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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 28, 1973, Lethbridge, Alberta They gave Cindy Clark. Lethbrldge Anonymous. Lethbrldge ......1.00 Rolando Quires. 'Central America .....................1.00 Adele Cole. B.C. 1.00 Anonymous...................1.00 J. E. Morrison. Green Acres Lethbrldge ..................2.00 From 18th St. Lethbrldge 2.00 Lethbrldge Q. L. Lethbrldge .2.00 An Old Age Card- rton .........................2.00 Less Smoking This Frank .......................2.00 Love Little Card- ston .........................2.00 Mr. and Mrs A. B. Woolt. Card- ston .........................2.00 Gavin Lethbrldge .3.00 Caroline and Alex Raymond ....................3.00 LDS Lethbrldge 2nd Course Sunday nine-year-old boys and Lethbrldge .3.53 Young Worshippers of First Baptist Church. Lethbrldge .........4.38 Wendy and Patricia Milk River .......................4.50 Eleanor Warner .....4.60 G Lethbridge ...........5.00 The Lethbrldge ..5.00 M. Lethbrldge ............5.00 Skip Lethbrldge .....5.00. Wlllard A. Lethbridge ...............5.00 Henry Lethbrsdgs -----5.00 Lethbrldge 5 00 Winnie Lethbridge .5.00 Floyd Lethbridge .5.00 Lethbridge ......5.00 Lori and Shelley B.C......................5.00 Tammy Kuhn. Foremost ......5.00 Judy Coleman .......5.00 George Bow Island .5.00 Ken Magrath .........500 Norman Magrath .....5.00 Milk River .......5.00 Doris. Chester and Elolse Davis. Fort Macleod .5.00 Colin Pincher Creek .5.00 Canadian Calorie Counters B.C ..500 Satish B.C.............. 5 00 Mr. and Mrs. E. Blair- more ..................5.00 J. Coleman 5 00 Mrs. Adeline Coutts ..500 From One Who is very Fond of Cardston ..........5.00 Viv and Milk River ......5.00 Grandma and Auntie H.......5.00 The First Lethbridge Ranger Went Carrolling .10.30 The Valgardson Lethbridge .........10.00 Mr. Harry E. Lethbridge .................10.00 Lethbridge .....10.00 Lethbridge .....10.00 George and Marge Lethbridge ..........10.00 G. C Lethbrldge ..10.00 Robbie and Kevin Lethbridge 10.00 Parents of Twins and Triplets Lethbrldge ................10.00 Edgar Lethbrldge .10.00 William Clarke. Lethbrldge .10.00 Mr. and Mrs. Lethbridge 10.00 George Lethbrldge .....10.00 R. L. Lethbrldge .....10.00 Vulcan .........10.00 Women's Champion 10.00 John Gergel. Turin .........10.00 Pronghorn 4-H Beef Foremost ...................10.00 In lieu of Local Cards. Milk River .......................1000 Ingrld ......................15.00 Lethbrldge .....13.00 B.C. 15.00 Magrath United Church Sunday Magrath ............13.00 Dr. I. J. Adel. Lethbridge .20.00 Lethbridge .....20.00 Paul Pankonin and Lethbridge .................20.00 Kampen Lethbrldge .20.00 Paul Kveder's Lethbridge ................20.00 Navy Cadets and Wrenettes. R. C. Sea Cadets. Lethbridge 20.00 Grade Seven Hays .2200 A Helping Milk River .2000 William Picture Butta ......................20.00 Jonathan and Libby Spinks .20.00 In memory of Maria Pavan .25.00 In memory of Lou Wyhe .25.00 Lethbrldge .25.00 Pincher Creek .25.00 Mrs. R. Blairmore .25.00 Florence and Coaldale ...................25.00 Iron Springs Iron Springs ..................28.00 Bethany Baptist Christian Service Brigade. Lethbridge......38.40 Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Lethbridge ................30.00 New Elm Huttenan Magrath ....................30.00 Lethbridge .....50.00 In memory of James Underdahl and Jimmie Lethbridge...........50.00 Skull Springs Coaldale........... 50.00 Elm Magrath ___50.00 W. R. Myers High Taber ...................73.08 Barons Elementary Barons .....................80.00 St. Augustine's Junior Sang Dec. 22. Woolco Mall at 1 p.m 100.00 St. Augustine's Jr. Choir receipts Coaldale .5.00 Lethbridge 50.00 Mrs. Claresholm .1.00 Jean Lethbrldge .5.00 Kelly Barrett ...............2.00 Dave Coaldale .1.00 Alex Lethbrldge 20.00 Mr. and Mrs Sven Ericksen. Lethbridge ...........100.00 Sisters of St. St. Michael's General Hospital. Lethbridge 12845 Buck Krispy Music Extravagan- za .......................401.67 Total....................S1.986.91 Toial To-Kuir............S22.2I8.06 GENERAL FARM Presents the Weather SUNRISE SATURDAY SUNSET H L Pre Lethbridge...... 7 .S3 Medicine Hat 26 15 .01 Grande Prairie 20 6 .04 Edmonton 23 6 Banff........... 21 9 Calgary......... 21 11 .01 Victoria 41 33 .55 Prince Rupert... 37 28 Penticton....... 36 29 .16 Kamloops....... 35 2 Vancouver...... 41 32 .30 Saskatoon....... 3-11 .03 Regina .........17-13 Winnipeg....... 20 5 .02 Toronto........39 30 .11 Ottawa......... 38 33 .04 Montreal 35 28 .08 St. John's....... 37 21 Halifax......... 40 30 .02 Charlottetown 34 24 Fredericton..... 36 26 .01 Chicago 37 26 .02 New York 60 44 Miami.......... 77 69 Washington 66 45 Los Angeles..... 57 51 .01 San Francisco 57 55 .16 Denver......... 44 24 Las Vegas...... 54 39 Phoenix 68 49 Rome 52 32 Paris........... 45 40 London......... 50 48 Berlin.......... 45 36 Amsterdam..... 43 36 Madrid......... 48 36 Moscow 34 28 Stockholm 41 32 Tokyo.......... 59 32 Honolulu........ 83 68 Mexico City..... 66 41 FORECAST Lethbridge Medicine Hat Calgary Cloudy with periods of light snow today. Highs near 20. Lows near five below. Mostly cloudy with highs near 15. Columbia Kootenay Region Today cloudy. Oc- casional snow. Saturday mostly cloudy. A few snowflurries on the ridges. Highs both days near 25. Lows tonight around 15. MONTANA East of Continental Divide Travellers advisory southern mountains today. Snow continuing heavy today in southern mountains. Becoming scattered snows most sections tonight and Saturday. Colder Saturday. Highs today 14 to 25. Lows tonight zero to 10 above north 5 to 15 south. Highs Saturday 10 to 20. West of Continental Divide Snow decreasing today. Becoming scattered snow tonight and Saturday. Highs both days 20 to 30. Lows tonight 15 to 25. We will be closed CLOSED from Dec. 22nd thru Dec. 30th for Stock taking To all our friends and our rriany customers we extend best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year. from the Management and Staff at... FARM SUPPLIES Coutts Highway-Box 1202 Phone 328-1141 Highway 1 reported 'bare Fort Macleod is fn and dry. All remaining highways are Widening of one mile sec- in good driving ition of Highway No. 3 east oft 'PORTS OF ENTRY and Closing Carway 4 a.m. to 6 Chief Mountain Coutts 24 Bonita 9 a.m. Porthill-Rykerts 8l a.m. to Wild Horse 8 a.m. to 5 Rooseville 8 wwvviliuvi Pioneer 10 opens outer space door Refugee inflight With nearly all his worldly possessions tied to a tote a Vietnamese refugee leaves troubled Kien Due district in South Vietnam recently for the safety of government held positions in Quang Due province. North Vietnamese troops recently overran Kien Due town and now both sides are locked in a struggle for the highland hamlet. Bloody ceasefire brought some relief By WILLIAM STOCKTON MOUNTAIN Calif. Pioneer the tiny space probe that conducted the first closeup survey of the planet has opened the door to exploration of the lit- tlerknown outer solar system. The unmanned space ship has proved that engineers can design highly instrumented probes to sur- vive harsh environments. It has shown such automated machines can communicate effectively across vast dis- tances to return a wealth of scientific data. Pioneer 10 has illustrated how cheaply unmanned space probes can tell man as much as he may need to know for decades or even centuries about his solar system. Pioneer 10 cost the National Aeronautics and Space Ad- ministration a mere million plus about million for the rocket that launched it on its journey 21 months ago. The manned earth-orbiting Skylab mission cost billion and manned explora- tion of the moon. billion. But some space scientists are worried that unmanned planetary exploration will receive shrinking attention from NASA admin- congressmen and aerospace industries enamored of the more costly manned programs. The NASA budget now is slightly more than billion annually. The scientists fear that in coming years the budget will grow only to offset while development costs of the space shuttle gobble up increasing funds at the ex- pense of unmanned space ex- ploration. The space shuttle is to be a manned program in which spacecraft are launched like rockets but return to earth like airplanes to be used again and again. It may be in opera- tion by 1980. Dr. James Van the Pioneer 10 scientist who disco- vered earth's radiation is convinced that space science will almost disappear as the shuttle expands. shuttle is a tool that someday may give he said in an interview. Then with a wave of his arm about the Pioneer 10 he this has produced big results. We shouldn't trade these kinds of results for a pie- in-the-sky But Dr. James NASA dis- agrees. is not planned that the NASA science program shrink in any he said. shuttle will grow at the ex- pense of phasing out the Apollo moon Skylab and the joint American- Russian space flight in ADMIT SECRETS SOLD CHICAGO Two men have pleaded guilty to selling to a rival firm for trade secrets that the Monsanto Chemical Co. valued in the millions George W. Thornton Jr.. of Maryland and Craig W. of St. Louis were placed on probation for three years for interstate shipment of stolen goods to Chicago from St. Louis where Monsanto has headquarters. By PETER SHARROCK SAIGON The year closes as it had with Vietnam negotiations between United States State Secretary Henry Kissinger and Le Due the North Vietnamese p o 1 i t b u r o member. During every intervening month of official soldiers were wounded or captured in South Vietnam. one of history's bloodiest ceasefires did bring some relief to the long- suffering Vietnamese people who had seen fathers and sons killed in the opposing armies in every month of 1S72. The Paris peace though it did not bring cut the level of fighting to be- tween 15 to 20 per cent of what it was at the height of the U.S. involvement in the war. At year prospects for real peace and reconciliation in a political settlement between the two regimes in the South in 1974 seems no brighter than they were a few weeks after the agreement was signed. there appears to be a good chance that the fighting will continue to decrease and will be confined to the moun- tainous and border regions away from populated lowlands. The South Vietnamese gov- ernment and army and some U.S. officials say 1973 saw the Communists preparing for an offensive in 1974. senior intelligence officials and diplomats are not convinced. SEES LESS ACTION over-all pattern after the Pans agreement is decreasing military activity. The decrease continued after the June 13 joint communique and it's going said a senior western intelligence man as the Dec. 20 Kissinger-Tho meeting approached. In the the percentage of people who told public opin- ion researchers that the mili- tary had no impact on their private leisure rose to 95 per cent in the last quarter of 1973 from 40 per cent during the 1972 offensive. The reduction in the fighting resulted from the final with- drawal of the U.S. and the natural self-assertion of Viet- namese war-weariness. But the political gulf still separated President Nguyen Van Thieu and the Viet Cong. The Paris agreement put the onus on Thieu to give the Viet Cong a legal place in the political of South Viet- nam. In the Viet Cong were to give up their 12-year insurgency. But he saw any political concession as opening the door to a North Vietnamese- directed Communist takeover. He proposed timetables for general elections and the for- mation of the National Council of Reconciliation and Con- but each time inserted a clause on the withdrawal of North Vietnamese troops which was not in the Paris agreement and which he knew made the whole package automatically unacceptable to the other side. The Communists' fallback position from this deadlock was to once again build up their military option in the South and develop a third Vietnam under a Viet Cong administration. The third Vietnam was the Western slice of largely un- populated country from the old demilitarized zone to the north of plus the traditional Viet Cong secret zones in the lowlands which had fought off the control of Saigon the end of the French colonial era. Just before the ceasefire began at 8 a.m. on Jan. both armies moved in to modify the shape of this third Vietnam. Communist drives on Tay Ninh city Northwest of Saigon and on the tiny port of Sa Huynh on the central and a government drive North from the ruins of Quang Tri City below the all ended in failure and gave rise to the hardest worked cliche of the long and recriminatory ceasefire negotia- oper- The mini-offensives gave way to the larger pattern of fighting with the Communists concentrating on defending and linking up their border zones and the government reacting with bombing 100 sor- ties a by putting pressure on isolated Viet Cong enclaves in the lowlands of the delta and the central coast. Through the third Vietnam the Communists began building a gravel-topped the old Route 14 which was the only road ever cut through the moun- tains. SAIGON COMPLAINS The government made a great hue and cry over this and the work that was being done on 12 airstrips in the Viet Cong zones. The road-building led to the biggest battles in the latter half of the year in Kon- the Communists tried to occupy two villages so that the road would cross the Poko River at the best point. In Pleiku they captured a ranger base and easily turned back a government relief and in Quang Due 120 miles northeast of Saigon a stronger government reaction apparently successfully set back the plan for building that particular stretch of road. The battles and the political negotiations in a chateau out- side not even an agenda was made the Paris agreement look like a dead letter. But it had in fact brought far-reaching changes. The U.S. not only left and took their prisoners of war with they eventually publicly stated that a U.S. president might never again bomb Indochina without the approval of Congress. They also cleared the mines from North Vietnam's ports and opened talks with Hanoi on post-war reconstruction talks reaching a deadlock like all other Viet- nam talks. Cambridge team plans self-sustaining house 1517 MAYOR MAGRATH DRIVE By RICHARD 0'REAGAN England A Cambridge Univer- sity research team plans to build a house next year that will be run solely by the the the rain and the waste of its occupants. The team plans to create a house for the future that can generate its own sources of power from nature en- tirely independent of outside systems of water and sewage. are not trying to create a house for a drop-out society or for ecology freaks but one that will allow us to maintain our present standards of living with no more sacrifices than we will have to make when we run into future energy crises in 20 to 30 says Alex- ander head of the team. homes contribute much to our suicidal waste of energy. We can use our own our ex- provide methane gas for cooking. baths haven't improv- ed since Minoan of the heat runs out with the bath water. We feel we can recapture the heat and recy- cle the bath using both again. can use the sun and the wind to provide heat and light for our homes and run our refrigerators. If we cannot generate quite enough power in our self-sufficient we do not think it is going to diminish our living standards to dispense with such items as eiectric carving No Fuss No Muss Slider and double hinge box unit window. Fits same opening. Aluminum sash travelling in vinyl spring loaded track. Storm and screen includ- ed. Finger tip touch to remove and clean from in- side. Also agents and applicators for Kaiser Wood aluminum siding. Windows installed at cost with siding order. PANTHER BUILDING SUPPLIES LTD. Box Alberta The Management and Staff of the Golden Bridge Restaurant w'ould like to thank all their customers for their patronage over the past year and wish everyone a HAPPY NEW YEAR HOLIDAY NEW YEAR'S 31st Open Till 2 a.m. NEW YEAR'S 1st Open 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. PICK-UP OR DELIVERY SERVICE Phone PHONE 328-2525 or 328-5677 Drop In often and enjoy the finest In pleasant surroundings i ;