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  • Publication Name: Chariton Leader
  • Location: Chariton, Iowa
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  • Years Available: 1874 - 1987
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View Sample Pages : Chariton Leader, September 15, 1910

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Chariton Leader (Newspaper) - September 15, 1910, Chariton, Iowa THE CHARITON LEADER Giwe your wife a chance to develop into a business woman. You can do it this summer out of the profits of your crops. You can install an I. H. C. Cream Separator and a Gasoline Engine on your farm at surprisingly small cost. Thè gasoline engine —two horse-power at two cents an hour—runs the churn« the cream separator, the washing machine, the cider mill —draws the water-besides sawing your wood, chopping your feed, shelling and shredding your corn. Gives your farm hand time to look after more cows, and the cream separator, too. Relieves the women folk of drudgery —gives your wife opportunity to quadruple her earnings from butter, eggs, chickens and garden truck. I.H.C. gasoline engines and cream separators are the best in the world. A dealer everywhere. J.OOK FOR THIS MARK International 'Harvester* Company of America ((bcsipcnted) Chicago, U. S. A. When Jefferson, then in France, handed Talleyrand ft copy of the Con-ititutlon of the United States' Talleyrand said: "At last liberty,and equality, are imbedded in th* charter of a ewfcpeople." Referring to this, re-Globe-Democrat writer, says: Tht idea made .such an apneal to the rtaln* liberalism of that, day that Franc* adopted a, constitution in 1792, at the, birth of. Its. first republic, and, under, the lnfli|ence; of Bonparte, the Helvetic republic of Switzerland, which had been playing, at democracy for five centuries,., framed a constitution of 1188, In the.next quarter of a century charters based on the American idea were framed in most of the states between the Rio Grande and Cape Horn. England's constitution, then and still unwritten, consisted of Various con-cesilons extorted from its kings, sup-«¿•JMWeiby acts^of parliament, and these received large extensions in the friuiohise acts of 1832, 1867 and 1884, under whioh^he basis of . the elector-alrnqpfcas hroadas it is in the ujuted States. The, house of Haps-"Urg, an older and a prouder dynasty than that for whioh WilHam ll. speaks, *ffj within the ..recollection of men •»11. living, compelled to abandon MetternicWs teacbinsrsaaii, to give! a voice to ita people in the management of their attain. A little ,over twenty years ago Japan Introduced a written charter Into Asia.. Except Morocco ana Abyssinia, evisry .country In the world'which, is Important enough to get on the map of today hAejcppstltu-won written or unwritten, or, like CWn». Ja going through the preliminaryaUra ofig^tipg one. Less than two-thirds of a.century ago, a certain monarch of the ttyiufoiOt Hoheozollern had suchaUgb regard for his people ther«>tu»jj*J, as fae phrased it, to 'a paper charter, like, a second Mfora Frederick StâW ' ?** ^ Whep tbe .WÎÏP' the various *t%tes Qf the près- ; ÄasäÄ L^.^çniméntôveR which,William ^ ruiee todir thcymay or-may not ¿iosplratloa St their Uliamll. . t»>ousrb of'Prus- to preside, has. a constitution which confers manhood suffrage in the election of the lower and greater branch of its parliament, and at his aocesion, William took an oath to observe its limitations. Nobody will wonder at the surprise with which the leading German newspapers received theFree Sample Aids Old Men The sudden change from years of activity of both body and 'mind to the quiet \of later years causes the human system to undergo many changes, chief of which is in the digestive organs." It becomes harder and harder to get ths bowels to move promptly and regularly and in consequence many elderly men suf-fer'not only from the baslo touble, con-■tlpatloiu but from.Indigestion, headache, belching, sour stomach, drowsiness after eating and similar annoyances. It Is first of all necessary to keep the bowels open and then to tone th* digestive muscles so as to get them to again do their work naturally. A violent cathartic or purgative to not only; unnecessary but Harmful, and something mild will do the work Just as well. After you have got through experimenting with salts and pills and waters of various kinds, and have become convinced that they do only temporary good at best, then try Dr. Caldwell's Syrup Pepsin, a mild, gentle, pleasant-tasting laxative tonic that is especially adapted to the requirements of old people, women and children, and yet Is effective enough for anybody. Your druggist, who has handled It successfully. ,«>r ft quarter of a century, wl" «ell you a bottle for fifty cents or, one dollar, but If you want to make a test of it before spending any money •end your name and address to Dr. Caw-welhand he will gladly send you a sarnie bottle free of charge. . This remedy Is rapidly displacing all otlMfr formi of. medication for the cyr; of stomach,, liver and bowsl trouble, MM fsmllleslllte Mr. O. P. Wisher's of Br»' TOrt E iM JIni CwTie-Cullsr-sISi IMN.Notre Dime street, South Bend. Infe arejuow; n«iver without It In the house. n»2y have tested If ud knowJU SI value to every member ot the fbdAwilLpenonalhr will be pleas«! »ry?Jany nw«lic«i advice you nay J for yourself or tolly pertaining'to th. ^h.^v^J.w.fc ka-er's outburst. It is an echo in IS'10 of a voice of 1710 or 1010. 'Why,' aiks the Tagelich Rundschau, 'should the emperor choose this moment to emphasize liU ruling by. God's grace, and his own right, when it will nourish acti-monaichial agitation, and good moi archists be thrown into tragic disruption?' On this side of the Atlantic, where the kaiser has many admirers, his words will hardly carry the portentous Import which Europe will be inclined to give them. The German press undoubtedly takes them seriously. If they carry the menace which those near at hand believe that they bear, they are a change to democracy which will be promptly accepted in his country. What answer will the socialists, the radicals, and the national liberals make to this challenge when, early in November, the reich-stag assembles'?" While Mr. Roosevelt was on his western trip the New York Evening Post attacked him editorially. Writing in the Outlook Mr. Roosevelt replies to the Post in this way: "In the struggle for honest politics there is no more a place for a liar than there is for a thief, and in the movement designed to put an end to the domination of the thief but little good can be derived from the assistance of the liar. Of course objection will be made to my use of this language. My answer is that I am using it mere scientifically and descriptively and because no other terms express the facts with the necessary precision. In the article in which the Evening Post comes to the defense of those In present control of the republican party in New York state, whom it affected to oppose in the past, the Evening Post, through whatever editor personally wrote the article, practiced every known form of mendacity. As far as I am concerned every man visited the White House openly and Mr. Harriman among others. I took no money from Mr. Harriman, secretly or openly to buy votes or for any other purposes. Whoever wrote the article in the Evening Post knew that this was the foulest and basest 1 ie. The statement of the' Post is not only false and malicious, is not only in direct contradiction of the facts, but is such that it could only have been made by a man who, knowing the facts deliberately intended to pervert them. Such an act stands on a level of infamy with the worst act ever performed by a corrupt member of a legislature or city olllcial and stamps,the writer with tne same moral brand that stamps the bribe taker." The New York Evening Post, responding to Colonel Roosevelt's editorial in the Outlook, says: "Mr. Roosevelt writes In the Outlook that the editor of the Evening Post is a 'liar' and adds.that.objection will be .made to that language. Not by us. We regard It as a decoration. To be thought worthy of receiving the order of merit which Mr. Roosevelt has bestowed upon so many distinguished citi/.ens makes us, in his own words, 'very proud and also very humble.' We supported measures to force corporations , out of politics, especially to make.it illegal for them to contribute money,, to political campaigns, long before Mr. Roosevelt, and did our best to makq eorporation gifts to politicians odious at the very time when Mr. Roosevelt's agents were collecting hundreds of thousands of dollars from them to help elect him president. In view of all this, we will not retort Mr. Rooseyelt's word upon him, but will merely say he has been misinformed." In conclusion the Post says: "It is plain that the president urged Mr. Harriman repeatedly and cordially to come to the White House and that, in fact, Mr. Harriman, after he did go to. see Mr. Roosevelt made a contribution of $50,000 and Harriman himself said, 'I was not a political manager. I could help to raise money.' This he did, collecting $200,000, by the expenditure of which sum, he wrote to Sidney Webster 'at least 50,000 voters were turned in the city of New York alone.' " Many Chariton People Fail Realize the Seriousness. to Governor Carroll, In an address delivered on the state fair grounds at the Capital City last Wednesday, to a representative audience of Iowans, gave expression to some good advice— if the average Iowan with money and energy will take It seriously, by united action, the result will be felt. Extracts of the governor's address follow: "Of course we all" encourage the Investment of outside capital In Iowa, but the thing we must most encourage Is to keep Iowa capital at home. "Iowa has enough home capital to do anything which it undertakes In that respect I want to speak of the autos. Millions of dollars are going out of the state everv year for mitomo-bilès. With a few exceptions these machines are all manufactured in other stateB—Iowa merely retains the commissions. So I say the location of automobile factories in Iowa is of great importance to this state. It matters not where they are located, for there should exist between usa community of Interests." Governor Carroll then took up the Peterson law, which, it is claimed, is driving capital from the state. "The enforcement of the Peterson law has no doubt, hurt the people of this statei" Governor Carroll said. "It haa driven outside capital from the state—it has injured home corporations. So I believe the legislature should take it up and change it, if possible. But I do not favor its repeal entirely, for I am strongly opposed to the watering of atooka. But some provision Should be made so that It will encourage and not discourage the investment of capital in Iowa. "Our anxiety and our earnest dgslre to control and regulate the corporations in our state, I believe in many instances, has prompted us to go beyond the limit in choosing those power*. In defining such powers we should not cripple industries by the enactment of unfavorable laws. But the principal of prohibiting the watering of stocks, I believe, should be maintained, , . "Forty-five representees of commercial organization» in all parU or thé state attended the meeting Friday morning • " * and we must encourage the investment of local capital in local industriel. That li one of the essentials of suca«M.y A ' 1 1 1 " • ' . -""" For Sale —A 106/ acre farm, 3« miles of town. AJVJarm land. Good , and fair, barn. i.Teçm», »3,008 cepl It comes and goes—keeps you guess-ing. Learn the cause—then cure it. Nine times out of ten it comes from the kidneys. That's why Doan's Kidney Pills cure it. Cure every kidney 111 from the backache to diabetes. Here's Chariton case to»prove it: J. B. Stokesburg, 1509 Franklin Ave., Chariton, Iowa, says: "I am willing to confirm the public testimonial I gave three years ago in favor of Doan's Kidney Pills. A member of my family who was afflicted with kidney complaint took Doan's Kidney i'lllsand they affected a cure after other preparations bad failed to be of the least benefit. I have often advised acquaintances afflicted with kidney complaint to give Doan's Kidney Pills a trial." For sale by all dealers. Price 50 cents. Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo, New York, sole agents for the United States. Remember the name—Doan's—and take no other. The World's Biggest City. The ancient city of London would belter be putting. In its best licks in the matter of growth of population during the next ten vears, if lt^ wants to remain the world's biggest city. The official count of the 1910 census gives New York a little oyer four and three-quarters millions, a gain of one and one-third millions In the past ten years, and it is growing faster than ever before. Somewhere there must be a limit to the possible population of a single city, provided our notion of a city remains as It has been In the paBt. But there is no certaldty that the physical size of cities will be limited In the future as it has been in the past. Nowadays twenty miles Is no great distance for a man to travel dally from his residence to his place of business, and within a decade it may be that a hundred miles will be no greater. Transportation is'almost keeping up with city growth. We shall never be frightened at the matter of speed. As soon as some genius makes it possible for one to travel a hundred miles in thirty minutes or so, cities like New York will grow faster than ever In population.— World-Herald. 'A Reliable Medicine-Not A Narcotic. Mrs. F. Marti, St. Joe, Mich., says Foley's Honey and Tar saved her little boy's life. She writes: "Our Utile boy contracted a severe bronchial trouble and as the doctor's medicine did not cure him, I gave him Foley's Honey and Tar In which I have great faith. It cured the cough as well as the choking and gagging spell, and he got well In a short time. Foley's Honey and Tar has many times saved us much trouble and we are never without it In the house.—J. D. Bearaan. "A school-ma'am Is a verb because she denotes action when you throw paper wads at the girls. Switch is a conjunction, and is used to connect the verb school ma'am to the noun boy. This is a compound sentence, of which boy Is the subject and switch is the object. First person, singular number and awful case. A school ma'am Is different from a boy, a boy wears pants and a school ma'am wears her hair banged all over her forehead. She puts paint on her face and some big fellows come along and take her home. Ma says a school ma'am never. getB to be older than eighteen until she gets married. It takes two school ma'ams a day to cook a dinner." I. N. Bowen returned home day from a business trip to City. Thurs-Kansas ■C« '»Is A Dr. Tz^red A_. SaAxm. Exclusive Specialist, Eye, Ear, Nose,Throat Offloa »<1 Boipiwi, o«w.y Block, /~»U a Inurn SonthMM Cohur of the Squ>n Vllai UUIlf IUWO Every encampment, even of the wandering Arabs, has a guest tent, where the stranger is always welcome. The tnudlf, as It is called, is like the other tents, excepting in size, and to It the traveler, upon arriving, makes his way. Stopping before it, he gives his horse to an attendant, sticks his. long spear into the ground at the tent entrance, and leaving his sandals without, enters and salutes and squats on the ground to wait until some of the bitter Arab coffee is served to him. By tasting the coffee he has accepted the hospitality of the sheik, and has become a temporary member of the tribe. There he may remain for a certain time, eating of the food which the sheik must provide him, and, protected by the Arabs, he may wander about their territory at will and In perfect safety.. Thus In whatever part of the Inhabited desert one may travel, one will always find shelter, and in most places also food.—Professor E. J. Banks, in The Christian Herald. Unclaimed Letters in P. 0. Unclaimed letters remaining In the postotlice at Chariton, Iowa, week ending September 10, 1910: Miss M. C. Allen. Miss Fern Anderson, Maria Bradley (2), Mack Croyde, Cyril Eicherly, ,T. B. Eicherly, Chas. Faulkner, Don L. Gibbs, Roy Harold, A. 15. Randall, Mrs. 13. D. Shackleford, Miss SIeb, Mrs. M. E Vaughn (2), R. A. Hasselquist, P. M. Bryan to Speak William J. Bryan has consented to make at least two speeches In the 8th congressional district during the campaign. A. L. Yocom, M. D. Graduate Keokuk '88. A. It. Yocon, JR., M.D QraduateU. XIU., '09 YOCOM <fe YOCOM Physicians and Surgeons Special Attention Qiven to Surgery, Obstetrics and Electro-Therapeutics Ofllce at Hospital, Dewey Block, Charlton, la. ORlee Phone 4«. Residence Phone 31. Jessie M. MclntirePiano and Voice Post-graduate of the Kroeger School of Music. Studio, Oppcnbelmer Uloolc, Charlton, laDr. C. L. Brittell Physician and Surgeon. All calls promptly answered day or night. Office over Chailton National Bank, In Penick Block', West Side Square. Phone No. 194. J. A. McKLVEEN, M. D. ECLECTIC PHYSICIAN Office and Residence, one Block South of Post Office. Chariton, Iowa. PHONES; Office. 15 A: Residence, 16. T. M. Stuart C. W. Stuart, F. Q. Stuart Homestead Relinquishments. For particulars of securing improved homesteads by relinquishment in the Huntley irrigation Project, the greatest sugar beet, alfalfa, grain and apple country In the Great Northwest, close to schools, churches and good markets, where the climate is Ideal and crop failure unknown. Call on or write to J. A. Hahdin, and J. Homiok Hancock; (4t) Ballantlne, Montana. Notice of Proof of Will. ss. STATE OP IOWA, Lucas County, district coukt in vacation: To All Whom It May Concern: Notice Is hereby given that an Instrument in writing, purporting to be the last Will and Testament of John W. Eastes, deceased, was this day produced and read by the undersigned, and that I have fixed the 1st day of November, A. D. 1010 as the day for hearing proof in relation thereto. Witness my olllcial signature, with the Seal of said Court, hereto affixed this 5th day ot September, 1910. ¡¡SZ J. H. Collins, 36-3t Clerk of District Court. FOR SALE A lot of Pure Bred Shropshire, rams, from imported buck. Good ones. Parsons & Son, Chariton, IowaSTUART, STUART & STUART ATTOKNKYS AT LAW rructlco In nil courta. TltleH to lund carefully uxumlnud und corrected. Ketutea properly oxamlneit. Olile«: over Luca» Co. National Unnk, UUurlton, Iowa.W. W. Bulman ...Attorney at Law... SPECIAL attention given . to settlement of Estates and Collections. In Office rooms formerly occupied by W. H. Barger, west Side Square. 4-1-8 CHARITON, • - IOWAC. E. FROCGATT,LICENSED UNDERTAKER With the finest Uearse in Southern Iowa, I am in position to serve the people of Lucas county professionally and with best equipment. All calls answered promptly day or night. Phones: Store 204; Residence 317. CHARITON, IADr. Trimmer the Chicago Specialist will be at BATES HOTEL, CHARITONSaturday, Oct. 8 and"return every 28 days immmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmwmwK CHARITON LOAN AND INV. CO. ) WANTS TO SEE YOU 1 If you want to If you want to If you want to If you want to If you want to If you want to buy a Farm sell your farm Insure your House borrow money lend money SAVE money C. W. LARIMER, TR. iaiüiiUüiüiüiüiaiüiaiaiUiUiUiaiiiiüiaiiiiaiaiaiüiiiii c ENTRAL FELLA cOLLEGE IOWA DEPARTMENTS ThaColl««* Th* Acadsmy Normal School Conservatory of . Music Softool of Commorco School of Stanofraphy School of Blblo Study School of Oratory , School of Physical Culture FEATURES Good endowment Fine larfe BulMlnl and Campus Fine Dormitory for Ladles Large Libraries and Lab'ratorlos IS Professors and Instructors . Modern Metkods of Teaching Complete, up-to-date Equipment • Fine cOHele Spirit Athletics Encouraged A school where the best training can be had at a reasonable cost. A school that la adaptedito the wants of western people/ A school thkt alway* stood an ita merit* and always ranked high. Our motto: "To Ed neat* rather than.Graduate." Yonnff Peoples' societies. , literary socjigtle?. ' Glee clubs. SK'* Fall term open? Sep^njt^jr H, 191Qjj Sejid for CafcU*. Adhéra PresMnitJohuL.Beyl,Pella.lowa The Regular and Reliable Specialist Cisu permanently the cue* he undertakes andMnda the incurable home without taking • fee from them. Thle U wbr he continue* hkviaite year alter year while other •pecialbU have made ■ few «¡lilt and ceaeed to return.DR. TRIMMER OF CHICAGO An eminent!/ auccessful Specialist In all chronic dlaeaee*. proven by the nmny cures eS«cted In chronic caaee, which bad baffled Uie(kill ot all other phyalclaoa. Hla boapltal experience and extenalve practice hare made him ao proficient, that he can name and locate a dlaeaee In a (ew momenta. Treats all curable caa«s of Catarrh. Noae, Throat and Lnnir dlseaaea. Eye and Ear. Stomacb^Llver and Kidneys, Orarel, Bbenuatlan), Paralysis, nenralgla, Nervous and Heart diseases, Brlght'a dlseaseln early atagea, diaeaaed Bladder and Female Organs and Bi£oWiilMVTlim-A new discorery which poei-tlvely cureeSSpercentot easee treated. PILES Every case cured without detention from holiness, Sexual, Weakness and Private Diseases a Specialty Syphlllla, Gonorrhea, Stricture, Gleet, SpeoM-, torrhce. Seminal Weekn»as. Lost Manhood and th* effects of Early Vic® or Eseaas. prodaslMp. RnualS-•Ions, Debility, Nerronsnsss. bluloaae. betecttv« I Memory, etc.. which ruins mind and body Poaz< . xitblt ODBBD. »' WPNDERFUL CURES «ted In old cases which have b«M> ui Perfected .................. ....... . or unaklllfully treated. No ex perl meals or We undertake no Incurable cassa, boti 1 (WM tuttodì*. ioieorealtartj.7 CoMikatM» Frae^agd I Addissi D* mm WCRftC' ;
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