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Cedar Rapids Gazette Newspaper Archives Jul 11 2015, Page 1

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Cedar Rapids Gazette (Newspaper) - July 11, 2015, Cedar Rapids, Iowa Saturday, July 11, 2015 Eastern Iowa’s independent, locally owned newspaper www. thegazette. com $ 1.00 Daily KCRG- TV9 FIRST ALERT WEATHER, 6B TODAY 83/ 71 Storms w/ heavy rain Sunday Monday 86/ 72 88/ 70 Bohemian chic Search for wedding jewelry becomes woman’s business opportunity Living, 1C Dogs and cats comfort patients at hospitals Iowa Today, 7A Health VOL. 133 NO. 183 © 2015 The Gazette • BUSINESS 380 ........................... 10A • CLASSIFIEDS ................................ 3C • COMICS ...................................... 12A • DEAR ABBY .................................. 8C • DEATHS ........................................ 8A • LIVING .......................................... 1C • LOTTERY ....................................... 7A • PUZZLES ...................................... 8C • RIVER LEVELS .............................. 7A • SPORTS ........................................ 1B • TV ................................................. 6B • WEATHER ..................................... 6B © 2015 The Gazette Seeing the benefits of cover crops, with radishes and rye By Orlan Love, The Gazette BRANDON — Strips of deep- rooted, thick- stemmed native plants growing on the contours of Dick Sloan’s cornfield slow the runoff from heavy rain, saving soil and nutrients while improving wildlife habitat. The blooming prairie flowers also provide a home for pollinating insects, which was a major factor in Sloan’s decision to plant native vegetation on 4.5 acres that had been devoted to row crops. “ I started hearing about the decline of pollinating insects about five years ago and wanted to establish some perennial plants to help them out,” Sloan said at a recent field day to demonstrate the conservation practice on his farm near Brandon. “ If you are interested in having a place for the birds where beneficial insects can overwinter, consider prairie strips,” he said. Sloan, an early adopter of conservation practices, started planting cover crops in 2011 — long before it was cool — and now covers his entire 700- acre farm with 16 different species ranging from rye to radishes. He planted his prairie strips — a mix of 29 native species of grass, forbs and legumes — in June 2012 without the assistance of the Iowa State University- based STRIPS program. STRIPS — Science- based Trials of Rowcrops Integrated with Prairie Strips — began in the fall of 2003 at a single site at the Neal Smith Wildlife Refuge near Prairie City. Today, STRIPS personnel, some of whom were at Sloan’s field day, have helped more than 20 farmers across Iowa and northern Missouri — including Cedar Rapids- owned farmland near The Eastern Sale left to retailer’s discretion By Lindsay Dunsmuir, Reuters WASHINGTON — The suspect in the shootings of nine black churchgoers in Charleston, S. C., was able to buy a gun due to a mix- up in a background check that should have revealed an admission of drug possession, FBI Director James Comey said on Friday. The examiner of suspect Dylann Roof’s federal background check did not see a police report in which Roof admitted to drug possession, which would have barred him from buying the weapon, Comey told reporters at a briefing. Comey said he had ordered a full review. “ We are sick that this has happened. We wish we could turn back time,” he said, adding that FBI agents were meeting with victims’ families to share the news and that the examiner involved was “ heartbroken.” Roof, a 21- year- old white man linked to racist views, is charged in the June 17 shootings at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, where the nine were gunned down during a Bible- study session. The FBI runs background checks for gun dealers in about 30 states, including South Carolina. According to Comey, on April 13 — two days after Roof attempted to purchase a gun — a background check examiner ran his criminal history, which brought up a felony FBI: Suspected shooter got gun due to mix- up CHARLESTON AGRICULTURE Orlan Love/ The Gazette Dick Sloan stands in one of his prairie strips during a mid- June field day to demonstrate the conservation practice on his farm near Brandon. Field day Dylann Roof GOVERNMENT HEALTH CARE ; FIELD DAY, PAGE 9A ; SHOOTING, PAGE 9A Report: Low- income women have poorer mental, physical health By Chelsea Keenan, The Gazette As education and income levels drop, so does a woman’s access to health care. That’s according to the 2015 Condition of Women report, put out by United Way of East Central Iowa. The report touched on a variety of factors, including access to care, behaviors and environment. “ It’s hard for women struggling to make ends meet to be well,” said Leslie Wright, vice president of community building at United Way of East Central Iowa. “ Health and well- being is driven by socioeconomic factors.” Almost all the issues the report highlighted can be tied to lower socioeconomic status, from fewer health screenings to greater rates of depression. Many barriers can prevent poorer women from accessing health care and services such as lack of transportation, trouble taking time off work or no health insurance, experts said. Every few years United Way releases a Condition of the Community report, which looks at the area as a whole. But Wright said this is the first time it pulled data solely on the health of Iowa women. It was presented in May to the Women’s Leadership Initiative, a group that has raised more than $ 1 million to fund efforts helping women in Linn County. Wright said the report helped refocus the group’s efforts and already has resulted in funding two new positions at local not- for- profits — a social worker position at the Eastern Iowa Health Center and a care coordinator at the Area Substance Abuse Council. “ We just want to support women in being healthy,” Wright said. Low- income women are less likely to get regular breast cancer screenings, which are recommended Women’s health tied to status ; HEALTH, PAGE 9A KC McGinnis photos/ The Gazette Dave Graham of Cedar Rapids smokes a cigarette while preparing for a round of golf with Jim Rose of Cedar Rapids on Friday at Ellis Golf Course in Cedar Rapids. The remnants of a cigar lie on the ground Friday outside the patio space at Ellis Golf Course. THREAT TO SMOKING ON LINKS ON HOLD Golfers at Ellis call proposed ban goofy By Rick Smith, The Gazette CEDAR RAPIDS — Taking on the city’s golfers can seem like the third rail of local elective politics. On a beautiful Friday morning at the Ellis Golf Course, there was not a golfer to be found who had much good to say about a city proposal to impose a ban on smoking on the four city- owned golf courses. “ Smoking on the golf course doesn’t bother me,” said non- smoker John Norris of Cedar Rapids as he finished his early morning round of golf with five others. “ A ban would be ridiculous. I wouldn’t vote for anyone ( running for City Council) who voted for a ban. ; SMOKING BAN, PAGE 9A

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