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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 3, 1909, Lethbridge, Alberta IRRIGATION TESTS CONTINUED PROM PAGE EIGHT North Dakota White Champion White Pearl Mercer Davidson Dent .8 630 300 1050 340 430 830 7 .7 1400 7 .7 630 g .G 320 5 .6 C50 6 .On irrigated farms where dairying Is carried on It is perhaps more raise mangels to give succulency rather than raise corn and put it in a silo. It is certainly more convenient and economical for the one who has not the silo built. Mangels fed with well cured Alfalfa nay make a well balanced ration and one on twhich cows will produce a grea't deal of lliilk. Ten varieties were tested as follows: Variety yield tons Ibs. Half Kjugar White ............................24 8-10 ......e Post....................................28 200 Champion ...........................22 880 ammotii Red 220 Giant Yellow Intermediate ....................21 900 Giant Yellow Globe 920 Yellow Intermediate .........................18 300 erfection Mam. Long Red .17 1640 Mam. Long Red 1540 Selected Yellow Glove 340 SUNDAY MAIL SERVICES IS WANTED Board Of Trade Has Passed Resolution The council of the Board of Trade at one present held its regular o'clock yesterday. meeting Those Eleven varieties of Turnips were tested and they yielded as v ariety Yield tons Ibs. ikammoth Clyde..............................25 1GO ....................................24 840 Halewood's Bronze Top .......................23 860 rerfection Swede .............................21 1560 Carter's Elephant 240 Kangaroo ....................................20 1680 Jumbo 920 Hall's Westbury..............................19 280 Magnum Bonum..............................18 960 Good Luck...............................___1C 1000 Bangholm Selected............................10 340 Carrots Five varieties of Carrots were tested with the following results: ariety Yield tons Ibs. Ontario Champion ............................14 1700 Half Long Chantenay 1720 White Belgian ...............................12 750 Improved Short White....................... 12 750 Mammoth White Intermediate C 1860- Varietv Sugar Beets Yield ions Ibs. Klein Wanzleben............................24 1500 French Very Rich ..----------..................24 510 Vilmorin's Improved ----.....................24 510 Klein Wanzleben, Raymond Seed ..............18 630 Potatoes Potatoes are destined to become a leading: crop on irrigated farm especially will this be the case when it will be possible to have land tha has been enriched by the growing of Alfalfa for a few years to plow up and plant with this crop. Twenty varieties of potatoes were tested witi the following Variety Yield bus Ibs. State of Maine ................................646 48 Empire State ..................................618 12 Irish Cobbler 0 Seedling ..............................587 24 American Wonder ----.........................567 26 Rose ...............................521 24 Money Maker.................................517 0 Vick's Extra Early, ..........................1.510 24 Late Puritan..................................459 48 Js.olborn Abundance...........................437 48 Everett .....'.................................426 48 Dreer's Standard ...............................422 24 Dalmeny Beauty ___..........................404 48 .Early Manlstee...............................402 36 Vermont Gold Coin ...........................371 48 carman No. 1 36 Ashleaf Kidney 36 Reeves Rose ..................................347 '36 ..____..................................286 0 Uncle Gideon's Quick Lunch ....................213 84 Alfalfa On account of not having any old land it was not thought advisable to plant a very large acreage of Alfalfa in the season of 1908, but in the latter-part of May of that year a few acres were sown. One of the ex- periments was to determine the best quantity of seed to sow per acre. The following table gives the results obtained during the past season. It would be only fair to mention that an exceptionally fine stand was obtained. Just after the seed was sown very timely rains came and practically every seed sown grew, which Is a condition that cannot always be relied upon This should be borne in mind in studying the results. Amt of seed Ibs. 5 10 15 20 25 30 1st cutting June 24 tons Ibs. 3rd cutting Sept. 13 tons Ibs. Total yield for season tons Ibs. 1S40 200 680 200 0 280 220 1040 1180 1220 1280 1200 1060 520 1340 1100 680 1000 2nd cutting Aug. 4 tons Ibs. 2 1000 1280 L 1480 1! 1680 I 1400 1520 The second cutting was not cured quite as dry as it might have been before it was hauled the barn, consequently the yield on the second cutting for alt of the plots is a trifle high. As mentioned above an ex- tremely good stand was obtained on. account of the rains coming when they did and the seed bed being in such an ideal condition. Under ordin- ary circumstances such conditions cannot be relied upon and so five or ten of seed, as a rule, do not give as good a stand as was here obtained. Observation and experience in the district would indicate that twenty pounds of seed on irrigated land is about the right amount to sow. Experiments with Innoculation When the Alfalfa was sown in May, 1908, the land was all innoculated. except a small piece left for a check, and. the following table gives the effect of use of soil from an old Alfalfa field spread over the land, just previous to sowing the seed: 2nd cutting Aug. 4 tons Ibs. 2 50 l 1050 1st cutting June 24 tons Ibs. Incoculated.......2 700 1900 3rd cutting Sept. 13 tons Ibs. 1 1050 1 800 Total yield for season tons Ibs. 5 1SOO 3 1750 Increase due to innoculatiou ir rr.igh.t-be well to call attention to the fact that an equally good stand was both" these plots, whether they were innoculated or noi. were: Pres. C. G. K. Nourse, C. F. P. P. W. Downer, G. M l-li-tch, U. Rylands, E. A. Cunning- ajtn. A. Tilley and W. Clark, the as- Distant secretary. The O. W. Kerr Co. head office con- firmed their offer to pay for the space used by the Board of Trade at Oma- ha. A resolution was passed thank- ing the company for their public spirited action. The Edmonton Board of wrote asking the Lethbridge Board of Trade to co-operate with them in combating the Lord's Day Alliance efforts to curtail the Sunday mail ser- vice. On motion of E. A. Cunning- ham and E. Rylands the Board of Trade decided to help the Edmonton Board in the matter. Mr. Magrath as member of parliament will be ask- ed to use his Influence to this end. Vice-President Whyte wrote saying that he had asked Supt. Taylor to re- port on the Gait street crossing and would act on that report. Wm. Whyte, vice-president of the C. P. R., in a letter to the Board re- garding the Lethbridge-Weyburn line evidently mistook the meaning of the Board's letter. He said that he found from consulting carefully prepared maps of the line to be traversed by that line that for seventy-five miles 'from the westerly end of the line' ;here were not more than seventeen thousand acres of cultivated land tri- butary to the line, and that therefore it would not be to build that section next summer. The Board asked for confirmation of the state- ment made by Mr. Whyte that the Lethbridge end would probably be started next year. As the figures obviously do not apply to the Lethbridge end, the Board will write again asking Mr. Whyte for the- firmation desired. Aid. Hatch brought up the matter of the agricultural society.. The sug- gestion was made that the secretary of the Board of Trade combine In his duties that of secretary of theAg ri- cultural Society. The Board passed a resolution to that effect which will be submitted to the Agricultural So- ciety meeting on Saturday night The efforts of C. A. Magrath, M.P., to get a better post office building were recognized by motion. Presi- dent Nourse expressed his regret that Hon. William Pugsley, minister of public works, had not seen fit to visit Lethbridge In the course of his western tour, to see the condition :hat exists here requiring a new pub- ic building. Messrs. Nourse, Cony- beare and Tilley were appointed to draft a resolution to be sent to Mr. Hon. Wm. Piijsley and Hon. R. Lemieux, .the postmaster gen- eral. An effort will be started to get a street mail delivery for the city. It s said that cities with ten thousand people are supposed to have this ser- vice, ,and the city council will receive suggestion that a census be taken to determine the population of the city. manner of contributing this assist- ance; THEREFORE be it resolved that the Legislature of Alberta memorial- ize the government of Canada that it Is the opinion of the people of the Province of Alberta as represented by the Legislature that a direct con- tribution of money to the Imperial Navy defence fund would, in the In- terests of the Empire la general and of Canada in particular, be the best way of rendering that assistance. On the suggestion of the premier, contrary to the ordinary procedure, this measure will come up for con- sideration at the next meeting of the parliament. At the conclusion of the sitting, Hon. W. A. Buchanan addressed the house, congratulating the members on the good start made and urging on them the necessity for thus equip- ping themselves to be of public ser- vice and to thus be intelligent voters. He emphasized the importance to young men of being able to properly express their ideas in public. A warm debate is looked for at the next meeting when the speech from the throne will be further debated for a short time and the navy f I 1 Mil I II H-I-H-I M H-H-H-H-1 II 1 i-H H H-l I I hi 11 It-Mi II-H tiou will be decided. The very nar- row majority of the government in the first division is an indication that they will have to use every precau- tion to preserve their power. Following is the speech from the throne in full as read to the house last night: MISTAKEN FOR A DEAR. AND WAS SHOT Rathwell, Man., Dec. fatal shooting accident occurred about ten miles north of Rathwell yesterday when William McCreary was mistak- en by John Smith for a deer, and was shot through the breast. Death was instantaneous. Smith was ac- companied by two of his brothers. They gotia rig and conveyed McCrea- ry's body to his home. John Smith at once came to "town and gave-him- self up to the local justice of the Jeace. Lots are now offered for sale in the townsite of Chin, owned jointly by the Canadian Pacific Rail- way and the Alberta Railway and Irrigation Co. For prices, terms, blue prints and all information call on THE GEORGE M. HATCH Land I 'M'-I I-H-H-I-i-H-l-H-fr. B. C. Fruit Wins Prizes London, Dec. Louise opened the Colonial fruit show at the Horticultural Hall yesterday. The following prize winners were an- nounced The Government oi British Columbia for'apples, a gold, medal; Xaslo district, silver and gilt Bank- sian medal; Salt Spr ng Island, sil- ver and gilt Kaightian medal; C. T. silver Knightian .medal; Sterling and Pitcairn, silver and gilt Banksian medal Mrs. J. Smith, sil- ver and gilt Banksian medal Okan- agan fruit, silver and gilt Knightian. medal; Victoria district, silver and gilt Knightian medal. Province oi New Brunswick, silver and gilt med- al; C. W. Peter, Queenstbwn, silver medal F. A. Hibbard, Burton, sil- ver medal; J. P. Belyea, Lower Gametown, silver meiial. On being asked why his province was1 not exhibiting, MajorrGeneral Howard, agent general for Nova Sco- tia, said "We are resting on our laurels" of 1908, whea we took sixteen via edals." Y. M. C. Has Interesting Debate The Mock Parliament of Y. M. held its initial meeting last night, when the acting lieutenan. governor, he Hon. W. A. Buchanan, read the peech from the throne to the assent- led members. R. P, Wallace, meni- er for Lethbridge District, was the .nanimous choice of the house for the ffice of speaker. The evening was fully occupied by i he debate on the speech from the iirone. The motion in the reply to he speech was given by the brilliant oung minister of public works, G. irtue. and seconded by the member or VermiUion. George Raley, The never enlarged on the speech, dwel- as the innoculation rarely effects the growth of the plants the first year. It usually appears the second season. When the last cutting was made little difference was noted in the color and general appearance of the two pieces and it is anticipated that the piece that is umnnoculated will --------_ t___ _ quite as good as the other next spring because the irrigation water win j the government anci was an have distributed the germs over the untreated' plot. advocate of the proposed liquor legis- Mixtures of Alfalfa and Grasses j lation. Where the Alfalfa is sown with a mixture of grasses such as Timothy.! The leader of the opposition. O. D. Grass etc. the hav can be cut only twice during the season instead! Austin, member of' ,ree times, owins to the fact that, the grasses are not ready to cut until some time in July, which only for one more cutting to come on.. while V.falfa grown alone, if three cuttings are desired.. ,must be cut about the of June. After the grasses had been cut in July they make little _ _ e. i i- e Alfalfa. The following table Total yield for season tons -Ibs. 3 growth so that the second cutting is gives the results of three plots: 1st cutting cutting July 19 Aug. T.O tons Ibs. tons Ibs. Alfalfa and anothy .1 1620 1 020 Alfalfa and Rye Grass ...........1 1800 I 1840 A.falfa. Timotny, Rye Grass .....1 1940 -40 Manuring Hay A.n to test the benefit of spreading a light mulch of coarse barnvard manure on hay was carried out. The manure was coarse., rather drv horse manure from the stable where considerable bedding was used rr to ill 540 1640 380 and was spread on in the month of November. 1908. gives the results obtained. Timothy, manured Timothy, no manure Brome Grass, manure Brome Grass, no manure Rye Grass, manure ............................Jj Rye Grass, no manure The following table on the increase in immigration n the past year and the proposed es- ablishment of an agricultural college. He defended the railway policy of or Calgary, moved m amendment a vote of want of con- fidence m the government. He spoke principally on the immigration qjies- tion, emphasizing the duty of the government to those of foreign birth I especially, not only to construct jails t ?f. and courthouses to secure their i peaceful behaviour, but to provide educational institutions and make an tons Ibs. 40 1200 440 0 40 320 FRANK Superintendent W. S. Foster oi the Carbon Hill Coal Company, and En- Winters who has been conduct- ing the railroad survey on the south fork for the Carbon Hill Company, came in the last of the week and left for Spokane, work having been dis- "continued for the, winter. The Tail- toad survey is in good shape for an early start of construction in the spring and people interest on the J South Fork arc of a sea- i son of activity next year. TELEGRAPHIC BRIEFS Alabama defeated a prohibition am- endment to the state constitution hy a majority ol to votes. Telegraph operators in relay offices, wire chiefs and manager on the chison, Topcka and Santa PC Rail- road, will receive an increase in cs of a month. attempt to elevate their ideals of citizenship. The amendment was seconded by D. R, Ware of the opposition, the member for Medicine Hat, who criti- cised the outlined measures of the government in regard to the aboli- tion of the licensed bar room and the establishment of an agricultural col- lege, suggesting alternative measures in each case. The member for Rocky Mountain District. G. Broadiey. the leader of the Independent party, joined with the opposition on the questions before the house, criticising the railroad policy and strongly opposing the pro- posed abolition of the bar room. The premier, R. R. Davidson, mem- ber for Strathcona, replied to the ar- guments submitted in opposition to the platform, dwelling on the bene- ficial work of the previous session, especially in railway construction, and outlining the provisions to some extent of the proposed liquor bill. The following resolution was in- troduced by the member for Medicine Hat, seconded by the member from Pembina, N. W. Allin: it is recognized by all true Canadians that it is the duty of Canada to assist in the naval defence of the British Empire, and WHEREAS the Parliament of Can- ada at Ottawa is considering the best 3- 21 I I I I I i I I I i Warmer Apparel For the Cold Wave New In Men's Wear Good Serviceable Tweed Suits, fall and winter, single and double breasted. Prices Special line of Blue Serge Suits, single and double breasted, well tailored. Prices. to Fit-Reform Tailor Made Suits. We have a large range of patterns to choose from. Every suit sold with our personal guarantee. to Men's Cloth Over- coats Prices to Any style you want in blue and black brown cloth and Tweeds. Furs Furs Men's Coon Coats, our special, worth our price IN MARVELLOUS VALUES FUR LINED COATS. Men's Fur Lined Coats, extra, quality, heaver shell, lined with quality Marmot, German Ot foliar: price Fur Lined Coats 3Ien's Rat Lined Coats, No. 1 beaver shell, No. 1 lining and otter collar, worth our Men's rat lined Overcoats, good quality shell and linings, Per- sian Lamb collar and lapels, i i I ter Men's Underwear AS WARM AS WOOL CAN MAKE IT. Ribbed wool underwear, regular price ......T5C, All wool fleece lined regular 65c. quality, price ........50c. Natural wool, regular SI.50, price. GIFTS FOR MEN Men's Burnt Leather Collar Boxes. Price .Men's Silk Neck Scarfs. Trices....................................................75c to Men's Quilted Neck Scarfs. Prices 75c to Men's Souvenir Silk Handkerchief's. Prices....................................50C, GOC and 75C Men's Fancy Silk Suspenders, put up in fancy cartons. Prices ......................00c to MEN'S NECKWEAR Irish Poplin Nt-ckwear, imported direct from Dublin. Prices......... 150 Doz. new neckwear in Derbys, Strings, Tucks, Bows, etc. Prices Linen Handkerchiefs, put up in fancy cartons, 1-2 doz. in box. Prices to .....25c to 60c to McKelvie McGuire Only Exclusive Men's Clothiers in Lethbridge ;