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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 18, 1974, Lethbridge, Alberta 44 THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD Wednesday, Dcctmbtr 18, 1974 Soviet consumer convinced things getting better By ARCH MacKENZIE MOSCOW (CP) There was no price tag on the mo- torcycles or the smart little glass-fibre motorboat in the store window. "Those are just for tour- sniffed the Soviet citi- zen. "They aren't for us." Nevertheless, the impres- sion remains after a 12-day visit to three Soviet cities that. the Soviet consumer probably has never had it so good and is firmly convinced that it will get better. Canadian ownership VANCOUVER (CP) Canadian ownership of the Mercantile Bank of Canada will reach 72.4 per cent with the issuing of new shares planned for next month, the bank's president said this week. Paul H. Austin said that if the bank completes its share issue program next year it will have fulfilled its Cana- dian ownership objective five years ahead of schedule. In 1971 the bank committed itself to 75 per cent ownership by Canadians before 1980. Mr. Austin said First National City Bank of New York will own slightly less than 25 per cent of Mercan- tile's shares after next year. He said the bank's policy of consulting with Citibank to ob- tain expertise not otherwise available to it is unchanged. Total shares of the bank's stock have tripled to six million since 1971. NOTICE ANGLO STEREO PHOTO 419 -5th Streets. ISJNQI ASSOCIATED with Acme Merchandise Distributors or any other firm. We have one store ONLY at 419 5th Street South. Food seems ample. Rank on rank of apartments continue to rise, monotonous and even depressing by west- ern standards but sharp im- provements on existing hous- ing. Automobiles are sur- prisingly numerous, most owned by the state but others in private hands, and produc- tion is increasing steadily. Western technology is in- volved to some extent. At the Bolshoi Theatre, there may well be as much eye shadow and as many plat- form soles as at the Ottawa National Art Centre. There is lengthy male hair, much of it modishly contoured. CONCERNS SIMILAR "There's a lot of money says a Soviet citizen who recently acquired a sum- mer cottage 40 miles out of Moscow. He adds, in a parody of the current-day complaint by Ca- nadian urban dwellers: "But good places close to the city are getting hard to find." Conversations with officials showed rising concern about some of the same issues con- fronting North American urban sprawl and preservation of historic material. The official line is that the Soviet consumer price index, the gauge of how much or- dinary people pay to live, hasn't changed since the mid- 1960s. That's in contrast with in- creases of as much as 10 per cent or more a year in living costs for most countries caught up in the international scramble of upward com- modity costs including energy. It is true that the Soviet Un- ion, like China and Canada, is largely self-reliant for energy, food, resources and tech- nology and therefore is better protected than most against inflation. But there is a strong suspi- cion among economists that holding the cost of living ab- solutely steady today is a trick done with mirrors. Soviet prices still look pret- ty good, although alcohol is costing more and an auto costs about Housing continues to ex- pand in the shape of pre- fabricated apartments of nine, 11 and 14 storeys, all the same model. At the subsidized rental rates, a young couple may get something for about But the housing shortage re- mains acute despite the addi- tion of more than 40 million units since 1956. No other country has built more in that period. Moscow makes room for an- other a year, people drawn from the country or other cities or newborn. In Leningrad, the municipal master-planning group has embarked on a vast scheme to throw up apartment housing on reclaimed land on the Gulf of Finland. Leningrad's master plan, created in 1966, includes a re- duction of 22 per cent in the population of the central core. Old Tbilisi, capital of wine- growing Georgia far to the south, recorded its millionth citizen in September and the mayor says limits are being placed on adding new in- dustry. Too much industry makes too many people, he says, pointing to efforts to clean up environmental pollution. He projects an annual growth rate of about 10 per cent. For the ordinary worker in the vast country of 250 mil- lion, all the surface in- dications point to plenty of places for spending money. Appliances continue to be on the primitive side in ap- pearance, something like British refrigerators or clothes washers of the early 1950s. A vacuum cleaner is priced at 35 to 60 rubles or with one ruble worth at the highly-artificial official rate about Canadian. There are kitchen mixers, irons and a small, rickety- looking dishwasher for about 75 rubles. There is lots of plastic luggage on display, hockey sticks and footwear. Stores falling behind their sales "norms" may stay open late at night or seven days a week around payday. Food stores are plentiful and well attended but the chief drawback continues to be distribution, Soviet resi- dents say. A shipment of ba- nanas from Cuba will flood Moscow markets and then vanish. Still, the official price for Soviet basic foods makes their brand of price and wage control look appetizing in to- day's inflationary context. A dozen eggs sells for about 16 cents and a loaf of black rye bread costs about 18 cents. Yogurt is a fraction of the Canadian price. But Soviet price and wage control cuts off consumer items as well as the motor- boat and motorcycles. Take a bottle of Georgian cognac outside the dollar stores reserved for foreign tourists. Inside, the cost was about or less. Outside, it was available to Soviet citizens for 14 rubles or the equivalent of Oil pollution threatens Arctic, says scientist By ARCH MacKENZIE LENINGRAD (CP) A slow but regular Arctic cool- ing has been charted over the last 20 years but that doesn't mean another ice age is im- minent, suggests the senior Soviet scientist heading the Arctic and Antarctic Re- search Institute here. But Dr. Alexei F. Tres- hnikof suggests that a major hazard to northern waters is the pollution that may flow from American development of Alaska's North Slope oil. Traces of oil pollution from Gutf of Mexico drilling have already been detected in Ar- ctic waters, says Dr. Tres- hnikof. In an interview with a Ca- nadian journalist delegation, he expressed concern that the Alaskan North Slope "will greatly increase the danger of pollution and we see no evi- REO Si PHOTO ICHARGEX 419 -5th Streets. OPEN EVERY NIGHT UNTIL 9 p.m. UNTIL. CHRISTMAS Phone 328-6661 You can expect a lot from these cameras and get it dence of any serious pre- ventive measures being taken yet." Any oil-tainted water would sweep through the Arctic ba- sin on prevailing currents un- der the ice pack, he suggests. Concern about Arctic pollu- Treshnikof said the Soviets so far have managed to avoid any oil on evidence that Arctic oil cleanups will prove extremely difficult. MIGHT MELT ICE An entire new technology would be needed for oil spilled under Arctic ice, suggest studies done in the Canadian Arctic at Resolute Bay, N.W.T. Major spills might lead to ice melting and in- creased water temperatures. Treshnikof said he visited Alaska three years ago and asked for evidence of pollu- tion preventive measures but had not yet received any that satisfied him. At the same time, he out- lined in detail the extensive Soviet interest in the Antarc- tic and some of the institute projects there, which suggest considerable interest by the Soviet Union in any petroleum resources there. Treshnikof, a big bear of a man who has served in both the Arctic and Antarctic, heads the institute created by Lenin in 1920 and now con- centrating much of its work on ensuring the success of what has become a vital So- viet shipping artery, the northeast sea route. NO NEW ICE AGE In response to questions, he said: HP doubts personally that the world is verging on any new ice age although a slow but regular Arctic cooling has occurred over the last 20 years. huge nuclear icebreaker, the power Arctic, is being added to the northern sea route. The first was the power Lenin. Soviet Arctic is rela- tively untainted with pollution major northern rivers are clean. U.S.S.R. still mans two to three floating ice islands at a first was part of its big polar research program. The institute, which Prime Minister Trudeau visited in 1971, now operates as a hy- drology centre issuing long- range and short-range fore- casts for the northern ship- ping route. The route carries half the Soviet timber supply, at least a fifth of its pulp and paper, most of its nickel and dia- monds, half of its furs, a third of its fish and huge quantities of gold, tin, tungsten and other minerals and ores. The first complete icebreaker voyage was made in 1932 and the northern route began booming after the Second World War. That route, coupled with the geographical-geological na- ture of the Soviet North, creates a major distinction between it and the Canadian North. That is accessibility. Can- ada's Arctic islands form a barrier that was last exposed when the American tanker Manhattan tried fruitlessly in 1969 and 1970 to penetrate from east to west, with crude oil transport in mind. The Soviet institute and its one scientist accompanies every ship on the northern route, in use from June to October-Novem- a forecast ac- curacy mark of about 80 per cent. "Icebreakers can handle ice up to two metres (about 6V2 feet) thick, but some pressure ridges are five times that said Treshnikof. That makes it necessary for ship captains to manoeuvre through ice as well as break it and that's one reason in- stitute scientists accompany each vessel. The Soviets use inter- national data to supplement their own weather material derived from satel- lites, aircraft, manned ice islands and more than 20 automatic unmanned weather stations a year. These usually last only a few months on the ice pack. In late October, there were still five operating from last April. In addition to the heavy breakers for major ice prob- lems, the Soviet fleet contains numerous smaller craft to keep shipping moving on less troublesome stretches and in northern ports. A keen watch is maintained for any buildup in Arctic pol- lution because of the fact that the northern environment pur- ges itself so slowly. SUPER CM-300 Super 8 cartridge loading: Ultra sharp 9-30 mm 3.3 to 1 zoom lens: aerial image focusing. Oversize, extra-bright reflex view- finder: closes focusing distance 1.3 Tn. (4.5 ft.) Push-button power and manual indicator onside of camera: Under-exposure warning in viewfinder: automatic exposure setting for film speeds ASA40-160 (Type built in battery checker: film transport and film end indicator in viewfinder: 1 and 18 fps filming: built-in type A filter: eyepiece diopter ad- justment with lock; automatic re- turn film footage counter: Movie- light and tripod mounts; electric remote control socket; cable release socket for con- tinous run; cable release socket for single frame exposure; shutter release trigger lock and power off switch; integral snap-action foldawat pistol grip with built-in battery compartment; detachable wrist strap OURPRICE MF-303 Macro-rocus system with 10 piece titling and special effects kit, Super 8 cartridge loading. Ultra-sharp 9-30 mm 3.3 to 1 macro zoom lens; up to 0 mm macro-focusing mechanism (ultra close up) Aerial image focusing; over- size, extra-bright reflex viewfinder; Push-button power and manual zoom; automatic through-the-iens CdS ex- posure meter with manual over- ride; indicator on side of camera, under-exposure warning in viewfinder; auto- matic exposure setting for film speeds ASA 40-160 (Type AO built in battery checker. Film Transport and film end indicator in viewfinder; 1 and 18 fps filming speeds; built in type A filter, eye- piece diopter adjustment with lock: automatic resetting film footage counter; rnovielight and tripod mounts; electric remote control socket. Cable release socket for continuous run; cable release socket single frame exposure. Shutter release trigger lock and power off switch, integral snap- action foldaway pistol grip with built-in battery compart- ment. Detachable wrist strap. OURPRiCE 143 MF-404 Macro-Focus system with 10 piece titling and special effects kit; Super 8 cartridge loading. Ultra-sharp 8.5-35 mm 4 to 1 macro zoom lens; up to 0 mm-focusing mechanism (ultra close up) Aerial image focusing with cross hair adjustment; over- size, extra bright reflex view- finder; push-button power and manual zoom, automatic through-the-lens; CdS ex- posure meter with manual over ride; indicator on side of camera; under exposure warning in viewfinder. auto- matic exposure setting for film speeds ASA 40-160 (Type Built in battery checker, film transport and film end indicator viewfinder. 1 and 18 fps filming speeds: built in type A filter; eyepiece diop- ter adjustment with lock, auto- matic resetting; film footage counter, movie light and tripod mount. Electric remote con- trol socket, cable release socket for continuous run cable release for single frame exposure; shutter release trig- ger lock and power off switch; integral snap-action fold- away pistol grip with built-in battery compartment; detachable wrist strap. OUR PRICE MF-606 Macro-Focus system with 10 piece titling and 'special effects kit. Super 8 cartridge loading; ultra sharp 8-48 mm 6 to 1 macro zoom lens; built-in retractable lens hood; up to 0 mrn macro focusing machanism (ultra close up) microprism focusing; oversize, extra bright reflex view- finder; pushbutton power and manual zoom, automatic through-the-lens CdS exposure meter with manual over- ride; indicator in view finder; under and over exposure warning in viewfinder. Auto- matic exposure setting for film speeds ASA 40-160 (Type A) Built in battery checker; film transport and film end indicator in viewfinder; 1, 18 and 36 fps (instant slow motion) filming speeds; built in type A filter; eyepiece diopter ad- justment with lock; automatic reseting film footage counter, movie-light and tripod mounts. Electric remote control socket; Cable release socket for con- tinuous run; cable release socket for single frame, exposure, shutter release trigger lock and poweroff switch. Integral snap- action foldaway pistol grip with built-in battery compart- ment. Detachable wrist strap. OURPRICE 235 LXL-255 MACRO Low light movie camera; Super 8 cartridge loading; Ultra-sharp 9-22.5 mm 2.5 to 1 Macro focus zoom lens; up to 0 mm macro focusing mechanism (ultra close up) 220 shutter opening. Aerial image focusing; oversize, extra bright reflex viewfinder, push-button power and manual zoom, automatic through the lens CdS ex- posure meter with manual over ride indicator on side of camera; under exposure warning in viewfinder: auto- matic exposure setting for film speeds ASA 40 160 (Type built in battery checker; film transport and film end indicator in viewfinder; 1, 9 and 18 fps filming speeds; built in type A filter; eyepiece diopter adjustment with lock, film footage counter; movie-light and tripod mounts; electric remote con- trol socket; cable release socket for single frame exposure: shutter release trigger lock and power off switch; integral snap- action foldaway pistol grip with built-in battery case; Detachable wrist strap: -10 piece titling and special effects kit. OURPRICE 240 Politics disrupt copper mining VANCOUVER (CP) Politics, directly and in- directly, are helping to dis- rupt British Columbia's hefty copper mining operations. The province's New Democratic Party government, the closest at hand and the easiest to kick, is being blamed maybe somewhat unfairly for wholesale layoffs and curbed production at the 17 B.C. mines that produce 700 million tons of copper a year. Even the companies, staunch foes of the NDP at the best of times, say that the mineral royalties act passed last spring is only No. 3 on the list of problems. No. 1 villain is the world price for copper, down from a high of on the London Market Exchange earlier this year to less than 60 cents this week. The No. 2 problem is soar- ing mine costs because of wages and equipment increases. P. R. Mathew, secretary Montana mill gets permit HELENA, Mont. (AP) The department of health and environmental sciences has issued a permit for the million expansion of the Hoerner Waldorf paper mill west of Missoula. manager of the B.C. Mining Association, said this week there are mine employees laid off out of a total work force, including of- fice staff, of International politics had a major role in price tur- narounds. The copper boom in 1973 and early 1974 coincided with the tenure of the Communist Salvador Allende regime in Chile. Prices went up when Allende nationalized that country's United States controlled copper industry and demanded a higher return from foreign buyers. workers laid off WOLFSBURG (AP) Volkswagen announced today the one-week layoff of workers, the 10th major layoff this year by West Germany's largest automotive company. A company spokesman said the layoff affected plants in Hannover, Brunswick, Kassel and Salzgitter. The largest of the six domestic Volkswagen plants, in Wolfsburg, and one in Emden were not affected. ;