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Charleston Daily Mail (Newspaper) - April 29, 1934, Charleston, West Virginia SUNDAY MORNING MORGENTHAU IS HIT BY PRIEST Attack Follows Notice of Silver Holdings by Radio League . ______ ! DETROIT. April 28    (UP).—Rev. j Charles E. Coughlin today defended j the purchase of the Radio League of j the Little Flower of 500.000 ounces of silver and issued a broadside against Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau. Jr, “the international bankers of ill repute,” and “holders of bloody Liberty bonds.” Rev. Mr. Coughlin’s statement as- I sailing Mr. Morgenthau said, “Henry j Morgenthau, Jr., secretary of the j treasury has completed his clumsy I effort to protect gold advocates, the j federal reserve bankers and the in- | ternational bankers of ill-reputc. “It terminated in a disastrous raid on prices of cotton, wheat, silver and other commodities. Wheat declined 32 cents a bushel; cotton dropped 125 I points and confidence in the Presi- i dent's recovery program was! dimmed.” The purchase of silver was made on the word of President Roosevelt j that commodity prices would be re- j stored to 1926* levels, according to I the statement. Father Coughlin said, “This silver j Investigation smells to high heaven insofar as it is a dead herring smeared across the path of monetary reform. It definitely places Morgenthau. on the side of the international ! gold bankers to whom the word silver j is anathema.” lf Mr. Morgenthau ; were sagacious, according to Father Coughlin's statement, he would have j investigated the holders of approxi- I irately 20 billion dollars in Liberty bonds. “If he were astute.” Mr. Coughlin I said, “he would have investigated profiteers in gold transactions Through our process of revaluation ♦ APRIL 2!>. 1231 In Pursuit of the Elusive Dillingei Death narrowly missed the bandit occupants of this bullet-scarred coupe before they abandoned it in South St. Paul, Minn., in the flight of the Dillinger gang after a battle with officers in northern Wisconsin. A policeman is shown pointing to the rear window, shattered by a bullet, with another bullet hole shown in the body, indicated by an arrow. Inside ledge of the car was bloodstained. Speaking of Politics Nation, State, Countv and City T has been making a statewide canvass seeking support for the Democratic senate nomination, largely on the ground that he resides in the southern end of the state. J. H. Long. Huntington newspaper of world control and interna- Isors of the club have extended a wel- publisher. ; HE V. O. P. Republican club, meeting at the county com t house Friday night, had no direct connection with the regular we multiplied the gold in the hands of Republican organization, though “reg-the internationalists, the financial Dil- ular” Republicans were invited. Spon- lingers tionalism. “Morgenthau, testifiyng before the sub-committee of the committee on banking and currency on March I, 1934 intimated that he would be glad to use silver only if the nation went into another tailspin. Thereby inferring that the stranglehold of gold would be broken only to avoid utter destruction. In the meantime, with trade halting, with ten million unemployed. with currency money becoming less and less each week, the Secretary of the Treasury is championing the philosophy of the international bankers.” Fr. Coughlin asked, “if the silver investigation were half honest in its completeness, why did it not list the names of those who are interested financially in silver mines and silver contracts. Opposition Reaffirmed WASHINGTON, April 28 (UP).— The administration’s position on the Silver question remains unchanged d -spite reports to the contrary, the White House said today. Mr. Roosevelt's attitude was reaffirmed and was explained as being that until other nations join with the United States in a full determination of the question, this country would not act. At the same time it was said the President was standing by the proposed agreement overed at the London economic conference for a silver reserve 25 per cent of the gold reserve and not exceeding in any case 30 per cent. The White House, furthermore, explained that no negotiations were in progress on the silver situation. Woman Financier Is Reported Slain SEATTLE. Wash.. April 28 (UP).— Mrs. Sarah Smith Scollard. one of the richest women in the Pacific Northwest, who has been sought for two years, has been slain. Mayor John F. Dore. of Seattle, said he was informed today. The mayor said the information came from a man who asked him for $200,000 to “reveal Mrs. ScolJard's grave.” Dore refused to name the informant. Mrs. Scollard was owner of an estate estimated at between $5 000.000 and $15,000,000. She was known to carry as much as $500,000 in a suitcase with her at times. “A great many people have suspected for a long time that Mrs. Scollard was murdered.” Dore said. “If this could be proved and her body found, it would aid in settling her estate.” She inherited several million from her first husband. George Smith who made a fortune in the Calumet-Hecla mine at Wallace. Idaho. She made several millions in real estate in Chicago and returned to Seattle in 1926. She was said to bo carrying $2,000,000 in liberty bonds in suit cases and an additional $880.-000 inside her dress when she went to her home on Lake Whatcomb. near Bellingham. After she married Francis Scollard! they went to South America and later raced back to Bellingham on .separate , boats. The $880,000 was said to have ! been left in a trunk at the Lake : Whatcomb home, but when Mrs. Scol- I lard arrived, it was missing. The ScolJards were in divorce court later and in lengthy litigation over the Scollard fortune. Subsequently a caretaker, sleeping in the basement of the Lake What-comb home, pulled out an extra blanket in the dark to put on his bed. The next morning he found his bed covered with SI.OOO bills. The blanket had contained a hidden hoard of $360,000 of the missing money, which was turned over to Mrs. Scollard. According to government agents, Mrs. Scollard last was seen alive in Los Angeles. Before leaving Seattle she drew $500,000 in currency from a Seattle bank, which .she placed in a handbag, government agents said. A. E. Haan, secretary of the Republican state committee said Saturday that the organization will hold its first meeting of the campaign in about two weeks. At the proper time, lie said. he would announce the date and place. To this meeting, he said, ail county Republican chairmen, as well as state committee members, would be invited, and that it would be for the purpose of organizing for the campaign. Some of the old line Republican leaders, men who have held high state ; positions, are looking at the V. O. P. movement and at the so-called Republican organization crowd, with a sort of wonderment. Obviously, they cannot see clearly a way to meet tho uncertain situation. All of them would respond quickly enough to join a light : if this was a genera! election yea:* and if the prize was the state admin stra-lion. for the feeling is that there could be found many issues for waging a campaign against the state Democrat" But. at present, they admit the popularity of President Roosevelt’s administration is great enough to make it risky for Republicans to go into the campaign on national issues, though this situation may change soon. Some feel, that, if the President’s .strength lasts until next fall, it will be sufficient to aid materially Democratic candidates for congress, and. except where local, state or personal issues are involved, the Democrats will hold an advantage. Wast Virginia still is a Republican state and the Democrats won in 1932 on a landslide. It is admitted now that there has been a faliing-away of Democratic strength, though it is doubtful if it has been large enough to give to Mr. mg Koontz wi if he enter, the ive strong race. back- Ccm met: rent issue State Sen: Ville upon says 'the decision didate was not re of mel. his cot "-111 the bd. centon? e importuning^ ct respectable element of tho par claim to see in Mr. Taylor, who ha" been tried and tested crucible of politics and who ha everv nf ii ide, illy and .service pie. Mr. Taylor sa “no disparaging the candidacies men who have enter the race for which only one can He expressed coni both in the primary tion next November rer rho he had d fur word to utter against of the other splendid entered or who may for the have.” donee and i tory. elec- Ui da the Republican leader.' ance of victory. [.heir old assur- circics iepre-candi-ucceed Poca Ili<rli Seniors To Offer Play on Friday • *' The senior class oi Poca. high school will present “Baby Step- Out.” a three-act comedy by C. L. Faddy, in the high school auditorium next Friday evening at 8 o'clock. “Baby Steps Out” is the story of an American family of which Baby is the younger daughter. Members of the cast are Thalia Ice. Pauline Williams, Lohan Casio. Hildreth Cain, Dewey Crago, Virginia Asbury. Tressa Hem, Eva Kyle and Jesse Brown. The annual junior-senior banquet of • Poca high school was held Friday j with the following taking part in a program for the evening: John Am-bier, Alma Lloyd, Pauline William". Romaine Carney, and Walter J. P.-Id)-.    rn    I The Republicans fee! that their be. t '-chance this fall will be to elect a majority to the house of delegates. They ; say there are enough Democratic mistakes to give them a landslide, and, the i only reason they would not capture the i state .senate at the same time, is that too many of the Democratic majority in that body are holdovers. They are willing to wait for the general election of 1936 when they hope to capture, not only the legislature, but "he | state government and a1! the congressional districts. Much uneasiness prevail" among Republicans over the United States .senatorship race this year. Senator II. D Hatfield, who is expected to be a candidate for the nomination to succeed himself, is sa id to feel keenly the risk of being a candidate and some of those who claim to have been close to him recently, are saying that he would prefer staying out of the contest, and even yet, may decide to withdraw. However, Senator Hatfield has made no statement. Several feelers for other prospective Republican senate candidates have been put out since March I and all of them are said to have fallen f at. because none of the proposed candidates wanted to make the race this year. They are willing to leave it to Senator Hatfield, and have indorsed him. A new situation has developed in the Democratic senatorial race to har-rass Senator M. M. Neely, and former Senator W. E. Chilton, and several others who has been mentioned as can- j didates. The new development is the I formal announcement of J. Alfred Taylor, of Fayetteville, that he is a I candidate for the senate honors. It is reported that Mr. Chilton greeted the news of Mr. Taylor’s announce-ment with displeasure and Senators Neely, it is said. will now be forced to revise his plans to have his organ-; zation dictate the nomination. While there bas been some doubt as to whether Mr. Chilton would be • a candidate, many persons claimed it j was clear to them that the former j senator wanted to name the candidate ; and felt powerful enough to do it, I though some Democratic leaders! scoffed at the idea of his dominance. I At any rate. Mr. Chilton was under- j stood to be having much fun over the way certain Democrats would tell the .state they would not run "if Chilton does.” and, unexpectedly, Mr. Taylor’s formal announcement carne along and knocked the unctuousness said    to be seriously coming hand to    all “good” Republic-    ’i0°king over the    situation and in ans. They want    party unity    and they    some quarters it is    believed that, Sena- wan t to back the best men    they can    *or ^eCi-v may shift to him his full find in the coming campaign. NEW DEAL ACTS, TUGWELL SAYS Last Two Administrations Talked Only, Asserts Roosevelt^ Aide BUFFALO, N. Y., April 28 (UP).— The New Deal will build an "economy of abundance” for the American people, if it is not thwarted in its efforts by selfish interests, Dr. Rex G. Tugwell. assistant secretary of agriculture and member of the Roosevelt Brain Trust declared here tonight. Characterizing the Roosevelt administration as .seeking to bring order from chaos, the professor, here to address a group of western New York bankers, denounced critics of the national government, who “have sought to condemn all those efforts by the mere use of such words as collectivism and regimentation.” “The administration’s programs.” he said, "are based on the time-tried principles of American Democracy, upon the self-government and .selfdiscipline of county and local associations and upon voluntary cooperation on a grand scale.” Terming the agricultural adjustment act as the “cornerstone of national recovery.” Dr. Tugwell declared that the “3.000.000 farmers voluntarily participating in the adjustment plans are not complaining about regimentation.” "This cry is "coming rather from those, who, during the years when farmers by the thousands were losing then* homes, congratulated them on then* rugged individualism, and now that they have succeeded in retaining their homes, commiserate them on losing their traditional American ways.” The Brain Truster told the bankers that banking and agriculture in this country were “interdependent,” and that the former could not become stabilized without a return of purchasing power and stability to the latter. He traced the fall in farm income from 1929 to 1932. and showed that STOCKS B USINESS-i-MARKETS PRICES EASE ON DULL EXCHANGE Motor Issues ain! Utilities Drop Sharply; Interest Is at Lowest Ebb New York Stock Exchange List By WINTHROP, MITCHELL. A- CO._ support. Observers say that Senator Neely will find it embarrassing to oppose Mr. Taylor for the senate nomination. It is pointed out that he opposed Mr. Taylor for speaker of the house of delegates in 1931 and after getting his hands burned he left Charleston quickly and has not since meddled with the Fayette county statesman. Arthur B. Koontz, of Charleston, Democratic nominee for governor in 1920. is still said to be considering announcing for the senate nomination. when farmers’ purchasing power had decreased $7,000,000 OOO over the 3-year period it had "the same effects upon outlying banks as if a large part of the people had vanished.” climaxing in the collapse of the banking system in March. 1933. The main difference between the Coolidge-Hoovei* and Roosevelt administrations is the difference between talk and action, the professor claimed. In so far as surplus control is concerned, Dr Tugwell said. the President and Secretary of Agriculture Wallace merely have followed NEW YORK. April 28    (UP).— ; Stocks receded today despite firmness in commodities and favorable business ; news. Losses were small in most instances and volume continued light, j There was a sharp rise in wheat on | the Chicago board of trade. Near the I close of the stock market, wheat was I up more than a cent a bushel. Other : grains were up fractionally. Cotton. | silver, rubber, hides firmed, while tin I futures declined. The dollar was (mixed in a narrow range. The stock market lacked leadership. McLellan stores was the most active issue, holding around its previous close of 4 3-8. Schenley was active at ja gain of nearly a point, while relatively heavy declines were noted in | Consolidated Gas. Hudson Motors, Radio corporation. United Drug, In-ternational Nickel. United States I Rubber and General Motors A gradual easing off in prices oc-| curred near the close. Motors weak-; en od with Hudson down more than a j point. Rails lost early gains. IJ t i IJ -{ties held barely steady. Mining is-! sues were mixed. Chemicals declined as did steels, oils and stores shares. Industrial Rayon equaled its low. Interest in the market was at a low ; ebb. Many traders withdrew* pend-| ing discussions on the stock exchange I bill scheduled to start in the house on Monday. Indications that automobile business was approaching its peak , for the spring led some to unload the ' shares. Storks receded further this week in dull trading as the nation’s leading industries reported increased operations. and the dollar regained losses incurred a week ago The principal reason for the steel-: 'market uncertainty was distinct weakness in a number of commodities. The traders became convinced that nothing would be done for silver at this session of congress and many sold their holdings Without: silver > legislation, it was thought there would be no further inflation. BORTON. WOOL April 28 rn. the adv OHS ice of the with actu previous admin editorially in the curios newspaper, The published at Ba vette-candidacy. Mr. Taylor to become ched oven Italy Hakes Plans And Arms for \\ ar drift: *1 ll! - along more or less aimless , I I Ii With Vol!! is unusually proloi tic wool selling to r es tab dish ma rket values, and will; clip i offered at Jess than Boston p for < )!d woo is. it is hardly surpl I h a t, refine.' us develops in ti < a ca right. It a re-i very y w ho i man in the * stood courage to to the peo- ROM F. Apr tor Emma nuc ability of the their place it: rommel ii 28 'UP* I III. pro* Italian pc the sun i Kl! Vi IC- la snung the ipie to keep conomically, iallv and bv the force of anre italian pa: me n to- Fe the of guild i tic ult ion nf prised.” he form a part i, from the niversities. o of peace our armed s assumed in ] ll six of the Democratic ices in congress will be for nominations to themselves. Only one, so far, has formally announced his candidacy. He is Robert L. Ramsey, of Follansbee. Mr. Ramsey expects to have a hard fight, if he meets as his Republican opponent former Representative Carl (’. Bachman, of Wheeling, whom he defeated in 1932. What the Republicans expected to do about placing candidates for congress in the field has not yet become apparent. W. Chapman Revercomb. of Charleston, has been mentioned as a possible candidate for the nomination , for congress from the Sixth district. i Joe L. Smith, the Democratic incumbent. in all probability, will be the Democratic nominee. It has been hinted that if he ss the nominee, that ; his tote to override the President’s veto of the soldier compensation bill. ■ may be made an issue. L. O. Curtis, of Spencer, formerly • chief clerk in the state auditor’s office. has announced as a candidate for the Republican nomination to the st ate senate from the fourth district. He will seek the seat from which W. O. Wcissenburger, of Point Pleasant will retire at the end of this year. Under the plan of rotation. Mr. Cur- j tis says it is Roane county’s turn to j elect a .senator this year. The fourth district also will elect a senator for a short term this fall, as a successor to the seat now held by ; Mrs. Hazel Yeager Hyre, must be J elected to fill out the unexpired term j of her husband, Kcnna K. Hyre, who died early this year. Mrs. Hyre was ; appointed to tho senate by Governor Rump after her husband’s death but the appointment is good only until I a candidate for the Democratic nomi- ! the next regular election. Mrs. Hyre ; has not indicated whether she will be nation for the short term to succeed -herself. The fourth district is made up of ' Roane, Jackson and Mason counties. I Mr. Curtis formerly was circuit I clerk in Roane county*. He served for I 12 years as chief clerk rn the state auditor's office. He retired from that position on March 15, 1933 and has resided since at Spencer, his old home. Mr. Curtis wull make an active campaign for the senate. de' >r opened the 29ti day. It re av be the Ii : legislature before th be transformed into a sys gov cr nm cot The king argued that must have adequate deft best assurance of peace “No one should be sa said. “if military .subjects of our scholastic curricul secondary schools to the i "The strongest gnat ant lies in the efficiency forces.” He emphasized Italy peace when he said: "The Italian foreign policy is one of frank, concrete, peaceful collaboration with neighbors, and those upon whom the development and future of occidental civilization rests ” “Our internal policy,” he continued. “is based on the rule of authority, order and justice, guaranteed by the political and military forces of the regime,” Regarding the financial situation, he said: "With the balancing of the budget are bound the destinies of public and private finance, which are now based and must be based on fidelity to the gold standard.” Splendor and ceremony marked the occasion as the king read his address from the throne to the deputies. 14(5 of whom are making their first appearance in parliament. Premier Benito Mussolini and his ministers greeted the king at the foot of the throne. It was noticeable that for the first time, when reading the oath of the deputies to the king. Mussolini omitted tho words “and his royal successors.” Baptists of Valiev Near Session End Rev. John R. Wolfe and Rev. Will McCurdy were the speakers Saturday evening before the Kanawha Valley Baptist association’s "fifth Sunday” session al the Oakwood Baptist church in the South Hills. Speakers at the morning and afternoon session included John Starches Rev. C. B. Jackson, Rev. James F. Frame. Rev. William Bricen Miller and Rev. W. C. Herold. Sunday’s services will bo conducted by Rev. J. E. Hartman, of Marmet; Rev. Virgil Cavender, of Charleston; Rev. J. E. Myers, of St. Albans; Rev. Frank Robertson, of Spring Hill; Rev. Bruce Cooper and Rev. C. H. Harrison. all taking part. st met u re. Ye; woo! is not as evidenced bv secure cooees it from most of houses. Quotations: Oh ing 33-35 cent" 35; three-eight !, 35-3' staple Wool ■ iv in mud. •cal Iv using price oak as is talked, ne of efforts to of consequence reliable Boston ie comb le r i) i amaine g reuse; h a lf b !< >od. 34 - territory graded tine combing. 84-86. half blood. 81-83; three-eighths 5-80; quat* CHAIN CHICAGO, A; WHEAT - Mav .......... .] illy Sep)ember .... COHN - Mav . ..... G); -73 So Mi JU St' menus OATS 41) RYF ) ber 29 COMMODITY INDEX NKW YORK. April 28 (UP). Dun A- Bradstreet daily weighted price index <>f 30 basic commodities: Today 105.52 Yesterday 105.00 Week ago 105 55 Month ufo 107 27 Year ago 81.58 1934 high (March 12) 110.24 1934 low (January 3> 101.05. High Low Close Adams Express ..... .. 9 J 9% 9% Air Reduction . ...... . IOU 100‘s 100% Allied Chemical ...... .146 146 146 Alaska Juneau ....... . 20 1 e 20 20 Allis Chalmers . 19*’H 19% 19% I Allegh. Corp. ..... AlJegli. Cor]) Pfd. ... .. ll1 4 3% 3% . IAU 15% 15% I Amu. Bank Note ..... . 24 1 4 22 ’ 4 22% ; Amu. Can ...... ... . 102 101% 101% I Amu, Car & Fdy. ... . 27 J 27 27 I Amu. & Fgn. Power . . . 9*4 “o% 9% Amn. Interim........ 8 *4 8% 8% A nm. Loco........... . 31% 31% 31% Amu. P. & L...... . BJ 8% 8% ; Amn. Radiator ...... . la J 15* a 15% Amn. Rolling Mills . .. . 23 *4 23 1 a 23% I Amn. Safety Razor . . 541 a 54'a 54% Amn. Smelters ....... . 42'4 41 % 41% I Amn. Steel Fdy...... . 191 a 19% 19 % Ainu. Sugar . . ..... . 49 48'4 49 i Amn. Tri. & Tel..... . 120% 120 120‘s I Amn. Tub. *‘B ’ ____ . 71 J 71% 71% Amn. Tub. Pfd...... 123 123 123 Amn. Water Works ... ! 21 20 20% Amn. Woolen ........ . 13 >4 13% 12% I Amn. Woolen, Pfd. ... . 73 73 73 I Anaconda ........... . 36% 16% 16'« Atchison .... ........ . 68 J 67 ‘4 67 i I A. C. I.............. . 46 46 46 ! Ail. Refg ........... . 28 J 27% 27% J Armour ‘A" ......... 07k 6 ' 4 6 % Auburn Auto . 4!’4 41 41 Aviation Corp........ . 8 71 a 7% J Bristol - Myers ...... . 36 35' 2 35% i Baldwin Loco........ . 13% 13% 18% I Ballo. ic Ohio...... . 28 ‘ 4 28- a 28% I Boite. <Y Ohio, Pfd. .. . 32' 4 31% 31% j Balushai "A” ......... . 8% 8% 8% i Benchx .............. . 18 *8 18 18 : Best <Y Co........... . 32% 32% 32% i Beth. Steel ........... . 411 i 40' 4 40’4 | Beth. Steel Pfd...... . 75 75 75 Bohr. Aluminum ...... 64' 4 63 63 Bordens ... ........ 25 * 24’4 24% Borg Warner ........ .' 24% 24% 24% Brooklyn Union Gas . . 68% 68’2 68% I Brooklyn Manhattan . . 377 « 37 37 I Brigg-. Bqdv ........ 18' 2 17% 17% i A. JVI. Byers Co....... . 26% 26% 26 % ; Burr. Add. Mach...... . 15 ' a 15% 15% i Canada Dry ........ . 28' 2 27 ’• 4 27 % I Canadian Pacific ...... . 16*2 16' 4 16% Case Threshing ....... . 68 n 68% 68 ' 4 j Caterpillar Tractor .... . 32 31 % 31% Cerro de Pasco ....... . 34% 34 34 i Chesapeake Corp’n ... . 46'4 461 « 4614 files. <Sc Ohio ...... . 47 46' 4 46' 4 I Chrysler ............ . 50 48' a 48% IC. M, & St. P Pi*. .. . 10% 10% 10% iC. R. I. X- Pac....... . 4' 4 4% 4% Gilgo. ic N. W........ . 12% 12% 12 % Coca Cola ............ .123>4 122% 122% Col.-Palm.-Peet ....... . 17 16% 17 Col. Carbon .. ........ . 73 72 72% I Col. Gas ............. * 1?’? 15 15 Common A- Son...... 2% 2% 2% Con sole urn ............ . 28 28 28 Comm. Credit ........ . 33% 33% 331 > Comm. Solvents ...... . 27'4 26% 26% Cons. Gas ............. . 36% 35 1 » 36 Cons. Oil Corp....... . 3 2% 12% 12% i Cont). Can ........... . 82 81 % 81 % Cohtl. Insurance ...... . 34 34 34 Cont!. Motors %........ . 1% 1% 1% Cont]. Oil ... ....... . 21% 21 21 Corn Prod........... . 73'« 73 73 ! Corn Prod Pfd...... . 143% 143% 143% Cudayh. Packing ....... . 47’ 4 47s* 47 4 Curtis Pub. Co....... 27 26 % 261 Curtiss Wright ....... ~4% 4 4' a Curtiss Wright “A" . 10% 10% 10% Del.. Lack, ic Wes. ... 271 j 27 27% Detroit Edison ........ 82% 81 81 I Diamond Mate!', ...... . 24% 24% 24' a Douglass Aircraft ...... . 23! 4 22% 2*1% I Dupont ................ . 95% 93% 94 Eastman Kodak ....... . 95% 95 95 Flee. Battery ......... . 45 45 45 Elco Ardo Lite ....... . 25 7 8 25% 25' a Fief. P & I............ • 7' a 6% 67 a L' v, ,-1 ’ . » t 2218 OIS, r.. ic (<...<^ . ....... • * *. -1 4 — 1 4 Fidelity Phoenix ...... . 32 % 321 321 2 Firestone Rubber ..... 21 ! j. 21 ■ 4 21% First Nat. Stores ..... . 66% 66' 2 66% : Foster Wheeler ....... . 19 19 19 Fourth Nat. Investors . . 23% 23 4 23% Freeport ............... 44% 44% 44% Fox Film . ..... 16% 16 % 16% Gen. Anni. Tank Car . . 40'2 40% 40% Gen. Asphalt....... . 21% 21% 21% Cf ... Baking ......... . 12 ! 8 12 12% Gen Electric ........ 2'x 221 a 22% General Foods ........ 3618 36 36 Gen, Motors ........ 37% 36% 367 a Gen Motors, Pfd..... 102! > 102 102% Gillette ..... ......... ll % 11% 11% Gold Dust ............ 21 % ZP 2 21'. * I Goodrich .............. 16% 16 16 Goodyear .. ........... 36 a 34% 34% G’an by Cooper ....... IPR IPs IPs I Graham Paige ........ 3% 3% 3*2 ; Great North Pfd..... 23 27'4 27% ; Howe Sound .......... 48' 2 48% 48% : Happ Motors ......... 4% 4% 4% Huh-en Motors ........ 17% 16% 16% Illinois Central ....... 31% 31% 31% ! Industrial Rayon ...... 1 a % 74 74 I : • Bus Mach....... 143 7 a 143% 143% I Ii ti. Cement ........ 29 28% 28%. ; Intl. Harvester ....... 41 'a 40% 40% i Int! Hydro. Flee...... 8 8 8 ! Intl. Nickel ............. 29' 4 28% 28% : Intl. Salt .......... 28 28 28 Intl. Tel. A Tri...... 14% 14 14 Island Creek ......... 28 28 28 Johns Manville ........ 57'4 56% 56% ; Kane. City Sou........ 17% 16% 16% ; Kennecott ............. 22" a 21% 21 7 a Kresge ............... 201 „• 20% 20% Kroger Gro............ 32% 31% 31% Life Savers ............ 23 23 23 j La inber t Co............ 27 26 * ■ 27 I Lehigh . ............. 18% 18% 18'» Lehn Fink .......... OO! 22% 22% ■ I eh rn an Corp.......... 74 73 73 Libber Ovens 35% 35' 2 35% . I iggett ic JVI. "B“ ...... 94! j 94 94 Loews, Inc...... ...... 33 32% 32% I.collard ............... 18% 18 18 Liquid Carbonic ....... 33' j 32% 32% Mack Truck ........... 30'2 30% 30% R. H Macy ............ 46 46 46 Magma Copper ......... 20% 20% 2011 Marshall Field ....... 17% 17% 17% j Mathieson Alkali 341 j 34' j 34% McKesson Sr Rob . Pfd. 34% *33% 33' > ' Mid-Continental Pet 14 % 13% 13% M. K Sr T............. 11% 11% 11% I Monte.-Ward ......... 31 30% 30% Monsanto Chemical ..... 93 93 93 Natl. Distillers .......... 30% 29 7 a 29% ' Nash Motors ..... : Natl. Biscuit ...... Natl. Cash Rec;....... Nail. Dairy Prod. ... Natl. P. & L......... National Steel ...... N. Y. Central...... N. Y.. Chic . & St. L. New Haven ......... ; Norfolk & Western .. IN. Airier. Aviation .. Nor. Pacific ......... North Anni.......... Ohio Oil ............. I Otis S(eel ........... Otis Elevator ....... Owens Bottle ....... Pacific Gas & Flee. . Pacific Lighting ..... Packard ............. Penna. R R ... Penny, J C.......... Phillips Pete ........ Pillsbury Flour ...... Proctor <Y Gamble .. Public Svc. N. J. ... Pullman ............ Pure Oil ............. Purity Baking ....... Plymouth Oil ........ Radio Corp ........ Radio Corp Pfd. “B" Radio Keith ........ Reading ............. Republic I. & S. ... Reynolds Too. **B’’ . Remington-Rand ..... Schenley Distillers .... Scrvel Inc. .. ...... Safeway Stores ..... St. Joseph Lead..... Schulte Retail ....... Sears Roebuck ....... Shell Union Oil ..... F. H. Shattuck ...... Simmons Co.......... Socony-Vacuum ..... Son. Pacific .......... Sou. Ry............ Standard Brands .... S. O. Calif............ S. O. N. J........... Sou. Calif. Edison ... Standard Gas ........ Stewart Warner ...... Store & Webster .... ! Texas Co.......... Texas Gulf ......... Tex. Land Trust ..... . Timken •............ I Trans. America Corp. United Drug .......... Union Carbide ........ Union Pacific ........ i United Carbon ........ (United Fruit  ........ j United Gas Impt. ... U. S. Pipe & Foundry 1 U S. Alcohol ........ U. S. Realty ......... U. S. Rubber ......... U. S. Stee .......... ■ U. S. Steel, Pfd....... United Aircraft ...... United Corpn......... United Corpn.. Pfd. ... Utilities P. & L....... U. S. Sweltering ..... Vanadium ............ Vick Chem. ........... Warner Bros......... Western Md.......... Western Union ........ Westmgh Air Brake .. Westinghouse Elco. ... Westvaco  ......... Woolworth ............ Worthington Pump .. J High Low Close M 22% 21% 21% J# 45!* 41 41% • A 18% !3 18% ... 16% 16% 16% ... 11% 11 % ll % .. 50% 49% 49% ... 34 % 33% 33% .. 22*a 22% 22% ... 18% 18% 18% .. 180 leo 180_ ..; 6 5% 5% . .. 34 33% 33% . .. 18% 18% 18% ... 13 13 13 ... 6 % 61 a 61 s . .. 16% 16 16 ____85 85 85 ... IO 18% 18%. ... 347 a 33% 33% ... 5 4% 4 ■ a ...34 33% 33 s a ... 62% 62% 62% ... 19% 18% 18% ... 27 2612 26% ... 36% 35% 35% ... 38% 38% 38% ... 56 % 56 56 ... 12% 12 12 ... 16% 16% 16%. . .. 13% 13% 13% ... 8% 8% 8% .. 31% 30% 30% ... 8% 3% 3% . 52 52 52 . .. 21% 21 21 . .. 43% 43 43 ... IPs 11% IU .. 35 % 34 34% .. 8% 8 8 ... 54% 54% 54% .. . 22% 22 22 .. 6 *6 6 .. 49% 48% 48% ... 9 8% 8% .. IPs 11% 11% .. 19% 19% 19% .. 16% 16% 16% .. 27% 26% 26% .. 32% 32 32 . 21 % 21% 21 % .. 36% 36% 36% .. 45% 451 4 45% .. 17% 17% 17% .. 12% 12% 12%. .. 8% 8 ‘ a 8% .. 9% 9% 9% .. 6% 6 6 .. 60% 59% 59% .. 26% 26% 26% .. 35% 35% 35% . . 9 9 9 •* 3i' 4 32% 32% 7 6% 6% .. 18% 17% 17% .. 44 43 43% ..129 129 129 . , 44% 44 44 .. 74% 74-% 741 4 . . 16% 16% 16% . 27% 27* > 27% . 51% 51% 51% .. 9 8% 8% .. 22% 21% 22 .. 50 49 49% .. 94% 94 % 94% .. 23% 23% 23% ..' 61 a 6 6 . . 33% 33% 33% .. 3% 3% 3% . .120 119 119 257a 25% 25'4 .. 33% 33% 33% .. 7% 7 ! 8 7 % .. 15 15 15 .. 53 52% 52% .. 32 31 31 .. 29% 38% 39 DO 22 22 .. 53 52% 52% .27% 27 27 .. 5% 5% . 5% .. 26 % 26% 26% BUSINESS BRIEFS A quarterly dividend of 25 cents a share to stockholders of record May 25 was voted last week by the directors of the Monsanto Chemical company, of St. Louis. I which is the parent of the Rubber Service Laboratories, of Nitro. I The company reported net profit* of $674,177 for the first quarter of 1934, equivalent to $156 a share on the 432,000 shares outstanding, compared with a net i profit of $296,920, or 69 5 cents a share, for the corresponding period in 1933. j NEW YORK CURB NEW YORK, April 28 (UP)—Curb I stocks closed generally lower today I after renewed .selling had cancelled I small gains registered in leaders in 1 the first hour. Turnover was only * 121.000 shares, against 199,000 last Saturday. ! Public utility leaders such as Elec-| trio Bond and Share, Niagara Hudson Power, American Gas and United Gas ; hovered around previous closing lev-' els, but an easier tone developed I among favorites of the oil list such I as Imperial of Canada, International : Petroleum and Standard of Indiana, j Mining stocks were neglected, but I fair sized recessions went ahead in an early display of steadiness and Canadian whiskey stocks drifted lower along with other groups. Investment High Low Close Amn. Cyanamid “B’’ ... 21% 21% 21% Amn. Gas and Elect. ... 26% 26'/* 26% Aum. Superpower ...... 3% 3 3 Ass’d Gas “A” ......... I % % Atlas Corp............. Canadian Ind. Al “A” ., 13 12% 12% 13% 13% 13% Cities Service .......... 3% 3 3 Coi'bia Gas 5% cv. pfd. 94 94 94 Cord Corp.............. 6% 6 6 Distillers Seagram ..... 19% 19% 19% Electric Bond and Share 16% 16% 16% Ford Ltd................ 7% 7% 7% Hiriam Walker ......... 41 40 40% Lone Star .............. 7% 7% 7% Newmont Mining ...... 54 54 94 Niagara Hudson ........ 6% 6 V* 6% Pennroad ............... 3% 3% 3% Salt Creek .............. 7 7 7 St. Regis Paper ........ 4 4 4 Swift and Co........... 17% 17% 17% Swift Int’l ............. 30 3 ■ 30% 30% United Gas ............. 3% 3% 3% United L & P. “A” .... 3% 3% 3% United Verde Ext...... 4% 4% 4% NEW YORK BONDS NEW YORK. April 28 (UP)—The Youngstown S. & T. Approximate transactions 560.000 shares. PRODUCE PITTSBURGH. April 28 .UP).—Produce bond market drifted through an irregular week-end session today. A further rally in German issues featured the foreign list. Gains or more than a point were being made by German 5L;s and 7s. Other foreign bonds moved irregularly in a narrow rahge. Railroad bonds were well supported in the domestic corporation list. There were fractional gains in issues of the Nickel Plate. Southern Railways, Chicago and Northwestern and Illinois Central. Public utilities bonds were generally easier as a result of profit taking and fractional losses by such issues as Utility Power 5V2$v International Telephone convertible 4)-2S and American Foreign Power 5s. Industrials were steady to firm. Butter—Nearby tubs, 92 score extras Botany Mills issues continued to rise, the 6‘J* rising 2 points to 20. Aside from German issues the foreign issues moved irregularly in a narrow fonge. Argentine issues were firmer. 24%; standards 24J: 89 score 23*2; 88 score 2314. Eggs—Nearby receipts, first*, 14-14%: fresh extra firsts, 16:    nearby hennery whites, IT; southern Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky current receipts. 14. Poultry—Colored fat hens, 5 lbs., and up, 15; mediums, 15; Leghorn hens. 3% lbs and up, 13: mediums. 12; Barred Rock springers, large, 16: IU lbs and under, 16. colored springers, 4 lbs r?nd up, 16: mediums. 16; colored broilers 25-26: Plymouth Rock broilers. 26-27; Leghorn broilers 20-22; other colored broilers, 20-24; Leghorn springers, ll; old roosters 8-9; stags, ll; ducks 15-16; fat geese, 12: ordinary geese, 9: turkeys, young toms, 18: young hens. 20; capons. 18-22; fresh killed full dressed hens. 25; hog dressed. 21. Stock Exchanges Will Open One Hour Earlier All stock exchanges and their branch offices will open an hour earlier beginning Monday because of the inauguration on that date of daylight saving time. Everything in Plumbing, Paint & Electric To Everyone at Wholesale Prices HOUSE PAINT Per GALLON (Guaranteed) WORTH $2.50 .69 LIVE STOCK April 28 (UP) .- -Live A. J. Barnhart, will announce for tho Demonic state senate district, to suc- into a cocked hat. The Taylor announcement is said to have left Mr. Chilton in a state of political daze, and it had .somewhat of a similar effect on othei* party leaders. What steps Mr. Neely will take to meet the situation created by Mr. Taylor’s entry have not yet become apparent. Early in the campaign it was understood that he planned to back Representative John Keo, <>( Bluefield, for the senate nomination, but Mr. Keo withdrew as a prospective candidate after deciding to seek another nomination for the house of representatives* Graham Sa a a lawyer of Welch It is reported that Charleston attorney, soon as a candidate eratic nomination to from this, the eighth coed Senator Clyde B. Johnson, whose term expires this year. Mr. Barnhart was a member of tile house of delegates at the 1931 session and served as chairman of the judiciary committee. James Kay Thomas, member of tile present house of delegates, and Mrs. Myra Posson, daughter of Senator Johnson, also are being mentioned as possible senate candidates. A lively contest for tho Democratic i nomination to the state senate is expected in the fifth district, where A. J. Wilkinson, former house member, is opposing Delegate J. P. Beacom. for tho* honor. A report is current that Delegate Rush D. Holt, of Lewis county, is eon-sidet ing becoming a candidate against j Representative Andrew Edmmstori. I .Ti* , for the party' nomination to con-| gross in the Hind district. PITTSBURGH, stock: Hogs—Receipts 80(1; holdover, none; active. steady, top, $4:30; bulk 165-240 lb.. $4 30.    240-260 lh.. $4.10-54.25:    260-300 lh. $3.90-4.15;    160-180    !!> , $4 00-4.30;    140-160 tbs.. $3.50-4.00: 120-140 it) , $3.00-3.50; sows, $3.25. IO; 30. baby contest 3 VALUABLE PRIZES For the Prettiest Babies ALSO PRIZES FOR THE HEAVIEST & LIGHTEST BABY SEE BACK PAGE OF BABY SECTION for full particulars LEVIN BROS. Roof Paint 50c Gallon — Small Can Enamel 10c 30-Gallon Hot Water Tank $6= SAVE SUPPLY Co. Beautiful Kitchen Sinks Save y4 19 Hale St. Rear Ruffner Hotel BB Receipts. -Receipts Cattle Calves $7.00. Sheep —Receipts lambs here; good $9,00-9 25; medium shorn wethers, Sa.50 nominally steady, steady; top vealers. HOO; steady, few good to choice shorn lambs, kinds of $5.50-7.00; flown; good to choice spring lambs $11 00-11.50. CINCINNATI, O., April 28 (UP). Live stock; Hogs Receipts 1600 head including 623 direct .tori through, holdovers 2490 very little done; early bids and few Sols 160-300 lbs JO cents lower at 4 Most flesh arri! als and large holdovers of these weights from Friday field at 4.10. Few light light" at 3.25-3.75 and good packing sows 2 50-2.75; steadv. Cattle Receipts 650 head, calf receipts 50 he.Td. Sheep Receipts 25. Royal Fur STORAGE We Call and Deliver Kevt.sonahle Rates Phone :t«*SU HARRIS. UPHAM 8t CO Main Office ll WALI. STREET 135 SOUTH LA SALLE ST. CHICAGO NEW YOUK Bartlesville, Okla. Charleston, W. Va. Evanston, 111. Evansville. Ind. Huntington, Wk Va. Indianapolis. Ind. Milwaukee Wis S J O c K MEMBERS o Uptown Office 57H MADISON AVK. KANSAS CITY 912 BALTIMORE AVE Minneapolis, Mina. Oklahoma City Okla. St. Louis. 5Io. St. Paul. Minn. Tulsa, Okia Wichita. Ran. White Sulphur Sp’* W Va MEMBERS    NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE NEW VORK SKKh EM HANGE    CHICAGO BOAR!) OE TRADE MU VORK (CRB EXCHANGE    CHICAGO STOCK EXCHANGE MINNE A POLIS-SI. PAUL STOCK EXCHANGE Henry I,. Terrie, Manager Charleston, W. Va.    Telephone Capitol 27-121 Winthrop, Mitchell Co* Members New York Stock Exchange, and Other Leading Exchanges New York Kanawha Valley Building Chicago Boa”* of Telephone Capitol 35-131 Tra chica*® n* 26 Broadway CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA Waller C. Hardy Resident Partner G. Herman Pierson Asst. Manager Direct private wires to New York, Chicago and other market centers. Stocks, bonds and commodities dealt in for cash or carried on conservative margin. Telephone Capitol 35-131 ;
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