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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - July 11, 1972, Lethbridge, Alberta 12 THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD Tueiday, July 11, When you run ad ii 1HNOOK" "SOUTHERN ALBERTA'S LARGEST RURAL CIRCULATION PUBLICATION" People Will... 1. Read it 2. Think about it 3. Understand it 4. Read it again 5. Show it to someone else 6. Cut it out 7. Clip your coupon 8. See pictures of your products 9. Be attracted by compelling color 10. And buy from it NOW...Let's See Your ELECTRONIC Commercial Beat That! For further information regarding Grculation and Advertising Rates Just Call 328-4411 and a fully qualified Lethbridge Herald Display Advertising Salesman will go to work for you The Lethbridge Herald "Serves Tlie South" POT-LUCK By D'ARCY R1CKARD My daughter Nicolinc, 9, loves horses. When she sees me coming home from work, walk- ing up the street, she runs to me and. insists I carry her home on my shoulders. Nicoline thinks of me as a horse. Now that she's getting older, and heavier, and somewhat wider, I'm thinking it's time to get her a horse, a real horse. It gets to you, after a while, to have a kid running up to you with a handful of grass. Nicolme loves Morgan horses, Appaloosa horses, Palomino horses, Arabian horses, Quarter horses, Shetland pony horses, white horses, black horses and horses that go neigh in the night. Frankly, this girl has to have her own horse. And soon. I don't relish the idea of riding downtown with her to go shopping for saddle blankets. She does the riding. How many girls insist on tying their dads up to a parking meter? Nicky is always drawing horses. I keep telling her that horses aren't really all that romantic. At Birdseye Ranch I used to get stepped on by horses, kicked by horses, nibbled by horses, tossed off by horses and bumped about something horribly by horses. I have no illusions about the damned nags. One particularly ignoble creature I used to have to saddle up used to run like crazy as soon as you put one foot in the stirrup. This little black, half- shetland used to take off like a bowling ball going down a laundry chute. There was no way to hold him in or make him go around in circles. He could run sideways faster than Riva Ridge on the way to the barn. I got so I was scared to get off to open a gate and scared to try to get back on. Kim Hanson told me about a horse that ran backwards. Kim was trying to break him. "Now that s not a natural thing for a horse to do, run said Kim. "I had to let him run backwards all the way up to the cow pasture. Then I had to let him run backwards all the way home." I guess they had a heck of a time with him. Couldn't tell if he was coming in or going out. Another horse, old Smokey, had a long neck. Loping along, he'd inspect all the gopher holes. I got to thinking maybe he was near-sighted. Then I found out he was a Conservative and highly tuned to grass roots politics. Well, dear Nicoline, horses are highly intelligent animals, let me tell you. Peepers, the horse with the glass eye like myself, was the brightest horse I've ever known, especially when the sun reflected off his phony orb. And a special goodnight to Gary May and Scotty, Maxine and Creamo, Uncle Max and Pedro, Uncle Charles and Trapper, Dean Harker and Major and Tom Mix'and Tony, the Wonder Horse. Beef tenderness linked to acidity "How tender is the used to be a question that could only be answered satisfactorily with knife and fork at the din- ner table. But scientists now are coming to Uie aid of the harried shopper. Scientists at the National Re- scnrch Council have developed a grading method that will per- mit the meat industry to iden- tify the tender from the lough. Even the best quality meat can lack uniformity in tender- ness, says an article in tho council's journal, Science Dim- ension. Two steers from the samo herd, raised under similar con- ditions, slaughtered at the samo lime, processed in the same way, graded similarly and aged under identical conditions still might show vast differences in tenderness in resulting steaks. Dr. A. W, Khan, who has been working on the problem for two years at the council's Ottawa laboratories, has found that car- casses can be graded for ten- derness by using a device that measures acidity in the meat. This is done immediately after the animal has been slaughter- ed. Meat from carcasses having set acid ratings will be tender and require only four to six days of aging to achieve maxi- mum tenderness, he said. ;