car sales are especially discouraging In April they totalled a drop of 10 4 per cent from last year's ERIC NICOL The new money Don't mistake it for a warned the checkout handing me one of the new bills in change At once a light bulb appeared over my head The cashier added it to her but it was worth it I suddenly understood why the Bank of Canada has issued this note to prepare us for the fact that the bill is now worth one buck Except for the the new bill and the bill both olive-green are vir- tually indistinguishable As with the nickel and the cash is being homogenized Why9 Because we fast approach the day when money literally is not worth the paper it is printed on out latest issue of legal tender bears a flattering portrait of the Queen She has got rid of the green pox that afflicted her on the old dollar As every schoolboy Her Majesty contracted the spots in an effort to foil who apparently can handle all the other details of reproduction but fall about foaming and moaning when they try to make the monarch break out in the rash Indeed the Queen looks more youthful than she does on the old bill The Bank of Canada has reversed the sorcerous aging of The Picture of Dorian Gray It may hear from Prince Philip The same rejuvenated portrait of H M. will appear on the new bill When Sir John A Macdonald is pictured wearing his baby we'll know that ours is a cash flow into the toidy Any remaining doubt about the diminished value of the new bill is dispelled by the pic- ture on the back of the note the prairie scene has been replaced by a view of Parliament Hill As seen from the pulp mill across the river It is difficult to discern the hour indicated on the Clock but we may assume that it is later than we think In die foreground a couple of tugs are try- ing to contend with what looks like a broken boom Somebody in the Treasury Board has a macabre sense of humor all the symbolism is in the new to presage the decline of cash and the total victory of the credit card For the first time I see the full significance of the word UN on the bill the Un-cola. now the Un-dollar It goes down natural-like Regardless of how true is the rumor that the contract tor printing Canadian bills has been given to the Grand Paper Napkin Com- pany of plastic coins will soon change our pocket's jingle to a death rattle The dime and nickel are following the four-bit piece into and tills are barren of the copper-bearing penny Burglars use folding money to wipe off fingerprints What they're looking for is your com collection If they find the housekeeping money in an old silver sugar they toss away the bills and take the bowl Twenty years ago people were impressed by a roll of bills big enough 'o choke a horse Five years ago the horse became a hip- popotamus Last the Holland Tunnel carrying a roll of bills large enough to impress people is not worth hiring the flat- bed truck to haul it Remember when a man showed off by lighting his cigar with a dollar bill7 Now he's just saving on lighter fluid Head waiters shun him as a cheapie. This is why I look at the new bill that looks like a bill and say to the Queen's pic- ture a nice girl like you doing in a print like By W. A. Montreal Star commentator OTTAWA-Like the Con- the New Democrats have post-election problems to consider which go far beyond any issue of leadership The individual campaigns of New Democratic candidates must have varied as much as those of other aspirants in the but by far the strongest impression left by the party's national campaign was that a rather scrappy and incomplete economic position had been allowed to crowd out social policy It is far from as some people that all Cana- dian social developments have been pre-empted from the NDP by their political rivals A very much larger part of the parentage can actually be found in the work done in London in 1941-42 by Bevendge's inter-govern- mental committee on social insurance and allied services Lord was not a was a which was probably one factor that made his pro- posals for sweeping social re- forms acceptable to the governments of Mackenzie Louis St Laurent and L B Pearson The contribution of the New and the CCF wnich preceded the present was much more as campaigners and agitators for reform There is nothing par- ticularly original about Mr Knowles' ideas in for but it would be a silly observer of Parliament and society who denied the great impact of his constant work on behalf of better con- ditions for the retired The importance of the New Democrats in the acceptance of new social policy has been far greater than any influence they have had on economic policy There is a reason for this After the depression of the Thirties and the world Canada was prepared for ma- jor social developments Liberal and New Democratic thinking on these subjects was not far disagreements were much more over tuning and the perennial question of how much the country could afford at any given time. After some early the especially once John Diefenbaker became their joined the same general stream on the issue of for a time moved well ahead of the Liberals the CCF professed a high degree of socialism and even after the changes of the 1960s the par- ty's orientation remained somewhat in that direction New Democrats would insist vigorously that they are David Lewis among them Others might insist on the term but provide a pretty modest definition of what it per cent of Detente needed for small sore spots By C L New York Times commentator PARIS I cannot unders- tand why the United so earnestly seeking detente with all the important power pays so little apparent atten tion to small sores festering along the edges One would think a nation resolved to work out accom- modations with the the the Arabs and those Europeans with whom we have had a tendency to would also take the tiny steps required to regularize other quarrels on a miniature scale Specifically I have in mind the continuing Cold War between the United States and Cuba which doesn't seem to have much point in an era of relaxing and also the continuing failure to arrange diplomatic relations with those two small but strategically located Outer Mongolia and Albania Cuba is the most crucial of the three nations mentioned because of its relationships to continental its Caribbean position and prox- imity to the Panama its association with anti-U S propaganda and guerrilla movements and its symbolic implication as the locus of the nuclear age's greatest superpower confron- tation A decade ago I asked Fidel Castro if he foresaw improve- ment of relations He said question depends on the relations of the United States with all socialist countries and we are not interested in im- proving relationships for ourselves alone We now receive aid from only one side for the simple reason that there is only one side to help us It is practical- ly impossible that the United States should help us because the United States would de- mand ideological concessions and we will never be prepared to make concessions of that sort think it will require many years before diplomatic relations are restored I don't think conditions exist in the United States that permit positive steps I believe an im- provement of relations must be regarded as a longterm af- fair Yet have now passed U S relations with virtually socialist have improved No ideological concessions' one excepts our suggestions that the Soviet Union ease up on dissidents and would-be have been demanded the hatred has seeped out of Washington Havana debates Fidelismo is no longer regarded as an im- mediate menace to Latin America And Moscow doesn't hke indefinitely financing the sagging Cuban economy The mini crisis of 1970-1971 over a reported Soviet sub- marine base at Cienfuegos has subsided into a cat-and-mouse game where each side Letters toys with the other One would therefore think this is a propitious time to do something useful Indeed the state department has quietly set in motion steps for change But the hard truth is that so long as Bebe Rebozo remains President Nixon s intimate the department doubts whether it can ever get a White House go-ahead for serious negotiations Rebozo is closely tied to some par- ticularly vociferous anti Castro refugees around Miami and Nixon is said to feel very deeply on the Cuban affair Ericksen statement Alberta can look forward to being a doormat for Ontario and Quebec for the next four years if Sven Encksen's state- ment after his defeat can be taken as Liberal policy Mr Ericksen suggested there was nothing that 19 Tories could do in Ottawa He stated Liberals owe nothing to Alberta During his campaign he repeatedly avowed his love for all of Canada and his desire to see all Canadians treated fairly and equally only minutes after realizing that the elec- torate had rejected he suddenly no longer cared about all of Canada I should think Prime Minister Trudeau has a greater responsibility to Alberta than any other province As Alberta has no representation in the federal it is up to Mr Trudeau the prime minister of all Canada I might remind Mr to guarantee Albertans the benefits and rights that all Canadians enjoy I'm certainly glad we didn't count on Mr Ericksen to stand up for Alberta in Ot- tawa BRIAN MULHOLLAND Claresholm No special favors I must congratulate The Herald on the editorial July in which it is pointed out that Quebec is not the recipient of special favors from the federal government This Kind of thing is sym- bolic of the sick propaganda used by certain politicians in their endeavor to secure votes regardless of the evil effect it may have in the west i too am a western Canadian who has spent the greater part of his life in western Canada but I have also been in both Quebec and Ontario enough to find that the people there are just as kind and honest and friendly as any in the world It is very unfortunate that there are bigots in this otherwise pleasant country who through misinformation cause discord for their own purposes and take advantage of the situation to spread their poison among those who are not informed and who are therefore prepared to blame anyone for a real or imagined disadvantage It is to be hoped that reasonably aware people will not dllow themselves to be misled by those in this province who are prepared to present any phony argument in order to further their own ends G D LEE Milk River Thousands of miles distant from this impasse are the separate but equal cases of Albania and Outer Mongolia They are equal as favored clients respectively of the Chinese and Soviet governments Peking does everything it can to help its only true Euro- pean ally while Moscow makes massive use of the Mongols by among other stuffing their broad land with military equipment and Soviet troops with which to menace China the logical thing is for Washington to use the pre- sent quest for global detente to simultaneously open diplomatic relations with each of these thus balancing Moscow's pleasure at our recognition of Mongolia with Soviet displeasure at our recognizing Albania and the reverse for Peking The two weak nations in question are politically and strategically of great interest as observation points for the United States From American diplomats might sniff from a new vantage additional information about Soviet machinations against neighboring Yugoslavia And from Mongolia they might be in a better position to check ten- sion along the Smo-Soviet frontier and the seriousness of Moscow's intentions against Peking both in the name of detente very much the mot d'ordre nowadays and in the name of diplomatic horse it might be well to start talks with all three of the countries mentioned with a view of regularizing what remains a foolishly irregular situation means The who real- ly were of course got pushed out From the Se- cond World War on Canada has been quite ready to insist wide range of social im- provements but it has not been inclined towards socialism The country presented the interesting contrast of being mildly leftist in its social policy ap- proaches and very conser- vative in almost all of its economic ones The New there- have been a far more effective party in one area than the other If they had depended politically upon their approaches to economic rather than social policy it is a safe assessment that their future would have been entire- ly different and that the par'y would never have secured the position it has enjoyed in re- cent years In 1972 the New Democrats' national cam- paign became strongly oriented towards the side ot largely because David Lewis secured an unex- pected degree of public interest and attention with his attacks on one aspect of Cana- dian taxation policy It was a remarkable tour de-force By over-simplifying effectively probably justifiably in this he secured an. unex pected degree of debate on an intricate and controversial aspect of our taxation struc ture It was a major accom- plishment David Lewis is a fine parlia- mentarian one of a tiny group of truly top-flight House of Commons men the country has seen in our time But it is doubtful that he is nearly as good a politician and in this campaign he seemed to have become trapped by the sur- prising success of his 1972 tac tics Like Mr he ac cepted the economic issue as the central of the elec tion He was effective in his attacks upon the Conser- vatives at the beginning of the but his positive approach never seemed to have much impact Essen he was arguing that inflation could very largely be explained in terms of one group in society ripping off an- other This is far too sim the Tory Lewis ran up against a more sophisticated electorate than he was allowing for There probably is quite a bit of profiteering going on in the midst of this inflation But to seize on it as an explanation for a worldwide problem is far too close in its intellectual quality to the least satisfying of all explanations of high un employment that the work force has suddenly suffered an attack of mass laziness and could find jobs if it just wanted to Both belong to the art of demonology not political and economic analysis In selecting economic issues for their most recent national the New Democrats are choosing the area where the public is least likely to accept their ideas We have reach- ed the socially ideal condition There are still problems to be solved As New Demociats ponder their party s they should think seriously about a significant de- velopment Everybody has some failing just happens to be great big feet' The Lethbridge Herald 504 7th St S Leihbndge Alberta LETHBRIDGE HERALD CO LTD Proprietors and Publishers Second Class Mail Registration No 0013 CLEO MOWERS Editor and Publisher DON H PILLING Managing Editor DONALD R DORAM General Manager ROY F MILES Advertising Manager DOUGLAS K WALKER Editorial Page Editor ROBERT M FENTON Circulation Manager KENNETH E BARNETT Business Manager HERALD SERVES THE ;