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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 17, 1974, Lethbridge, Alberta Tuesday, December 17, 1974 THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD 3 THEY GAVE Following is a list of those who have contributed to the Cup of Milk Fund. Mr. and Mrs. Norman Bonneau, Blair- more .........................2.00 Anonymous ...................2.00 Mrs. Lillian Pitt, Lethbridge 3.00 Mrs. Emily White, Jaffray, B.C. 3.00 Louis Blair, Jaffray ...........3.00 The North Crochet Club, Lethbridge....................3.00 From a person who loves to give, Lethbridge....................3.50 Billy and Susan, Lethbridge 4.00 Mrs. Maisie O'Neil, Claresholm. 4.00 Mrs. Pearl Severtson, Lethbridge 4.00 H. Hollander, Monarch.........5.00 Anonymous ...................5.00 Geoffery, Brian, Collette and Karren Price.........................5.00 In memory of Dave Martin.....5.00 Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Price, Taber 5.00 Box 148, Foremost.............5.00 William Pansky, Fort Macleod.. 5.00 Jennifer jarina, age 5 months, Sparwood.....................5.00 Mrs. Rebecca Loo, Lethbridge 5.00 Mr. and Mrs. Frank Adams, Lethbridge.................... 5.00 Anonymous...................5.00 Mrs. Linda Oixbn, Lethbridge 5.00 Hank Van de Beek, Lethbridge 5.00 Senior Citizen.................5.00 In memory of Leanna Heujdens. 5.00 Anonymous...................5.00 J. Mooris, Magrath............5.QO D. C. Lethbridge ..............5.00 Mr. and Mrs. I. R. Cropley.....5.00 The Desjarlais children........8.00 Mrs. Fakir....................8.00 Mr. Fakir 10.00 Anonymous 10.00 Anonymous..................10.00 Alice Boyle.................. 10.00 Barbara Boyle 10.00 Anonymous, Lethbridge....... 10.00 Anonymous 10.00 Tom Shackleford 10.00 Anonymous 10.00 Mrs. Valer's St. Basil's Church CWL Group, Lethbridge............10.00 West Wind Unifarm, Pincher Creek 10.00 Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Cisar, Pincher Creek 10.00 Marie L. Loescher, Lethbridge. 10.00 Anonymous 10.00 Jack R. Lorge, Coaldale ......10.00 Kathleen Mary Marshall, Taber 10.00 Mrs. N. Burkholder, Lethbridge 10.00 Miss A. M. Krulak, Lethbridge 10.00 A Friend 10.00 Anonymous 10.00 Michael, Jamie, Barry and Paul. Ccghlin...................... 10.00 Anonymous 10.00 Anonymous 10.00 UNITED MOTORS CO. LTD. Weather SUNRISE WEDNESDAY SUNSET H L Pre Lethbridge...... 47 32 Pincher Creek... 46 30 Medicine Hat 42 36 Vermilion....... 29 14 Edmonton 37 28 Grande Prairie 40 25 Banff........... 33 29 Calgary......... 54 22 Victoria........ 55 35 .16 Penticton....... 41 39 .06 Prince George 42 29 .04 Kamloops....... 44 36 .03 Vancouver...... 53 43 .17 Saskatoon....... 24 20 Regina......... 27 17 Winnipeg....... 18 3 .01 Toronto......... 40 33 .02 Ottawa......... 29 26 1.04 Montreal 30 25 .94 St. John's....... 32 30 .32 Halifax......... 31 28 Charlottetown 30 28 Fredericton..... 27 25 .13 Chicago 36 28 .03 New York 47 39 1.98 Miami.......... 81 70 Los Angeles.....82 56 Las Vegas...... 65 39 Phoenix 67 38 FORECAST: Lethbridge Medicine Hat Regions Sunny today. Highs near 45 this morning but dropping to the upper 30s by this afternoon. Overnight lows near 25. Wednesday: Mostly cloudy and cooler. Highs near 30. Calgary Region Cloudy periods. Winds northwesterly 20 and gusting this morning. Highs today near 40. Over- night lows 15 to 20. Wednesday: Mostly cloudy and cooler. Highs 25 to 30. Columbia Kootenay Region Today cloudy with sunny periods. A few snowflurries near the moun- tains. Wednesday becoming cloudy with intermittent snow in the evening. Highs today in the low 30s. Lows tonight in the mid 20s. Highs Wednesday near 35. MONTANA East of Continental Divide Varriable cloudiness with scattered showers today decreasing tonight. Gusty winds most sections today. Colder today and Wednesday. Fair Wednesday. Highs today 40 to 50. Lows tonight 10 to 25. Highs Wednesday mostly 30s. West of Continental Divide Scattered rain or snow showers today decreasing tonight. Partly cloudy Wednesday. Highs both days 30s. Lows tonight 10 to 20. Amy, Vickie, Kerby, Coaldale 10.00 Mrs. Pauline Smith, Lethbridge 15.00 Anonymous.................. 15.00 The Roskams ................15.00 Mr and Mrs. Ki Cheong Au, Lethbridge................... 15.00 Mr. and Mrs. Jack Klinger, Lethbridge................... 15.00 Medical Record Department, St. Michael's General Hospital, Lethbridge...................17.00 Hays Grade 9 Class and J. G. Engel, principal, Hays............... 19.00 Anonymous ..................20.00 Anonymous, Lethbridge.......20.00 Arie and Gerry Den Boon, Fort Macleod..................... 20.00 Anonymous, Lethbridge.......20.00 Frank Frey, Pincher Creek___20.00 The Petersons of Enchant.....20.00 Dr. F. H. Mewburn QBE Chapter IODE, Lethbridge............20.00 Antelope Ridge Women's Institute, Magrath.....................20.00 Charlie and Mary-Rachel......25.00 Mrs. S. Rennie, J5; Wm. Broadfoot Family, 120..................25.00 Fort Macleod Meat Processors Ltd., Fort Macleod ................30.00 Anonymous..................50.00 Central Farms Ltd., Coaldale 75.00 Civil Service Association of Alberta, Branch 65 Crowsnest, Blair- more 100.00 Boehr Contracting Ltd., Lethbridge.................. 100.00 Bigelow Fowler Clinic, Lethbridge..................250.00 Total Total to Date Sextuplet dies SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) Another of the Lange sex- tuplets born nine days ago died today, leaving only two of the premature infants left in their battle for life. Dr. James Harrod said a boy, Jason, died at Valley Medical Centre of respiratory failure. He was the youngest of the six infants and weighed the most at birth, two pounds four ounces. FINAL WEEK-END CLEARANCE ON ALL W TRAILERS CAMPERS MOTOR HOMES All new and rental units MUST BE CLEARED Sat., 9 a.m.-6 p.m., UNITED MOTORS CO. LTD. "Serving you over a quarter Century" 302 3rd Ave. South Phono 327-2805 PORTS OF ENTRY opening and closing times: Carway 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Chief Mountain, closed; Coutts open 24 hours; Del Bonita 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Kingsgate open 24 hours; Porthill Rykerts 7 a.m. to 2 a.m.; Rooseville 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. (Times Mountain Picture yourself as second quarter millionaire BUY YOUR TICKETS AT MOST CREDIT UNIONS THE WESTERN CANADA LOTTERY More than in total prizes! 1908 lucky people will win! Ticket sales close January 15th. 1975 Preliminary Draw January 31st. 1975 Publishers say they need strong federal backing OTTAWA (CP) Canadian- owned publishing firms will require strong federal backing to recover ground lost to foreign-owned companies, the Independent Publishers Association (IPA) said in a brief today to Secretary of State Hugh Faulkner. The brief said foreign com- panies dominate all sectors of the domestic English- language publishing market with Canadian companies ac- counting for only 10 per cent of total sales. It was estimated that only three per cent of the textbooks purchased by schools last year were produced by Canadian companies, although 32 per cent were written by Canadians. "Despite the rapidly dimin- ishing involvement of Cana- dian-owned firms in educational publishing there has been no serious response by any government in the brief said. A recent IPA study in- dicated that production costs in Canada were 20 per cent higher than in the United States. "Publishers of educational books in Canada find them- selves caught between a shrinking market and rapidly rising manufacturing costs." PRICES HURT SALES Domestic producers of text- books and other publications "are forced to charge prices that restrict seriously the pon- tential sales of their books." "People are not willing and do not expect to pay more for Canadian titles than for com- parable imported titles." Large foreign-owned publishing firms also are attracting some of the best Canadian authors, said the brief. General Publishing, the only Canadian-owned mass paperback producer, planned to publish 50 Canadian books next year. "However, the company is concerned that it may lose a considerable number, of the potentially bestselling titles to the American mass paper- back firms." The IPA brief said that about 77 per cent of the publishing industry is U.S.- owned with 16 per cent Canadian-owned and about seven per cent in British hands. The Canadian segment had been declining for at least 15 years while the U.S. seg- ment had been expanding. Several approaches could be made: Force foreign subsi- diaries to sell out to Canadians, a move the report says would be fraught with political problems; set a mirjimum domestic ownership level; concentrate on support of existing Canadian firms. EXTEND CONTROLS This last approach would re- quire a series of steps including extension of foreign investment controls into the publishing field. Most publishing concerns now are too small to be covered by the Foreign Investment Review Act, but the government has said it plans to extend the act to assist such companies. The IPA calls for federal lOw-interest loans to Canadian owned publishing companies and federal-provincial aid to ensure a strong presence in the educational book field. The government should help in developing a "healthy, Canadian-owned, mass paper- back industry" and regulate the distribution industry to give domestic authors and publishers a fair exposure. Measures to offset the strong U.S. book clubs through the establishment of "one or more strong Canadian clubs" also are needed, the brief said. It recommends that clubs not offering at least the same proportion of Canadian titles as sold in about 20 per not be given the advantage of the lower mail rate for books. Consideration should be given to provision of start-up money to develop domestic book clubs. Federal funds should be used to set up a program to increase the number of Cana- dian titles in libraries, the IPA recommended. In addition, copyright laws should be tightened "to give the Canadian copyright holder exclusivity in the Canadian market" and to provide more severe penalties for importers of illegal editions. Senate passes abortion on demand PARIS (Reuter) The French Senate approved by 182 to 91 Sunday a controversial draft law making abortion on demand available during the first 10 weeks of pregnancy. It was the last serious hurdle for legalized abortion in this predominantly Roman Catholic country, although minor amendments will force the bill before ifie National Assembly Wednesday and again to the Senate for the last time Thursday. The three-day Senate debate was much calmer than the highly charged one in the as- sembly two weeks ago. Then Health Minister Simone Veil herself a one time concentration camp inina LC was accused of introducing Nazi style euthanasia in France. Among the Senate amend- ments was one making it com- pulsory for a woman to consult a social worker before having an abortion. Another barred clinics and hospitals from performing abortions only one in four operations can be abortions. An opinion poll last week showed almost 60 per cent of the public in favor of abortion on demand in the first 10 weeks of pregnancy. Under the draft law the operation must be carried out in an approved clinic or hospital. Girls under 18 must obtain parental permission. The cost will not be reim- bursed under the state social security system but the government has set a limit on charges. Alberta to encourage private risk capital in oil, gas industry CALGARY (CP) An Al- berta corporate tax and in- centive system designed to en- courage investors and corpo- rations not directly engaged in the oil industry to invest in it will be introduced in two or three years, Premier Peter Lougheed announced Monday. "We will also press the fed- eral .-government for changes in personal and corporate tax he told members of the Alberta Stock Exchange. The Alberta Stock Ex- change, formerly the Calgary stock exchange, was officially opened by the premier Mon- day. The new stock exchange, will broaden its functions as Alberta's economy diversifies and will serve as a financial clearing house for the province, said exchange general manager John Thom- son. Mr. Lougheed, elaborating on the Alberta petroleum ex- ploration plan which he an- nounced Thursday, said under existing laws Canadians are at a disadvantage when they invest in the Canadian oil in- dustry compared to foreign investors. "We want to encourage more private risk capital in the oil and gas he said, adding that private risk capital is especially impor- tant for small, Canadian and independent oil companies which cannot generate suf- ficient internal funds as mul- tinationals firms ran And U.S. risk capital now is largely reinvested in the United States because of the U.S. energy shortage and the political climate in Canada, Mr. Lougheed did not give details of the proposed cor- porate tax and incentive program. The premier said later in an interview that the petroleum exploration plan was announc- ed to help the oil industry, not as a result of pressure from Ottawa. To the young and young-at-heart. Our holiday wishes...heartfelt appreciation. WORLD OF SHOES 317A Sixth Street South From Lethbridge to Lucerne OnlyVQisVQ Canada's YQ the world's largest selling CanadianWhisky CO-OP 7 Stores TO SERVE YOU BETTER! BARONS. BOW ISLAND.CARDSTON. COALDALE. LETHBRIDGE, PICTURE BUTTE. TABER, Lethbridge, 1221-2nd AvanueS. Phone 329-0017 "Magic Chef" DISHWASHER A Magic Chef Dishwasher can lighten your kitchen chores in several ways. In addition to dis- hwashing, it can be used as a plate warmer and its full family table setting capacity enables you to economize by running fuller loads less often. There is no need to pre-rinse dishes before loading. Simply remove large particles such as bones, fruit pits, etc and the built-in soft food dis- poser will remove the rest. Upper and lower spray arm assures thorough cleaning, water temperatures of 140 to 160 means dishes are completely sterilized and easy front loading are plus features you'll find in a Magic Chef. Simply connect the water connection to the kitchen sink faucet, load, and your Magic Chef Dishwasher will do the rest. Pre-Christmas DISHWASHER Maple Cutting Board Top 6 Big Cycles Harvest Gold or White CHRISTMAS SPECIAL ;