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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archives

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Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - August 14, 1974, Lethbridge, Alberta 38 THE LETHBRIDGE HERALD Wednesday, August 14, 1974 Lawrence Lamb M.D. Dear Dr. Lamb I have had cancel- of the thyroid. Radiation treatments shrank the growth and destroyed the cancer and my thyroid gland. I must take' thy- roid pills every day for the rest of my li'fe I've tried to form a routine so that I will not forget to take the pill. But things happen to up- set my routine, then I become confused and uncertain whether or not I have taken that pill. It this happens, would it be better for me to take it and possibly unknowingly take two or would it be better to let it pass and possibly miss a day? What might the reaction be9 My doctor said the effects of the medication do not show up tor 10 days, but this didn't answer my question. I have not been aware of any results ot the medication, but being told I must have it. I have tried to be faithful about taking it. I'm 57 and slightly overweight, which I have been all my life. Dear Reader Anyone who has to take pills regularly will be familiar with your problem Taking the pili will become so automatic that you forget whether you took 'the blamed thing or not. There is a solution for everyone for this problem. Just sit down with a stack of .'il envelopes, any size you like, and number the days of the month on them. Then put the right pill or pills in each envelope for the month. Each day take your pill out of the right envelope. Then if you can't remember on the 19th of Julv whether you took your pill that morning or not, just look in the number 19 envelope. If it is still there you had hotter take it. If "the envelope is empty you have had it. You'd be sur- prised how many people can profit with this simple method It eliminates all the contusion. The thyroid medicine you are taking is long acting so if you happen to miss one pill it won't be a disaster. The etlects are leveled out over a period of 10 days or more. If you miss an occasional pill or take an extra one it won't make much difference But, tor proper balance you will need to be careful not to miss too many days or take too many extras. Why not try the envelope method and be safe and sure And, you do need to keep on taking that thyroid. Without it you will become lethargic, have skin changes, and a host of problems related to being low on thyroid. Your horoscope By Jeane Oixon Dear Dr. Lamb What is your opinion of potassium supplements? I understand potassium chloride is poison. My husband has- orders to take it twice a day. He has had two heart attacks and heart tailure and a stroke. The stroke left him with some speech problems only. Dear Header Potassium chloride is certainly not poison. It is very similar to table salt (sodium Our body cells contain lots of potassium as the main type of salt inside our cells. They also contain some chloride. Without adequate amounts of potassium in the cells they can't function properly. Potassium in one form or another is often given to heart patients, particularly if they are taking any of the digitalis medicines for heart failure. It is also used to help prevent heart irregularities. Sned your questions to Dr. Lamb, in care of this new- spaper, P.O. Box 1551. Radio City Station, New York, N.Y. 10019. For a copy of Dr. Lamb's booklet on spastic colon, send 50 cents to the same address and ask for "Spastic Colon" booklet. Fun with figures By J. A. H. HUNTER THURSDAY, AUGUST 15 Your birthday today: This year you make practical use of latent resources. Almost any activity yields benefits if appropriately directed. The latter part of the year is taken up with pragmatic develop- ment of what you've ac- culuated. Relationships are important, but change slightly. Today's natives have vivid imaginations, prefer oc- cupations in which talk is im- portant. ARIES (March 21-Aprii Concentrate on what you have to do at work. Stay'clear of minor clashes by restraining inpulses. Your intuition is working overtime listen to it' TAURUS (April 20 May Almost anything serves as focus for conflict. If you can ride out a whim to change, you achieve rather good results. Matters at home reach a turning point tonight. GEMINI (May 21-June Your money has proverbial wings today. Invitations and suggestions from all sides egg you on to squander it. Finish what you've started before getting into new ventures. CANCER (June 21-JuIy There's no natural law that says you have the last word in family arrangements. You may change your tune when you hear the latest. Be easy on everybody. LEO (July 23-Aug Im- portant changes need further study; routines take a little more determination. It's a moderate day of normal progress, all areas near balance. VIRGO (Aug 23-Sept This is a day for economy. Spend where you must in order to have its full benefit, but avoid overdoing or going into speculative or uncertain enterprises. LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct It is doubtful that anybody will do exactly as you say, for the moment, so keep everything to basic facts. Leave people free to make up their own minds. SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov Being erratic and having to make sudden decisions aren't the same thing, although they may seem so. Think first, then go ahead Keep to a minimum encounters with extremists or specialists. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22-Dec It's better to go it alone, but don't upset friends by the manner in which you turn them down. Late hours find you off on another tack altogether, having fun. CAPRICORN (Dec 22-Jan Letting well enough alone is a fine art now. Even minor changes have an impact on future working conditions. Do what you've promised without quibbling. Home life is what you make it. AQUARIUS (Jan 20-Feb No wild impulses today! Be methodical, carry on with accepted plans, complete routines. Slow down so you overlook nothing later. Travel of any sort is not favored. PISCES Group resources are subject to confusing application. Be sure everybody understands' what's going on before you contribute your share. Details of daily chores emphasized. MOuJ OWlD I' r A NEu) SOFTLY ANP SHUT UP'" AND CARM A BEAoLE" IF THE NOW THATS WHAT 1 HI AND LOIS I PON'T THINK YOU CAN SWIM TDPAY, THE WATER IS TOO CAN WE OUT WHERE IT'S SMOOTH? BUGS BUNNY We have 2279 for the game today. Two 2's. one 7, and one 9. I'sing all four each time, but no other digits at all, you form expressions for the consecutive numbers from one up. Ar.y arithmetical signs may- be used, but no summation or factorial symbols. Don't forget decimals, regular and repeater, also roots and powers mo extra For example, 72 minus nine plus two is a solution for 65. The limit without a break in continuity seems to be 108. I shall be glad to check solutions, and will send hints to help in future games if re- quested. Yesterday's answer: LOSS was 1577. Ask Andy Goren on Bridge BY CHARLES H. GORES c Th. ChicMo TriDun. Roth vulnerable. South deals. NORTH 4A Q 5 4 10 2 A J 9 8 7 WEST EAST A J 10 98 73 A 2 FOOD Andy sends a complete 20- yolume set of the Merit Students Encyclopedia to Donna Dyke, age 14, of Kings Mountain. North Carolina, for her question: Which foods have proteins? A proper diet is a balanced assortment of fats, car- bohydrates and proteins, plus various vitamins and minerals. Proteins are our most important foods because they can take over some of the work done by fats and car- bohydrates. Besides, every living cell must have its quota of different proteins to stay healthy. For this reason, it is wise to know all we can about proteins. East 2V Pass Pass SOUTH 6 A K 7 6 4 10 6 2 The bidding: South West North 1 Pass 2 3 4 Pass 3 4 3 NT Pass Pass Opening lead: Queen of It sound defensive tech- nique to force declarer to win tricks before he wants to. This type of play occurs frequently when dummy has a long suit and the defenders refuse to allow declarer to duck a round of the suit. When the long suit IP in i he closed hand, the r-.i-.-f-'" defense is far more fLfi'.cuit to find. South had a difficult rebid problem. His hand was too strong to permit him to pass, so he compromised by raising partners suit. After North showed spade values, South decided that three no trump was the best chance of game. Li'L ABNER West led the queen of hearts. Declarer allowed the defenders to win the first two heart tricks, holding up the ace until the third round. The contract was not a happy one. To have any chance of success, declarer would have to find a 3-3 diamond split and be able to duck an early diamond trick to West. In addition, communications between de- clarer's hand and dummy were a problem. If South crossed to dummy with a low spade to the queen to lead a diamond, West could win the diamond and return a club, forcing declarer to rise with dummy's ace and remove the entry to the ace of spades. Declarer therefore decided to cash the king of spades before leading a spade to dummy's queen. Now. he led a low diamond. East was Paul Lukacs, who has represented Israel in world bridge com- petition and is a renowned problem composer. He rose to the occasion by inserting his queen of diamonds! This brilliant stroke left declarer with no play for his contract. He could not allow East to hold the trick, for the defender had three hearts to cash. South had to win the trick, and even though he could set up his diamonds, he could not get back to his hand to enjoy the two extra tricks developed. The list of protein-rich foods includes meat and dairy products, eggs and fish. This sounds simple enough, but there is nothing simple about the way in which the body uses the proteins available foods. For example, it would seem logical for the digestive system to separate the proteins in. say, a piece of cheese, and put them to work right away. But this does not happen. Actually, proteins are large molecules built up from small units called amino acids. And each cell insists on building the particular proteins it happens to need from these basic ingredients. For this reason, when protein-rich loods are eaten, the digestive system breaks the big protein molecules apart. From this process, supplies of assorted amino acids are circulated around to the living cells. The in the cell nucleus directs the assembling of the amino acids to rebuild the amino acids into the required proteins. These may or may not reassemble the proteins you ate for dinner. Amino acids are small molecule packages made from atoms of carbon and hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen. Most of them also contain atoms of sulphur. So far. more than 60 different amino acids have been found in living cells of the plant and animal kingdoms. But only about 20 of them are used by living cells to build proteins. A protein molecule is a polymer, a long chain of basic units strung together. Its shape is either a coil or a straight string. Here and there, long chains are linked to form a web of tough protein material. The smallest pro- tein molecules contain perhaps 40 amino acid units. Large ones contain many hundreds, including a number of different amino acids. Some of the amino acids we need to model our needed proteins can be manufactured in the liver and in other parts of the body. These are called the .lonessential amino acids because we don't have to take them from our foods. The so- called essential amino acids are the ones that the human body cannot manufacture for itself These we must get from either plants or animals. Plant foods contain a large variety of proteins but their proteins tend to lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Unless all of these are included, the human body can- not use them to build its own proteins. For this reason, when we serve soybeans and other protein rich plant food, it is wise to include a cheesy dairy product, a little meat or some other animal food. Questions asked by chil- dren of Herald readers should be mailed to Ask Andy, P.O. Box. 765, Huntington Beach, California 92648. (Copyright Chronicle Publishing Co. 1973) HE'S FINISHED EATING THAT APPLE NOW MAYBE I CAN WATCH DAISY WONDER HE ALWAVS SO FAR? FETCH THIS BALL ARCHIE WITH THESE PRICES, YOU SHOULD HAVE GOT AN ARMED GUARD.' CHICKEN FISH, LIVER... wow.' THAT WAS A GOOD TRADE! IF YOU LIKE CAT FOOD JUGHEAD CARRIED MY BAG OUT OF THE SUPER- HAGAR THE HORRIBLE MERE'S A SHOULD LOT ABOUT YOU i WHAT j A I ME SUCH1 A REP Flashback By THE CANADIAN PRESS Aug. 14, 1974 Japan unconditionally accepted the Allies' terms 29 years ago today in 1945 bringing an end to the Second World War. Surrender terms were officially signed aboard the American battleship Missouri on Sept. 1. 1814 The American gar- rison at Fort Erie repulsed a British night attack. BEETLE BAILEY ON, ALWAYS ROOM FOR ONE MORE WANT A RIPE, LT. FLAP? OLD CROWD SHOULD SEE ME NOW fc: YOU WAVE A FULL LOAD NOW YOU RE THE WORLD'S MOST EXPENSIVE PSYCHIATRIST n- so CURE ME OF PHOBIA fr I OONT KNOW WHY I'M AFRAID OF 'EM BUT I SEEM TO SEE THEM TUMBLEWEEDS I SEE ONE NOW, RIGHT BEHIND VOU YOU ARE A NUT, CHIEFY-WEEFYi MY NAME IS HILPEGARP INGOING TO PE YOUR CAPTIVE FOR A FEW 0M5J NOW, PON'T YOU PARE MAKE A FUSS OVER MEJ JUST 60 ON APOUT YOUR tORE ANP I'LL- AS QUIET ASAMOUSYJ... I'P LIKE 10 FRESHEN UP NOW, HON WILL YOU HAVE A PELLPOY SHOIV ME TO MYTEEWAM OR OR WHAT- EVER IT IS YOU CALL THESE WRUNG LITTLE RDINTEP THINGS YOU LIVE IN? ;