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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 22, 1974, Lethbridge, Alberta i nt LtiHbHlDUE HERALD Friday, February Lawrence Lamb M.D. Dear Dr. Lamb Our family has been drinking two per cent low fat milk for sometime now. I have just been told that calcium from milk cannot be absorbed without the cream. Also, fat is equally necessary for absorption of vitamins A, D, E andK- u Does this mean we should use regular milk instead of low fat milk in order to get the most benefits from it? Dear Reader You didn't get that misinformation from a physician or a reputable qualified nutritionist. It is a good example of a lot of incorrect propaganda put out by a handful of unqualified, self-appointed health experts, without medical credentials and without a good standing within circles of sound nutrition: You do not need the fat in the milk to absorb the calcium. That is pure hokum. Furthermore, there is more calcium in the two per cent fat milk product because it is fortified with nonfat milk solids that contain calcium. It also contains more protein per glass. There is even more calcium and protein per glass in the fortified skim milk products. You have listed the fat soluble vitamins. Actually, vitamin A is not very dependent upon fat for absorption. You must go to a lot of trouble to eliminate fat from your diet. That two per cent fat milk you drink has about a third of its calories from fat. Vegetables, including corn (corn beans, and most others, plus many fruits, including such things as raspberries all have some fat in them. It is a small portion by weight but often a significant part of the calories. The problem then is limiting the fat in most people's diet, not increasing it for the purposes you mentioned. Quite frankly, some of the poor advice given by some non-medical, so-called experts is a public health hazard. Many of these, individuals have had little or no scientific training. One prominent public figure responsible for much of this misinformation got her master's degree in the 1930s and apparently hasn't profited a great deal from the new information that has become available over the past quar- ter of a century. She still gives out advice that fits with walking across the country to a rural school house for one to two miles after a morning of doing farm chores. Send your questions to Dr. Lamb, in care of this newspaper, P.O. Box 1551, Radio City Siaiion, New York, N.Y. 10019. For a copy of Dr. Lamb's booklet on balanced diet, send 50 cents to the same address and ask for "Balanced Diet" booklet. Your horoscope By torn Diion Pun with figures By J. A. H. HUNTER "Your license said Greg. "1089 seems a very ordinary number except it's a perfect square." Jim smiled, shaking his head. "Not only he replied. "H you multiply it by another whole number you get the same license number backwards. Multiply by 9 and you get 9801." "Say, that's his friend exclaimed. "D'you think any other 4-digit number works that way, maybe not for 9 Well? Thanks for an idea to J. Butterfield, Toronto, Ontario. (Answer Monday) Yesterday's answer: HOMER was 10789 SATURDAY, FEB. 23 Your birthday today: Introduces a mixed year of variable conditions requiring skill in both old and new ways of doing things. Some experiments of this year turn out to be foundations for possible whole systems supporting your success. In the process, you make a personal transition toward broader philosophy. Relationships are uphill, cannot be ignored or treated lackadaisically. Today's natives have rather good powers of concentration, can present themselves well. ARIES (March 21-April Pick up the odds and ends of duty left over from the work week. Continuing concerns over the welfare of long-time friends, older people is indicated. TAURUS (April 20-May Expenses rise to some extent despite all budgeting. The news from your distant connections is really encouraging, although still incomplete. GEMINI (May 21-June Make this as easy a day as you can, assigning yourself no special project or heavy activity. Simply breaking up the monotony is time well invested. CANCER (June 21-July If you do not want to say "no" to a borrower, be out of reach. Home and family affairs gain mightily from your enthusiasm and attentions today. LEO (July 23-Aug. Accept the blessing of a peaceful day rather than go stirring crosscurrents. Review your domestic scene, prepared for minor changes from previous arrangements. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept Spend the day thinking through your situation and what you want to do about it. Let people go their ways while you seek privacy for your theorizing. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. Serious co-operation with close associates brings high rewards. Stay out of reach of petty criticisms from those on the fringes of your social circle. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Npv. This odd day is divided between concern over material prosperity and pursuit of romantic or sentimental adventures. Retire early for extra rest. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22- Dec. Those 'who care about you tend to offer comments and suggestions. You have many extra chores to do merely to maintain the course you've set for yourself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. Relax, stretch out to enjoy life this rather calm Saturday. Sentiment, responses from the heart are strong, not to be taken lightly. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. The affairs of younger people, your own health care program, personal projects crowd your day. Patience with amorous inclinations nothing goes smoothly now. PISCES (Feb. 19-March Wherever your responsibilities permit, get out and join the social whirl now, with visits and discussions of plans. You have errands to run. 1974, The Chicago Tribune Ask Andy Goren on Bridge BY CHARLES HI GOREN Chicago Tribtim Both vulnerable. North deals. NORTH KJ92 V 1073 0 AQ64 AQ WEST EAST V A84 09752 OK 10 8 SOUTH A Q 10 8 6 3 V K5 0 J3 842 The bidding: North East South West I NT Pass 4 Pass Pass Pass Opening lead: Seven of 4k. "There is a demand nowa- days for the man who can make wrong appear wrote Publius Terentius Afer [190-159 He might have had today's declarer in mind. After North had opened the bidding with one no trump. South could have checked on North's major suit holdings by bidding two clubs. However, he decided that it might be important to shield his king of hearts from the opening lead, so he elected to leap straight to the spade game. In this he was right, for East'had a natural lead of the queen of hearts had North become de- clarer at four spades, and that would have scuttled the contract there and then. A club lead would have given declarer no play for the contract as the cards lie, but West couldn't know that He opted for the relatively safe lead of a trump. The contract seemed safe enough if either mnor suit king or the ace of hearts was oroide, declarer would have no trouble in gathering in 10 tricks. Unfortunately for the defenders, South was one of those players who believed that they were chronically unlucky, and that if anything could go wrong it almost certainly would. Therefore, declarer was reluctant to bank anything on a line of play that needed a successful finesse. Instead, he sought an alternative line, and found one that would guarantee success no matter how the opposing cards were divided. Declarer won the opening trump lead in his hand and crossed to dummy with a trump to the nine, in the process drawing the out- standing trump. Now, he led a low diamond towards his jack. East could not afford to duck, for that would have cost the defenders their dia- mond trick. Accordingly, he rose with the king and shift- ed to the queen of hearts. De- clarer covered with the king. West won the ace and did the best he could by switch- ing his attack to clubs. De- clarer took dummy's ace and played a diamond to the jack. Dummy was reentered with a trump, and two clubs were discarded on the high diamonds. The defenders still got a heart trick, but that was alL Note that if West held the king of diamonds, the con- tract was still safe. West could capture the jack of di- amonds, and his best return would be a club. Declarer rises with the ace and takes two high diamonds, discard- ing a heart from his hand. All he has to lose is one trick each in hearts and clubs. Though every card lay wrong, declarer made it ap- pear that they were right! THE WARTHOG Andy sends a complete 20- volume set of the Merit Students Encyclopedia to Annette Fedor, age 11, of Lethbridge, Alberta, for her question: How did the warthog get his name? Don't feel impolite when you call this animal a warthog. He is a member of the pig family, which makes him a hog and on his face he wears the most outstanding warts in the world. True, hoggishness and warts are not polite features, as a rule. But they happen to be this fellow's most noticeable features. This remarkable wild pig lives in parts of Africa that were settled by Dutch- speaking Boers. They named him the vlakte-vark, which means the plains-pig. He was the warthog by English speaking settlers, maybe because they found his Dutch name hard to pronounce. Some folks see him as the ugliest of all animals and certainly he is no beauty. Seen from a distance on the African plains, he looks somewhat like an unkindly caricature of a smallish horse with a short neck and an oversized head. The real shock comes when you behold him close-up face to face. It is a large, oblong face covered with rough, wrinkled slatey grey skin. A pair of piggy little eyes glitter below his hairy ears. Those wicked white, up-curved moustaches are ivory tusks, a foot and sometimes two feet long. And there, out in plain sight, are the huge warts that give him his name, gristled and bristled. There may be a big warty bump beside each eye, one on each elongated cheek and another pair farther down on his long snout. Nobody can say for sure why the warthog has these warts, but we can make a couple of guesses. He lives in lion country where sometimes a face that is frightful enough to stop a clock comes in handy. The warthog trots fast enough to escape most predators. when chased by a big fast cat, he backs into a hole, usually one left by some burrowing animal. FLAVINS "TRIVIA' WITH WOODSTOCK COULP SOU CRAZf... IN THE MOVIE IMITATION OF LIFE.'CLAUPETTE COLBERT TREATS SOMEONE TO A 'STACK Of WHEATS.'.. WHO THE ACTOR I HAP FOR60TTEN ALL ABOUT NED 5PARKS! SHORT MBS byfrwko'neai ITS OUST THE PANCE HALL HER, NEW WAND LOIS by dik browne Suddenly the pursuing cat is faced with his frightful face, the glittering eyes, the businesslike tusks plus a series of bewildering warts. The mere shock may be enough to change the plans of a lioness and save the warthog's life. Then again, perhaps the outlandish bumps play a role in the mating game. Who knows, perhaps the female warthog regards warts as the very last word in irresistible masculine charm. At any rate, though she has tusks, only the male has warts. The male warthog is a sizeable wild pig, weighing up to 200 pounds. His shoulders stand almost 30 inches high, his body is five feet long plus 18 inches of lively tail. His stately skin is sprinkled with bristles and he has a horsey mane of stiff hair. He trots like a pony and when feeding he often gets down on padded knees to munch tender grasses. He also digs roots, catches small animals and in times of drought he may feed on the carcasses of larger animals. Questions asked by child- ren of Herald should be mailed to Ask Andy, P.O. Box. 765, Huntington Beach, California 92648. (Copyright Chronicle Publishing Co. 1973) HEY, HOME NEXT DOOR. IF YOU SEE CHIP WILL TELL HIM ZUMZUM DROPPED IN BUGS BUNNY KNOCK OFF LUNCH I I AM A POET AT H6AKT ...I WAS MEANT FOR BETTER WHAT LOVELY WORPSi RJUUY REQUEST THAT MINUTES IT TAKES ME THAT LONG TO STOP VIBRATING SO I CAN START EATING' BLONME by chic young PICK A NUMBER FROM ONE TOTEM IF YOU GUESS THE RIGHT NUMBER, I'LL GIVEVDU A FREE HAIRCUT IT WAS TWO AND SIX EIGHTHS AND NOBODY'S GUESSED ARCHIE by bob montana BULBS, SAAALLEK I'M A WORKS. GIVING BOTH WAYS.1 LIKE SMALLER SALARIES.' I'VE NEVER SEEN A BIGGER, BUMP HAGAR THE HORRIBLE