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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald {Newspaper} - 1974-01-30,Lethbridge, Alberta wedweá^, JMUvy M, 1t74-THl LITHMIOOI MnULO~IT Coal labelled energy source of the future REGINA (CP) - “Coal will be the fuel oi the immediate future." Dean J. L. Wolfson of the University of Saskatchewan told municipal officials. Speaking to the annual meeting of the Sa^atchewan Urban Municipalities Association, Mr. Wolfson also expressed optimism about the lonf-term outlook for energy supply and said there should be much more research into the use of nuclear energy to produce hydr^en fuel from water. Mr. Wolfson, dean of Arts and Sciences at the university’s Regina campus, expressed suspicion that much of the past onwsltlon to development of nuclear power was “inspired” by oil companies. It is significant, he said, that such oppositiMi seems to have diminished since the oil companies lost control of Persian Gulf oil and began investing in nuclear energy. In calling for development of energy sources as alternatives to oil and natural gas, Mr. Wolfson said there are seven main possible alternative types of power — coal, nuclear, hydroelectric, geothermal, solar, wind, and tidal. The last four are theoretically attractive but impractical becausie of the vast difficulties in exploiting tibem in sufficient quantity, he said. Supplies of hydroelectric power are limited and construction of dams poses environmental problems, he said. Coal, however, had several attractions as a fuel. The supply was vast — Canada had enough for 4,000 years at present consumption rates — and it could be used in the form of a liquid or gas after treatment. The man behind Britain*$ mine dispute MICK THE RED’ HATES CAPITALISM MICK McGAHEY LONDON (CP) - “Communists don’t infiltrate unions,” says the dour, uncMnpromis-ing Mick McGahey, “we’re bom into them ” A deeply'Committed Communist who is vicepresident of Britain’s 270,000-member National Union of Mineworkers, McGahey is determined to use the miners’ pay dispute as a political weapon to smash the Conservative governinent “The present dispute is not simply a question of wages,” he says bluntly “This is a question of a declining capitalist society, corrupt and trying to deny the workers their democratic rights." His strategy for industrial revolution and installation of a socialist regime is to urge the coal miners into a full strike that would paralyse industry and bring the government to its knees. It may also doom millions of Britons to the hardship of the breadlines CARRIES SCARS An austere Scot, unloved by many of his own unitHi colleagues, McGahey has no time for small talk. Dubbed by newspapers as “Mick the Red.’^ the «-year-old mihtant sUil carries the scars caused by a bi^en bottle smashed Into his face when he was sell' Ing Communist newspaper« in a Glasgow bar as a teen-ager. His friends call him the iron man, at tough as the coal he hewed out of a mine a halfmile underground. Some union chiefs call him "The Minister.” for McGahey seems always attired in black. In many ways McGahey, married and father of three children, has become Britain’s bogyman Militancy and a lifelong struggle to improve worker conditions are McGahey’s only passions, his friends say. McGahey was fed on communism on his father’s lap He was raised in the birak coal town of Shotts. in the heart of the Lanarkshire coalfields. His father, James, was a founding member of the Communist party in Scotland and a miners’ leader in the 1926 general strike McGahey’s father was virtually driven out of town because of his strike battle The bitterness in the youth «ben the father died, a victim of poeumoco-niosis, the lung disease that killed hundreds of miners. “I watched my father die and I have remembered it all my life,” McGahey says. He joined the Young Communist League when he was H after poring over Marx and Engels in the public library. He went down the \ that same yc generation of McGaheys to dig coal Two years later he was addressing miners’ rallies in Glasgow own the pits -the fifth James Bay residents continue their fight MONTREAL (CP) -James Bay residents will continue to fight a hydroelectric project in nordiem Quebec even if the federal government cuts off aid which has helped finance court actions, a native leader said 'Hiesday Charlie Watt, president of the Northern Quebec Inuit Association, said in an interview the fight "would be very difficult without federal funds, but if it has to be done without them, it will be done " j£an Chretien, federal Indian affairs minister, said ' Monday in Ottawa the James Bay Indians and Eskimos risk losioK federal aid by refusing to accept a flOO million provin cial compromise offer as a basis for negotiation. That offer, unveiled last week by Premier Robert Bourassa, would rive the 10.000 Indians and Eskimos of , the region *100 million in cash and royalties over 10 years and ownership rights to 2,000 square miles of land as compensation for the f6 billion project Mr. Watt disagreed Tuesday with Mr. Chretien’s contention that the compromise is as good as settlements reached elsewhere with native peoples. EARLY SKUS Skimg dates back to 2,500 Senior citizens misled over new glasses cost Small parking meter Putting your nickel or dime In meters begins to be a pain as this Saskatoon man discovers when he had to ciimb a hill of snow to plug his meter. Due to the large amount of snow that Saskatoon has received (42.8 inches so far — the average for the whole year is 40 inches), this comes as a common sight in Saskatoon. EDMONTON (CP) - The iriTfldent of the Alberta .Itometric Association says senior citizens are being misled into believing new glasses will cost them next to nothing under the provincial government’s extended care program. Dr. R. C, Lindberg of Edmonton said senior citizens could pay 40 per cent of the actual cost because the government plan doesn’t cover most services provided by Alberta optometrists. Dr. Lindberg said government publicity leads senior citizens to believe they wlU have to pay only the 10 per cent of the optometrlc fee schedule not covered by the government. The government plan also does not pay the fuU cost of eye examinations or frames and does not cover most other services, said Dr. Lindberg. Government literature says eye examinations are covered by the Alberta Health Care Insurance Commission. The commission will pay $12.S0 of the |22 cost. INCORRECT VERSION Dr. Lindberg said government literature which tells senior citizens they must pay optometrists directly for prescribing and dispensing glasses, and then seek reimbursement from the government, gives the public an incorrect version of the plan. He said there would be little point ID billing the government when the patient will have to be biUed for many services not covered by the plan. The extended care plan covers designing, processing, dispensing glasses but does not include several other services. The plan also does not include contact lenses although they are the only way to treat some prat-operative cataract patients. Dr. Lindberg said. Dr. Scott Bribin, the association’s secretary, said the government’s $5 allowance for franoes falls short of the cost of frames available to optometrists. Dr. Brisbin said the association is producing a brochure explaining the new government plan to senior citizens. He said he now spends about an hour a day explaining the system to his older patients. 250 tnillion MCKCOW (AP) - The pop-ulaUon of the Soviet Union reached 2S0.9 million on Jan. 1, the Soviet news agency Tass reports. The best to you from Palm. Old Fashioned^^m^ Ice Cream. iSMP palm dairies LiMtTGD MARTENS a The friendly staff at Martens want to spend their Birthday with YOU in appreciation of the 7 wonderful years that you, our customers, have favoured us with. FOODLINER& COALDALE MlíNrJkll I Çfîl HARDWARE Pilone 3454322 WIN A or one of miny niliir prizes FREE i* your lucky number and MARTENS ,i* your store! 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