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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 10, 1971, Lethbridge, Alberta THE IETHBRIDCE HERALD Friday, December 50, 1971 Rocky Mountain Livestock Show and Sale What started as an idea with the- Li'thhridge and Dis- trict became an instant favorite with livestock exhibitors and daily gained increased acceptance with the general public. The Rocky jMcuntain Uve- stock Show 'and Sa'.c Monday to Friday, sponsored by the exhibition board and seven southern Alberta purebred associations, was a pilot pro- ject in winter livestock shows for Canada. The key to the project was federal government financial support of about S10.COO or f.alf the prize money. The Canada department of agriculture, has always parti- cipated financially in sum- mer fairs across the country giving various amounts ef money. Factors influencing the amount vary witli the dif- ferent agricultural fairs. Vince MacDonald. livestock supervisor in Alberta for the CDA, said Hie government realizes the most important factor in the continued growth of agricultural fairs is change. The real place to educate urban families to remove all 'ho mysteries of agriculture is at livestock product pro- motion shows. Lcthbridge had the fir.-t successful show of this type during the 1971 Whoop-Up Days celebrations. During this show, the swine, shcrp end cattle, industries were promoted with live ani- mal, dressed carcass, taste sample, by-product and in- formation literature displays the public could learn about livestock. Experts in all segments of the industries were on hand to discuss anything with the urban family. As added imp2'.us for the decision to RO to a winter show. Red Deer had sched- uled its summer livestock show and sale for the same days. Since there weren't enough quality herds to make both sTiows a success, Lsth- bridge decided (o go ahead with the product promotion show aimed at educating the average urban citizen. The organizers decided to go to an open international show and sale with a major objective of trying to encour- age the additional participa- tion of breeders with small herds. The end result of the plan- ning was producer-participa- tion to the extent of taxing the facilities at the Ijeth- bridge Exhibition Grounds to the maximum. The total show and sale at- tracted 295 head of cattle. Gurnsey and Holstein dairy herds and Charolais, short- horn, Hereford and Aber- deen-Angus cattle from the best breeders in Western Canada were shown and many sold. From the swine industry, Landrace, Lacombe, York- shire and Polish boars and gilts totalling ICO were shown with 48 sold. Some of the best animals in Canada partici- pated. There were 70 sheep from Columbia, Corriedale, Ram- bouillet. Rcmnelet, Dorset Horns, Hampshires, N.C. Che- viots, Southdown and Suffolk breeds. Again some of the duality stock from Western Canada was represented. Alike Harris, southern Al- berta superintendent for CDA, said the success of this rji'ot project will not be known for some time. If this show is a success and if enough exhibition boards in Canada request si- milar shows, then it could be- come a regular event, he said. Swine and Iamb carcass competition Story: Ric Swihart; Photos; Walter Kerber Grooming animals and cleaning work takes its toll Show is not all roses for exhibitors Sheep get final trim befose entering the show ring Painstaking work needed to prepare bulls for the show ring Student tours get first-hand information on livestock industry ;