Page 3 of Feb 13 2001 Issue of Brandon Sun in Brandon, Manitoba

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Brandon Sun (Newspaper) - February 13, 2001, Brandon, Manitoba A3 tuesday february 13, 2001 local got a news tip can 727-2786 toll free 1-877-786-5786 you can reach Sun assignment editor Peter Dalla Vicenza at 571-7430. Email opinion Chase leads to jail by Dean Pritchard Brandon Sun sometimes its just better to Cut your losses. A 25-year-old City Man who led police on his third High Speed Chase in As Many years was sentenced in Brandon provincial court yesterday to 15 months in jail. Blaine Edward Smith pleaded guilty to dangerous driving driving Over .08, and driving while prohibited. Court heard Smith was on parole for two prior drinking related High Speed chases when he tried to avoid a police Check Stop near Victoria Avenue and Mcdiarmid drive at 11 24 ., Jan. La. Smith driving a 1991 Dodge spirit made a Quick a Tum when he saw the Check Stop and headed East to 18th Street launching a 50-Kilometre High Speed Chase through the City and surrounding area. Police pursued Smith West on the trans Canada Highway North on Highway 270 and East on a gravel Road before the Chase ended on the trans Canada near Douglas after Smith ran Over a Spike Belt. The Chase lasted 28 minutes and speeds ranged Between 80 and 160 pm a. When arrested Smith refused to identify him self and blew a breath Reading of .16, twice the Legal limit. Crown attorney Shauna Hewitt Michta said it was fortunate the Chase took place in relatively Low traffic areas or someone could easily have been killed. A emr. Smith showed a total and utter disregard for other people on the Road a Hewitt Michta said. A a it a important for the court to note this was not a display of bravado but the actions of a defence lawyer Bob Harrison said before the night of the Chase Smith had not had a drink for six months and was upset after learning he would be losing his Job soon. Smith told court his actions were stupid and that he a trying to get help to Stop drinking. A a in a a Good person i just make wrong decisions a he said. Judge David Coppleman sentenced Smith to 15 months in jail and prohibited him from driving for five years. If there a a next time Coppleman said the sentence will be a lot longer. A when you get out i Hope you learn that if you keep doing this sort of thing 15 months in jail is going to seem like a walk in the dangerous driving carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison. Quake funds reach $4,000 by Kevin Engstrom for the Sun local organizations raising Money to Aid those affected by violent earthquakes in both Al Salvador and India last month have netted almost $4,000 in donations so far. Included among that Cash will be $1,500 raised from a special fund raising concert held at St. Mary a anglican Church last thursday night. The concert which featured performances by former Canadian opera company Singer Janet Field Moase and Barbershop group women in Harmony was a huge Success according to Rev. Garry Macdowall. A it was marvellous. It was just very special a said Macdowall. A everybody went Home with something wonderful that night but the biggest winners were the people 10,000 Miles away who will Benefit from the Money we Macdowall said the funds will go toward supplies such As blankets food and fresh water. In addition to the churches efforts the Marquis project has raised More than $2,000 to Aidel salvadorian Relief efforts. A the Money we Send will go from people in this country to the people in Al Salvador who need our help a said Marquis executive director Zack Gross. Gross said the goal is to get the numbers to $3,000 within the next week. To do that Marquis is relying on efforts being made by students at some schools within the Westman Region including Neelin. Thanks to a donation of 42 dozen donuts from seven local bake shops across the City Neelin students were Able to raise More than $220 in support of the Relief efforts in Al Salvador. Raleigh Mosiuk 16, said she and other classmates Felt a need to help others. A a it a a horrible thing to happen and you have to help them out and see if you can make somebody a Day and help them out in any Way you can a said Mosiuk. A in a situation like that everything a just wrecked Down there and since its Al Salvador you know they done to have the Money to fix it a Jan. 12 earthquake m Al Salvador measuring 7.6 on the Richter scale killed at least 700 and destroyed 90,000 Homes. Two weeks later a 7.7 tremor in Gujarat India killed at least 14.000 people. More than 600.000 Homes were levelled. Virus tonnes of tomes lab kept Busy by Scott Edmonds Canadian press Winnipeg a Canadas Only lab capable of handling the worlds deadliest viruses has been mightily tested in the last few weeks but its officials say it has passed with flying colours. A ifs been an incredibly hectic time a said or. Frank Plummer head of the microbiology Laboratory at the Canadian Centre for human and animal health. Scientists at the High tech High Security Centre in Winnipeg have been working virtually around the clock most recently to see if a woman visitor from Africa brought the dreaded ebola virus into the country. The woman remains critically ill in a Hamilton Hospital but health authorities no longer fear she May have carried ebola or a similar disease to North Amanca. A a there a never been an incident like this woman from Congo before a Plummer said monday. A there Are contingency plans in place to Deal with these kinds of things and i think we dealt with it Well this time. In a particularly proud of the Job the level 4 program did the most deadly pathogens such As ebola Are classified As level 4 viruses. They must be handled in special facilities that have the ultimate in safeguards to prevent accidental contamination. About 16 level 4 viruses have been identified worldwide so far most originating in Africa or South America. The Winnipeg Centre which opened in 1999, is one of Only about 15 in the world. A we were ready for this a said or. Heinz Feldmann head of the special pathogens Section. A we Hope its not going to happen often or soon the Hamilton incident followed on the heels of health scares in Toronto Ottawa and Victoria posed by feared Bio terrorist attacks. Packages containing mysterious substances were sent to government offices in Toronto and Ottawa and to a Wal Mart in the Victoria area. In All three cases the substances were examined at the Winnipeg lab and turned out to be harmless. A most of our colleagues in the United states. Have handled Many hoaxes a said Kathryn Bernard the head of the special bacteriology Section. A a they re not very common in this Colin Corneau Brandon Sun Heather Carruthers reaches to take a Book from a High shelf late yesterday afternoon at Mcgilligan booksellers. Workshop explores climate changes by Lynden Behm Brandon Sun the Impact of climate change on both farming and the Riding Mountain Region will be examined at a workshop saturday in Rossburn. In addition to providing information through presentations people who attend the workshop will also be surveyed for their views by a University of Manitoba student who will use this information As part of his masters thesis. A the purpose of my research is to find out what people know and what they think a Randall Shymko. A i want to give the Public the Opportunity to listen to information on climate change a said Shymko who also organized the workshop. A they will also have the Opportunity to give their own views on climate one of the presenters will be Bevan Lawson climate trends meteorologist for the Prairies and Northern Canada. He said that computerized weather models provide some interesting information. The most probable scenarios would have the temperature in the Manitoba Prairies rising by an average of 2-3 c during Summers and 3-4.5 c during Winter Over the next half Century. This could have a big effect on agriculture such things As what crops could be grown he said. Quot there Are two thugs to look at if you Are a Farmer. One is risk. The other is Opportunity a he said explaining that change provides new opportunities. Complicating everything is that global warming will affect different areas of the world differently. For instance it has been projected that North America will be affected More than the Earth on average and that the Prairies will warm More than the rest of the continent he said. Climate change could affect such things As the length of Winters and growing seasons and How quickly water runs Oft following melts. However he said he did no to want to predict specifically How crops or natural vegetation would be affected because that Wasny this area of expertise. A presenter from the Prairie farm rehabilitation administration will look at the Impact on agriculture the workshop is from 9 30 . To 4 15 In the Community Centre Hall in Rossburn. The workshop is sponsored by the Riding Mountain biosphere reserves the Prairie adaptation research co operative and the University of Manitoba. The deadline for pre registration has passed but registration will also be available at the door Shymko said. Federal auditors enter treatment Centre Sage eng first nation a Federal auditors entered the offices of a controversial aboriginal treatment Centre on the weekend to restart an audit interrupted three weeks ago by a Legal Challenge. Managers at the Virginia Fontaine addictions foundation 145 Kilometres Northeast of Winnipeg have been co operative said health Canada spokesman Jeff Pender. Last week associate chief Justice Jeffrey Oliphant of the Manitoba court of Queens Bench upheld health Canadas right to Cut off $7.5 million a year in funding to the Centre. That and the audit of the centres books came after the foundation sent staff on a paid Caribbean cruise last fall. The foundation has continued operating despite a Federal decision dec. I to Cut off its $600,000-per-month funding. The foundation is estimated to still be treating up to 50 patients by drawing on millions of dollars in surplus funds accumulated from health Canada funding Over the years. The Federal department is suing to recover those funds but a department lawyer has said the Centre May have already used a million dollars since funding was Cut off. Pender said health Canada has gained no ground in its bid to move patients out of the addictions treatment Centre. A we can to just go in there and kick Down doors and move people a said Pender. Health Canada does no to even know exactly How Many patients Are living at the treatment Centre he said. A Canadian press thief on probation does no to have to take his Medicine Winnipeg up a a teenage thief does not have to obey a court order to take Medicine while on probation if he does no to want to the Manitoba court of Appeal ruled yesterday. The court overturned a lower court ruling that forced the 17-year-old to take medication prescribed by his psychiatrist or be charged with a crime. A a person lose the right to make decisions about their own medical treatment a the teens lawyer Michael Walker had argued. His client pleaded guilty last year to break enter and theft and several charges of breaching court orders. A judge sentenced him to four months of open custody to be followed by one year of supervised probation. A forensic report revealed the teen has emotional and psychological problems and requires ongoing psychiatric consultation and monitoring. The judge therefore decided to include on his probation order a clause that required the teen to take medication As prescribed. If he refused the teen would face a new criminal charge for breaching his probation order. During an Appeal court hearing last month his lawyer argued the clause was illegal and violated the charter of rights. Under the mental health act people 16 years of age or Over Are considered mentally competent to make their own treatment decisions. Exceptions Are made for forced treatment Only in unusual cases. Walking a mile in each others shoes Brandon Sun editor Glenn Johnson and 94.7 Star pm personality Tyler Glen co hosted yesterdays morning show As part of a two Day Job sharing plan. Today Glen is the guest editor at the newspaper. His column will appear tomorrow. Colin Corneau Brandon us

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