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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Daily Herald (Newspaper) - January 16, 1918, Lethbridge, Alberta PAGE FOUR THE LETHBRIDGE DAILY HERALD WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 10. 1918 DAILY AND WEEKLY Proprietor* and Publishers JTHE LETHBRIDGE HERALD PRINTING COMPANY, LIMITED 123 6th Strtet South, Lethbridge W. A. Buchanan President and Managing Director John Torrance - - Business Manager TELEPHONES Business Office .............. 1253 Editorial Office.............. 1224 Subscription Rates: Daily, delivered, per week ..... .10 Daily, delivered, per year .....$5.00 Daily, by mail, per year ......$4.00 Weekly, by mail, per year .....51.50 Weekly, by mail, per year to U.S..$2.00 Dates of expiry of subscriptions appear daily on address label. Acceptance of papers i.fte. expiratkn nate Is our authority to centinuo the subscription. THE PROGRESS OF THE WAR An unique agreement is said to have been reached by the opposing political parties in Germany in their strife over peace conditions. It is stated that the Russian program of no annexations nor indemnities is to be accepted so far as the eastern front is concerned, but that the little German military god. Hlndenburg, is to have full say as to annexations on the western front. Such an agreement of course, could only mean one thing, so far as the allies are concerned, and that is the greater necessity for an overwhelming defeat of the Germans on the western front. It is doubtful, however, whether the Russian Bol-sheviki would accept such an agreement. The Italians have inflicted heavy losses on the enemy in the several encounters on the Italian front recently. Ou the western front the Germans made strong assaults on the French positions on the Meuse, but were repulsed. PREMIER FOLLOWED THE WISE COURSE ' The action of Premier Stewart in appointing a commission to enquire into the working of the Factory Act will meet with general approval, and the Herald believes he has made no mistake in naming the men whose names were announced Tuesday. Judge Carpenter as a member of the public utilities board, is closely in' touch with the general affairs of the province, and can bring to the commission his judicial experience. Deputy Attorney-General Browning is the .man in charge of the administration of the act. and should be in a position to guide the enquiry Into the channels where most difficulty has been encountered in the working of the measure to date. The commission should hear all sides of the question, from the standpoint of employers 'and retail merchants, employees, and the general public, especially the farmers. The Herald has no doubt that the commission, after hearing all phases of the question, will be able to bring in recommendations that will meet with general approval. B0URAS3ASEES DARKLY BAKER SEES BRIGHTLY Henri Bourassa, pro-German that he appears to be, maintains that this war has nothing whatever to do with the advancement of democracy. No matter the object of the war Bourassa is against it, democracy or no democracy, freedom or no freedom. Bourassa isn't In favor of a progressive democracy; he iB not now or never was an advocate of the interests of' the common people. Race and language, with him, are greater than anything else. We don't need to be concerned about Bour-asaa's interpretation of war alms. That the war is being aimed for the protection and advancement of democracy, the real friends of democracy know. One of the real friends of modern democracy is N'ewton D. Baker, secretary of war in the United States. Developed in the Tom Johnson school of progressives in Cleveland, he clings closely to the Tom Johnson ideals. Baker interprets the war as a struggle for the maintenance oi democracy -as a war that will bring about, a better day for the world. We do not hesitate to publish a portion of a speech he recently delivered before the Southern Society in .New York, because it sets forth the real issue. Here is what he said: "And so all wars which have been waged for the prestige of Kings or the territorial extension of empires fail Jn their analogy. There is a quality in this war which evokes a spiritual response and that will he a new Itlud of cement for the making of a stronger and more triumphant people when it is over. "We are not fighting this battle alone. I am not even ambitious that the glory of the final conquest should come to us alone. I would far rather have the triumph of democracy the reward of the associated effort of democratic peoples everywhere, so that when this war is over neither we Bur they can have any monopoly of that virtue, but will bo partners In its glory, and so associates in the future progress which is to bo made. "For wa must never forget, when we speak of democracy, that tt is hot an accomplishment, it is not a thing that has been done, but It is a progress; it is a system of growth, and though today we might achieve what our limited vision proclaims to us as the democratic ideal, its quality Is such that when we stand on what now seems to us the highest peak of that range, there will be greater heights to tempt and inspire us. And so. when this war is over, and the crude medievalism which at last brings the Hoheiuollerns and the ! Hapsburgs to confront their fate in the young giant of the democratic spirit; when this contest is over and the David of democracy has dealt with the Goliath of medievalism and aulo-cracv. thor.e will s'.lll be work for David "to do worthy of his best efforts, and in the accomplishment of it large benefits to the race still remain to be achieved. "tt Is a wonderful story, the alignment of the nations which can truly be called civilized, against the ancient medievalism which survives in the heart of Europe. The hope of mankind, so often frustrated, apparently is now to be accomplished. It could not be done in Xapoleon's time. In spite of the French Revolution, and its philosophy and its promise, because of what Danton called 'The Allied Kings of Europe.' It could not be done in 1S40 because of the Met-ternichs and the Bismareks. It could not be done in 1S70 because they were still triumphant, but out of the west, out of this youngest and latest and most hopefui of the nations of the earth; out of this young giant, fashioned out of all the peoples, who originate in a new philosiphy, little rivulets of it have gone over to other peoples in other parts of the world. "And now. in the fullness of time, this giant is full grown, and she joins hands with other peoples, who. though older, are yet the children of her spirit, and we are partners now with great nations who have borne for three years heroically the brunt of this struggle, and at the end of it, out of the noise of battle and smoke of the battlefield, there arises the picture of a new fraternity of mankind - the sons and daughters of civilization joining hands to protect the sacred principles upon which the freedom of mankind rests..... "The American people have shot through all their preparations for this war an influence of idealism and morality which is a new thing in the world. About our training camps new conditions have arisen. All sorts of modern, advanced notions with regard to the amusement and entertainment and recreation of young men, in order that they may be virile, strong, and high-minded, have been adopted, not because of any particular wisdom in any place, but because of the unanimous judgment and demand of the American people, and so. when our armv goes abroad, it will be a knightly army, not an army of conquest that expects to come home with a chariot and somebody chained to the wheels and loaded up with material spoils, but an army that is going to live and die for the fine fruits of a high idealism and a purified national morality." In a war for the purposes, Mr. Baker so well outlines, Canada has no need to apologise for participating. We should be proud to do our utmost, to make every sacrifice, that these ideals, should be won. Bourassa is a fanatic but Baker is a true democrat. Daly Cre'.-k........ 8 Porctip ne Hills ...... 16 Hound Up ........... 14 Carnl'or'h ......... 14 Northern Light..... 4 Trout Creek ... ..... 4 Green Bank......... 5 Willoiv Creek...... 2 Kohler Coulee...... 5 44 Ranch .......... 1 Schiifw........... 6 Mondow Creek ..-. ... 19 Foothills Lumber Mills 2 Happy Valley........ 2 Mend Creek........ 10 Jlaycroft.......... 12 Marshall 10 3 21 10 12 14 ^8' o 22 6 31 11 49 52 37 12 2:5 is 10 9 21 2o 4 tt S 6 6 5 15 29 24 21 14 21 22 16 10 4 3 5 6 10 6 17 lo 14 7 fi 12 28 10 11 4 18' 22 6 12 15 5 62 4 5 18 14 55 66 9 6 15 9 9 11 8 fill fi 3 2 11 1 1 0 s 3 7 3 1 3 3 0 2 0 4 4 2 1 1 0 4 5 5 2 0 1 0 0 5 2 1 6 3 2 3 1 4 2 0 2 6 0 2 4 3 9 12 33 10 North Fork.........19 10 4 Nobleford ...... 16 11 3 Rocky Coulee.......25 12 7 Prairie Dell ........ 4 3 ,14 Balfour............ 3 3 12 Stavely............ 50 14 , 33 Broomfield ........ 6 2 23 Pine Coulee ........ 3 0 13 Table Butte..... 6 4 13 Beaver Valley ...... 4 0 0 McEwan........... 8 10 1 Basin ............. 4 4 1 Lane's Ranch ...... 3 3 0 Shaw and Monkmans 5 7 0 Sunset..............17 9 5 Alberta ........... 12 18 13 Parkland .......... 55 6 28 Stranghan's ...... 11 4 27 Broadway ......... 10 6 10 Sun Prairie ......... 10 13 11 Nanton Town....... 108 59 11 Nanton Rural ...... 45 23 7 Coleraine .........- 14 6 11 Muirhead .......... 27 1 0 Pekisko........... 22 0 2 Tongue Creek...... 14 S . 4 Tongue Creek Hall ... 27 8 4 Big Hill ........... 39 12 11 Jackson........... 22 32 G High River West, A to L ............. 65 29 12 High River West, M to Z ............ 61 27 6 High River East, A to L ............ 72 41 10 High River East, M to Z ............ 6G 34 10 Blackie............ 37 58 14 Frankburg........ 14 16 Brant.............. 24 10 9 Peace............. 9 16 2 Arthur............. 12 8 I Braoside .......... 20 6 3 Cayley ............- 24 30 5 Last Chance.......... 7 U 4 Mosquito Creek ...... 12 .13 0 Lineham.......... 17 6 0 Lock Sloy........ 20 3 2 North Fork ......... 12 0 2 (ilonvk-w .......... 8 1 3 Dinton ........... 29 9 8 Tine Canyon ........ 14 3 4 Gladys ............ 43 9 16 Davlsbnrg.......... 20 13 0 Aldersyrlo ......... 21 21 8 East Okotoks ....... 100 28 9 West Okotoks...... 59 6 10 Melrose ........... 20 2 2 Turner ... ......... 48 8 7 MUlnapore......... 54 9 1 DeWlnton.......... 36 30 2 Pan'ma............ 29 2 13 Big Rock ........... 15 G 7 Black Diamond..... 22 19 1 Millarville......... 36 9 1 Priddia........... 34 16 7 Kew.............. 20 17 2 Bragg Creek........ 4 5 1 West Coleman...... 30 43 H Centre Coleman...... 81 61 7 East Coleman...... 78 72 36 Blairmore, A to ;�.[ .. 08 82 8 Blairmore, N to '/. ____ 52 38 4 Hillcrest........... 32 17 .03 Frank............ 48 50 7 Bellevue .......... 65 97 51 Litndbreck......... 24 16 6 Gillingham........ 16 ' 18 , 2 Livingstone ........ 20 8 I Carbon Hill........ '.(, 0 o Beaver .Minns ...... 31 20 4 Burmis ........... 5, 11 �{ Manchester ......... 2* 8 2 Totals .......... 3890 �545 948 Majority for S!iw over Mclvor, J345. Major'ty for Hh/""* �ver Mclvor and Marshall. 307 wait launched at tho Western Canada Shipyards Vancouver. Tho War Noot-ka, named after the first white settlement In British Columbia Is said to be the first vessel of any size ever launched in False Creek. Her keel was laid July 20 lost. She is 250 feet long with a dead weight capacity of 2,800 tons. At tho unnual meeting of tho East York Conservative Association, Hon. t. H. Lucas, in reply to a question by one of the members as to tho possibility of eteonnsktxn Ity of an extension, of tho life of (he present legislature boinff arranged, said: "No such suggestion has over received consideration by tho government. So far as tho govprnniont is concerned, the matter has never been brought to their attention In any way." Applications for divorce have been filed at Ottawa by William L. Wal-polo, Toronto; Henry Ernest Snxby, Toronto; Mary Clair Dawson Hislop, Westmouiit; Thomas Bailey � Waln-wright, Montreal; David M. SI()3S, Carnarvon Township, Out.; Walter Starklv, Star City. Sask.; Martin Kafncf, Tofield, Alta.; Mary C. Ewart, Winnipeg, and Albert Edwin Gordou, Toronto. There nre rumors from apparently well informed sources, that among the bills to be brought down in the Manitoba legislature at tho session which opens Thursday, will be. one dealing with a surtax on all the vacant laud in tho province. It is said that the proposed tax will be levied only on land which is held by speculators and which is not devoted to production. It will only apply, it is said, to potential farm land and will not effect vacant lots in towns and cities. Rev. Thomas Green, M.A., B.D., of Dur.das Street Methodist Church, Woodstock, Out., has received a unanimous invitation for the coming conference year from Grace Methodist church, Dunnville, Out. Dunlins street Methodist Church has reciprocated by unanimously inviting Rev. S. A. Laid-man, M.A., Ph.D.,, of Dunnville. Both churches have increased the salary to $1,400 for tho incoming new pastor. ' Fire at Listowel, Ont., did $200,000 damage. Many of the leading stores located on tho south side of Main street have been leveled, among then: the (hree-storey Schinbein block, ir which was the Schinbein departmental store, Benders' Grocery, tho Old Follows' quarters and numerous offices. Other business places completely I wiped out'are: Koch and Pencer'g ishoo store; McDonald's barber shop; j Miss Gibb'a millinery store; McAllister's pool room, and Von Spuen's tailor store, In addition to Johnston's jewelry store. Major J. S. MacDonald, assistant director of chaplain service in London, who received n decoration of the Order of the British empire,, la a Now Brunswick minister, formerly editor of tho Maritime Baptist. Buchanan's Majority 1770 Official Count in the Lethbridge Riding | City Poll- Hardievillo.....*     Labor Hull.......... Miner's Hal*........�  : Westminster ... if..... Fleetwood......... I Central.............. 1 Courtlan d............ j No. "1 Fire Hall ... . �  Country Polls ' CoUtt-8...........>   Cardston............... , Magritth......... ..... j Warner............. I Patience............ New Dayton......... Bow Island............ ' UurdcU........... Del Bonlta........... Richfield............. " S. Tnber............. X. Tuber ............. Barnwell............. Elcan................ Chin................ C. Y. District......... Iron Springs........... Albion Itidgo........... t Conldulo............. McLean............... Hyssop............... ; White.........'...... Stirling.............. Raymond ............. Leohigh..........;.  � Newlands............. Coalhurst............ Kippen ............... ! Alters............... Lucky Strike.......... Sexton Croek .......... Aetna................ ' Taylorville............ Kennedy's............ :iacke.............. siclntyro............. lyrell's Lako.......... Buchanan , ... 35 . ... 397 , ... 63 .. .. -172 ..... 172 ____ 562 .....152 .... 77 13| 157 129 30 10 27 122 75 21 S 99 203 3 .IS 12 53 20 39 41 19 35 22 77 5 12 125 22 12 6 12 28 . 9 �I Pack 13 112 57 187 36 114 57 4S 3 177 109 49 20 8 30 49 !) 5 42 150 26 27 4 r 1(1 26 15 15 10 9 75 134 � 5 31 13 23 33 2(1 20 8 2 12 7 2 Grassy Lake .......... 11.5 29 6 42 9 10 7 21. 21. Foremost............ 65 63 Mountain View........ 35 28 Purple Springs........., 39 31 Boundary Creek We3t..... 8 5 Spring Coulee.......... 20 9 Boazer............... 7 14 Woolford............. 21 17 Haley.............. Kimball............. 17 25 3 4 St. Kildn............ 33 3 West Lethbrldgo....... 31 8 Diamond City ......... 13 6 Two-Kiftecn........... 10 20 Chin Coulee........... 5 16 Netghborvlew.......... 28 1(1 8 0 Fletcher............. 11 7 Turin............... 5 15 Hiijli field ............. 1 9 Lind School........... 5 5 Weslfield............ 4 8 Golden Prairie......... 9 4 Bankview......,....... 19 S 10 1 Welling............. 5 21 Samson............... 11 17 5 O') uu Three Eleven...... ... 10. 24 Ingram's............. 2 1 Knappen............... 19 14 Owendale...... ..... 7 0 Boundary Creek No. 2 .. , 9 Sherburne............ 13 6 Northeast...........;. 13 11 Four Eleven ... ... ..... 9 14 4173 2403 Majority for Buchanan .1770 Rejected.......... . 28 Spoiled........... . 42  Polled in envelopes .. . ... . 86 f.< - �.�