Internet Payments

Secure & Reliable

Your data is encrypted and secure with us.
Godaddyseal image
VeraSafe Security Seal

Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

- Page 9

Join us for 7 days to view your results

Enter your details to get started

or Login

What will you discover?

  • 108,666,265 Obituaries
  • 86,129,063 Archives
  • Birth & Marriages
  • Arrests & legal notices
  • And so much more
Issue Date:
Pages Available: 18

Search All United States newspapers

Research your ancestors and family tree, historical events, famous people and so much more!

Browse U.S. Newspaper Archives

googlemap

Select the state you are looking for from the map or the list below

OCR Text

Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - July 5, 1971, Lethbridge, Alberta HOLIDAY IN EUROPE Take advantage of the Special Youth Fares now In effect Only return Only return For Travel between June 20tlh and July 25th add on For Information and reservationi contact: ART WILLIAMS TRAVEL CENTRE VIllAGE WEST END Phone 328-3Z01 or 328-8184____________ The Lethbndge SECOND SECTION Lethbridge, Alberta, Monday, July 5, 1971 PAGES 9 TO 18 ERICKSEN'S PASTRY SHOP 3rd Ave., M.M. Drive S. Phone 328.8161 "The Pioneer and Leading Retail Shop in Lethbridge" FINEST QUALITY PASTRY AND BAKERY PRODUCTS Sugar workers settle Union and management at Canadian Sugar Factories Ltd. have reached agreement on a new contract giving workers a 15 per cent wage increase over two years. Agreement was reached Thursday, one day after the previous contract expired, be- tween management and Cana- Dick Gray is likely PC candidate Dick Gray, manager of Valley Feeders Ltd. and long- time member of the Lethbridge and District Exhibition Board, is expected to contest the Pro- gressive Conservative provin- cial nomination for the Leth- bridge West riding. Mr. Gray, 51, is the immedi- ate past president of the ex- hibition board and racing direc- tor for this year's Whoop-Up Days July 19-24. A native of Calgary, he was raised in Medicine Hat and in 1940 joined the Lethbridge Maple Leafs, a senior hockey club, after playing junior hock- ey in Regina. After completing his war ser- vice, much of it in India, Mr. Gray coached the Vancouver Canucks of the Pacific Coast Hockey League for one year, then returned to Lethbridge to play for the Maple Leafs. In 1948 he organized the Leth- bridge Maple Leafs amateur team which went on to win the world hockey title for Canada in 1950. Mr. Gray settled permanent- ly in Lethbridge in 1958, open- ed a feed service in the city, sold this and in 1962 started a cattle feeding operation which has become one of the largest feedlots in Canada. He has been a member of the exhibition board since 1961 and was president from to 1970. Mr. Gray is married and has three children. Barry Snowden of the PC Lethbridge West association said a nominating meeting for the riding will be called for the early fall unless an election is announced earlier. Elected candidates for the constituency are: Charlie Bui- jert, New Democratic Party; and Dick Gruenwald, Social Credit. Three die in accidents on weekend Arnold Beever, 19, of Hill- crest and John Kinnear, 32, of Coleman were both killed Sat- urday evening when the motor- cycle they were riding col- lided with a car on the No. 3 Highway in Bellevue. The driver of the car was Glenford Canning of Calgary. An inquest into the accident has been called by Coroner Dr. F S. Radford of Blairmore but no date has been set. Agatha Lacaille of Bedcliff, Alia, was killed Saturday after- noon when a car in which she was a passenger skidded 'on a gravel road two miles north- west of Roseglen, Alta. and rolled over in the ditch. The driver of the vehicle, Joseph Murray, also of Red- cliff, was not seriously injured. An inquest into the accident has been called by Medicine Hat Coinner, Dr. E. G. F. Skin- ner but no date has been set. Roseglen Is 30 miles north- east of Medicine Hat. CLIFF BLACK, Certified Denial Mechanic BLACK DENTAL LAB Lower Level MEDICAL DENTAL BIDG. PHONE 327-2822_____ ployees Union Locals 117 (Pic- ture 118 (Raymond) and 383 (Taber dian Sugar Factories Em- The employees will receive a 25 cent per hour increase (eight per cent) effective Thursday and an additional 20 cents (seven per cent) next year. They were earning Two hurt in collision Two persons were injured and damage resulted from a three-car collision in Lethbridge early Sunday mor- ning. Cars driven by Walter Jones of 313 33 St. N. and Barry Ewing of 815 13th St. S. colli- ded at the intersection of 6th Ave. and 12th St. A N. and a further collision with a park- ed car owned by Gerald Balderson of 938 th St. S. re- sulted. Walter Jones received minor knee injuries and a passenger, Jim Grauer, received a cut forehead requiring stitches. Both were treated and re- leased from hospital Sunday. AIA medal awarded David Alexnader McCoy of Edmonton is the winner of the 1971 Alberta Institute of Agro- logists Gold Medal. Mr. McCoy, 27, received his degree in agriculture at the University of Alberta at the spring convocation. He special- ized in soil science and plans to continue his studies in graduate school. A native of Northern Ireland, he attended national College of Agricultural Engineering at Sil- soe, Bedfordshire, England be- fore coming to Canada. The Gold Medal is presented annually to the member of the graduating class in the faculty of agriculture showing the high- est achievement. DICK GRUENWALD Gruenwald appointed to board Dick Gruenwald, a city insur- ance agent and separate school trustee has been appointed to an Alberta agricultural col- lege advisory board. Henry Ruste, Alberta minis- ter of agriculture has appointed 12 Albertans to the board, which will oversee operations of the Olds, Fairview and Ver- milion agricultural colleges. Chairman of the board is C. J. McAndrews, formerly of Lethbridge and now director of the extension and colleges di- vision of the department of ag- riculture. Mr. Grunwald, recently re- red as a member of the Leth- ridge Community College xiard of governors, will be a member-at-large of the new ag- icultural board. Other members represent arm, student and administra- ive groups. bricklayers way strike Wednesday Bricklayers in Lethbridge may join bricklayers in Cal- ary and Edmonton in a prov- nce wide strike at noon Wed- esday. Spokesman for the Bricklay- rs Union in Lethbridge were unavailable for comment oday, but the union office in Edmonton said it was possible II contractors in Alberta would struck. The Calgary and Edmonton ocals set the Wednesday strike eadline during the weekend, toe of the Lethbridge brick- ayers participated in the strike rote, which covers only those ontractors negotiating through he Alberta General Contrac- ors Association. However, a strike could take out all bricklayers. Such a strike could shut down major construction projects in Alberta. The bricklayers are seek- ng a settlement giving them 6.45 per hour. n eacher-aide program Fifteen Blood and Peigan In- ians are among 20 persons re- iistered for a two-week tcacher- ide course which began at the jethbridge Community College his morning. The course offers training in a number of areas and is de- igned to provide immediate >cnefit in teaching to both no- rice and advanced teachers. Twelve of the Indians taking he course are currently em- ployed in either on-reserve or ntegrated schools while three have no previous experience. Course material to be cover- ed includes test scoring, li- >rary procedures, and schoo! supervision. GEORGE and ROD Say A LOT CAN HAPPEN IN SUMMERTIME A lot of things can happen to ruin the good times and carefree days that we look forward to during the summer months. Be prepared to avoid those that are preventable and know how to take care of those that cannot be helped. Try to avoid sun-stroke, heat exhaustion, food poisoning and take care of any known alergjes. For such annoying problems as poison ivy, sun- burn, insect bites, heat rash, chafing, etc., wo tarry a complete stock of products for treatment of simple cases. FAMILY RECORD SYSTEM is used at both of our stores. Every prescription is filed on an individual Family basis. Doctor knows your complete case history with respect to medication. Information is available at a glance. We label all medication with name of product if doctor designates I his procedure. We can locate old repeat prescriptions promptly. Blue Cross Receipts immediately avail- able in duplicate if lost. It saves time to deal in one Pharmacy. GEORGE IS AT 328-6133 DRAFFIN'S DISPENSARY HAIO CLINIC BLDG. 601 6th AVE. S. ROD IS AT DRAFFIN'S DOWNTOWN 327-3364 OUR OSCAR 6-25 "It's my old ICI graduatioi picture. The photographe thought I had a rather blan expression." rider the old contract and will arn ?3.4U after the final raise. A manage m e n t spokesman aid some improvements in ringe benefits were also in- ludect in the agreement. The contract covers 150 per- lanent workers and 500 tem- porary workers hired for the ugar-making campaign. AIC CONVENTION UNDER WAY C. J. McAndrews, director of extension and colleges division, Alberta de- partment of agriculture, represents Henry Ruste, agriculture minister, in an opening greeting as the Agricultural Institute of Canada opened its 51st annual meeting in Lethbridge Monday. More than had pre-registered for the event, STAFF CHANGES Dr. Miklos S. Kaldy, right, has re- turned to the Lethbridge Research Station after an educa- tional leave of 3Vi years. He received his doctorate in food science from Michigan State Universtiy last month and has resumed his research here with food processing. C. Wayne Lindwall, left, has started work with the station to carry on with agricultural engineering research started by D. T. Anderson. Mr. Anderson is now in India on the Dryland Research Project. Mr. Lindwall is a graduate of the Univer- sity of Alberta. He spent two seasons as a student assis- tant at the station prior to his appointment. Agrologists president takes office Charles Cheshire of Edmon- ton was installed as president of the Alberta Institute of Agro- logists for the coming year at the Institue's 25th annual meet- ing in Lethbridge Saturday. Mr. Cheshire takes over from Alex Metcalfe of Calgary. Pres- ident-elect, scheduled to take office at the 1972 meeting in Fairview, is Steve Molnar of Brooks. Ralph Trimmer, regional su- pervisor of the Alberta depart- ment of agriculture in Leth- bridge, was re-elected as local representative to the institute's seven-man council. Al Beattie of Calgary is the Alberta director on the national council of the Agriculture insti- tute of Canada. The Alberta Institute of Ag- rologists is the provincial body related to the Agricultural In- stitute of Canada. Condition is improved Gary M. Demehuk, 22, of 2421 10th Ave. A N. was renort- ed in improved condition Mon- 780 students at university suinmerscliool There are 780 students enroll- ed in the University of Leth- :ridge fifth annual summer school, which started this morning. The two-semester session of- fers courses in most university departments, but concentrates heavily on courses teachers want to lake for upgrading. The registration is about JOO more than the first summer se- mester in 1970. day in Lethbridge Municipal Hospital. Demehuk received head juries in a damage car and motorcycle collision June at the intersection of 13th St. and 2 Ave. S. The driver cf the ear was nol injured. FIREFIGHTERS BUSY On Dominion Day life Leth- >ridge firefighters made sh ambulance calls, ex- inguished two minor grass ires, put out one tractor fire and responded to a car seal 'ire. Paving scheduled. Weather permitting, crews will be putting a hot mix and asphalt overlay on the west halt ot 13th St. between 2nd Ave. A N. and 2nd Ave. S. Tuesday and Wednesday. South bound traffic will be rerouted to Stafford Drive along 3rd Ave. N., but will still have access to the Centre Vil- lage Mall. RESIDENTIAL AIR CONDITIONING and WINDOW COOLERS CHARLTON and HILL LTD. 1262 2nd AVENUE S. PHONE 328-3388 making it the largest convention ever held in Lethbridge. Among those seated on the stand for the opening in the Lethbridge Collegiate Institute were Alex Johnson, right, convention chairman, Dr. A. E. Palmer, former director of the Lethbridge Experimental Farm, honorary chair- man. Balanced approach urged in ecology and pollution JL A balanced, non hysterics! approach to the related prob- lems of ecology and pollution was called for Saturday by Alex Metcalfe, retiring presi- dent of the Alberta Institute of Agrologists. Mr. Metcalfe addressed his remarks to 70 delegates to the 25th annual meeting of the AIA held in Lethbridge during the weekend. "As citizens of Canada and as members of a professional body it lies with us to make certain that our land, water and vegetative resources are not being exploited or used in a manner inconsistent with the interests of our civilization of today and he said. "At the same time we should not be swayed by hysteria, but should be prepared to lend our knowledge and abilities to a discussion of the problems and the implementation of decisions based on that knowledge." Delegates passed a number resolutions including one calling for "the creation of a co-ordinated provincial land planning agency to designate uses of all land" while decry. ing the prevalent attitude o! "regarding land as a commo- dity rather than as a finite re- source." Welcome Delegates To the 51st Annual Agricultural Institute of Canada Convention FRACHE'S FLOWER SHOP 322 6th ST. S. PHONE 327-5747 GEORGE CIIIOSIIIIIE SCHWARTZ AGENCIES LTD. are pleased to announce the DOOR PRIZE WINNERS WICKES KOMES'OF THE 70's RECENT CONTEST 1st PRIZE 25" COLOR TV Mrs. Ed Snydor, 718 21 Street S. 2nd PRIZE TRIP FOR 2 TO CAIGARY Mr. Howio Hcggcdal, 1110 5 Avenue S. 3rd PRIZE TRANSISTOR RADIO Mrs. Sharon Whilson, 1116 26 Street N. 4lh PRIZE _ COLORPACK CAMERA Mrs. Allan Dorigatti, 1620 3 Avenue N. CONGRATULATIONS TO THE LUCKY WINNERS FROM SCHWARTZ AGENCIES LTD. EXCLUSIVE SALES AGENT FOR WICKES HOMES COUEGE MAIL PHONE 328-3331 plot, pool, xAtr-teet ackool Pcajrc, -t coxvtaivos To all visitors in our area May we suggest a walk in our Nikka Yuko Centennial Garden OFFICE FURNITURE STAN WORBOYS, Prtlldenl Lower level Seventh Street Shopping Mall P.O. Box 938, Uthbridgs Phone 328-7411 ;