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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald {Newspaper} - 1974-01-23,Lethbridge, Alberta Landing righn agreement CP Air, KLM airlines sign pact OTTAWA (CP) - Caiudian air negotiator* have initialled an agreement with the Netherlands granting CP Air certain economic l)enefits in exchange for Toronto landing rights to KLM Royal Dutch AirUnes, O. G. Stoner, deputy transport minister, reports-Mr, Stoner conlirmed reports that KLM has obuin- ed landing rights in Toronto in addition to existing rights to Montreal. But, he said he could not give details as the agreement must still be ratified by cabinet. However, it is understood that CP Air will get permisSion to pick up passengers in Amsterdam for onward flights to other countries. At the mo- ment the Canadian airline may only carry passengers between Canada and Amsterdam. In additi<m, KLM wUl have to include M(mtreal in flights to Toronto, say authoritative sources.    ' . These sources say there will be some form of pooling arrangement ensuring that one New series of computers to make debut this year OTTAWA — Control DaU Canada Ltd., subsidiary of one of the world’s largest computer companies, plans to introduce later this year a ____new series of large, high- TWO members ol .he menegement s«« o. a    ol .he pi, shet. as .hey work a weeK^ shitty Thoresby England, coat mine, electrical engineer    Members of management have been    Canada. Harry Randall, left, and under manager Phillip Wood,    ban on miners’ overtime to carry out essential    called the Cyb^ 170 series, discuss the condition of the mine near the bottom    safety work on weekends.    the computers will eventually Executive effort APPLIANCES’ DOWNTOWN CLOSE-OUT FINAL 5 DAYS Thursday - Friday - Saturday - Monday - Tuesday used Color TV’s ♦ New Color TV’s B&W TV’s ♦ Stereos TV Stands Radios -♦ Record Players ♦ Fridges ♦ Stoves kWashers Dryers ♦ Dishwashers 606 • 3rd Avenue S. Lethbridge Phone 327-5767 We will be closed Wednesday Jan. 30tii for stocic taking Here are just a few examples of the Savingsl RCA 17” Black and White Portable TV $4 Closeout ^ Used RCA 22" Color Console TV Fully rscondilioned ........1 99®® RCA Mod type . Stereo Set with AM/FM Radio cice-out 4 49®® Sale ............. ■ ■ RCA Self Cleaning Electric Range sr”“' 369®* RCA Front loading Dishwasher cio,e.™,.....269-^^ RCA used Gas Dryer $4 Close-out ” 1 all merchandise covered by full parts and labor warranty You always do better at.,. -IjtSLjiS “APPLIANCES' DOWNTOWN replace Control Data’s existing top-of-the-line Cyber 70 series, which now includes the . largest computer in the world, the model 7600 used by the weather office in Montreal for long-range forecasts. Tlie lower-speed models in the new series, the Cyber 172 and 173, will be manufactured for world-wide distribution at CDC’s three-year-old Mississauga plant near Toronto starting later this year. This will represent two “firsts” for Canada’s growing computer industry; the first time large, general purpose computers have been designed in Canada; and the first time any large computer has been manufactured exclusively in Canada, for world-wide distribution. The Cuber 170 computers will be about half the physical size of the Cyber 70 models they vrill replace during the next few years; as much as twice as fast in processing data; and slightly less expensive, according to industry sources. Just as important, the computers feature new circuit tecimology added to the Cyber 70 design that optimiies the operation of the computers in far-flung computer networks. The Cyber 170 computers will be designed specifically to be able to “talic” with other computers hundreds or even thousands of miles away, using the special broad-band computer communications facilities which are springing up across the continent. And the Control Data computers will be able to interact and exchange information with computers and terminal equipment made. by other computer companies. To date, existing computers usually have been modified after-the-fact to operate in networks and communicate with other malces of computers. Industry sources suggest that this network communication capability promises to be the most important requirement during the next decade, particularly for countries like Canada faced with such long distances between major cities. It might be noted that Control Data is regarded as the computer company with the most expertise in computer networks. It operates the world’s largest computer network, is own Cybernet computer data services company. And reportedly Russia wants Control Data to help assemble a huge Soviet computer network. The official announcement of the new CanadiaiHlesigned Cjber 170 computer series is planned for April inrToronto. The first models, the Cyber 172 to be made in Canada, will be offered commercially for sale during the last quarter of 1974, with other models being phased into production in Canada and in the U.S. in the months after.    * The Cyber 170 computers wiU slowly replace the Cyber 70 series. The higher-speed models, the Cyber 174 and 175, will be manufactured in Control Data’s main plant near St. Paul, Minn. The Cyber 173 will rlikely be made there as well. airline doe* not get att the business on the route. START MAY 1 In Toronto, a KLM tinman said that flights likely will begin May 1 on the Toronto route. Flights probably would operate wly with a Toronto-Montreal-Amsterdam service on weekdays and non-stop service to Amsterdam from Toronto on Sundays. He said the Dutch airline intends to seek the lucraüve air cargo market as well as providing passenger service based on rate schedules of the International Air Transport Association. The agreement follows only two rounds of negotiations— short for international air talks. Dutch and Canadian negotiators met in Ottawa shortly before Christmas and returned to the Netherlands for the final round about a weeic ago. The two nations have been operating without a formal air agreement since 1967. The Dutch broke off the bilateral agreement at that time because they were unable to get Toronto landing rights. KLM is the fourth overseas airline to get permission to land in Toronto. ^ The British airline, BOAC, has long had Toronto landing rights but Alitalia, the Italian airline, and Lufthansa, the German air carrier, won permission only in the last two years. As with most European airlines they also land in Montreal. Selected stocks recommended by investment dealer TORONTO (CP) - Although merchandlcing stocks have suffered recent substantial losses and poor performance, one investment dealer recommends selected stocks at current levels. Yorkton Securities Ltd. says along with the influence of the investor’s declining faith in the market in general and anticipated slowdown in rate of growth of retail sales, retailing stocks in particular have suffered losses during the last few months. Yorkton agrees that the excellent rate of growth enjoyed by the retailers last year will not be approached in 1974, but believes investors should make commitments in selected merchandising stocks, many of which are at or near historically low levels relative to earnings. The industry has a high variable cost factor. It employs a significant number of part-time employees whose ranks might be reduced should demand slacken and costs require trimming, Yorkton says. Other positive factors are the lack' of government involvement in the industry, minimal effects of the increased price of energy and no widely publicized complaints of increased prices on goods sold in department stores, as has occurred with rising food prices. Yorkton says it prefers retailers who have relative strength in Western Canada, where oil and gas activity, higher employment rates and rising farming incomes should all combine to create department store sales growth greater than that elsewhere. Two companies recommended are the Hudson's Bay Co. and Simpsons-Sears Ltd. Earnings of Hudson’s Bay, a major retailer in Western Canada, should be significantly better than those of its primarily Eastern-based competitors, Yorkton says, "In addition to its favorable position as a retailer, we consider that Hudson’s Bay represents an undervalued situation from an asset point of view. The company owns about 1.9 million shares of Hudson’s Bay Oil and Gas Co. Ltd, and 3.2 million shares of Siebens Oil and Gas Ltd." Approximately 35 to 40 per cent of Simpsons-Sears Ltd.’s sales are derived from its stores in Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. This fact should protect the company from any significant decline in the rate of sales growth anticipated for Eastern Canada. Yorkton believes the company’s management and its technique of ordering goods to a pre-determined set of standards are central factors in a successful operation. Oil firm» gear for north work FAIRBANKS, Alaska (AP) — Modular units capable of housing more than 1,300 workers will roll up the Alaska Highway later this month as oil companies gear up for construction of the 'Trans-Alaska pipeline. A spokesman for the Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. said the housing valu^ at ^5.95 million was destined for four construction camps north of the Yukon River. Some 28 campsites, seven of them already established, are planned along the 800-mile pipeline route. Norman Robertson, president of Atco Structures Ltd. of Calgary, said in a telephone interview the trailer-type housing would be transported In about two weeks from Canada, Robertson said the shipment was an initial order, estimating a total cost for temporary housing during pipeline construction could run as high as $80 million. Plan merger TORONTO (CP) - Perini Pacific Ltd. of Toronto and Wiley Oilfield Hauling Ltd. of Red Deer, Alta., have announced a proposed merger of Perini’s Majestic Construction Division with Wiley. The companies said today the operating assets of Majestic will be transferred to a new Alberta corporation, which will be merged with Wiley.    • The shareholders of Wiley will receive one share of the amalgamated company for each share of Wiley held now. Present shareholders of Wiley will own about 25 per cent of the amalgamated company and Perini Pacific will hold the balance. Majestic Construction has operated since 1954 in Canada and the U.S. and is one of the largest pipeline contractors in North America. Wiley is engaged in pipeline stringing, road construction, transportation of equipment to the Arctic and support services. Perini Pacific is a subsidiary of Perini Ltd, of Toronto, wholly-owned by Perini Corp. of Framington, Mass., a company spokesman said. Demand for resin to exceed supply TORONTO (CP) - The Society of the Plastics Industry of Canada says demand for resin in 1974 will exceed the supply by as much as 65 per cent. The society said the estimate. following a survey of its members, is based on the assumptions that domestic resin producers will receive all necessary feedstock and that importers will continue to obtain supplies from the United States. ‘ If anything, this report errs on the optimistic side." the society said in its report. In shortest supply, the society said, will be polypropylene, used in film, refrigerators, housewares and safety helmets. Supplies are expected to reach about 85 million pounds while demand will be for about 140 million pounds, the society said. Shortages of polyethylene, the most widely - used resin, are not, however, expected to be as severe. Demand (or the material, used in insulation, housewares and packaging, is expected to exceed supplies by about 17 per cent, the society said. Manufacturers of glass fibre, however, will be affected by a shortage of polyester resin, said the society. Demand for that resin is expected to exceed supplies by about 37.5 per cent or 15 million pounds. Vtr>SL-A.ri!i; :í!nCíiíV£sco¡r ;