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Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: January 11, 1962 - Page 1

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Location: Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin

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   Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - January 11, 1962, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin                                "Wisconsin A c cTtT Daily Tribune E W S PAPER Forty-Eighth Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, Thursday, January 11, 1962 Single Copy Ten Cents Kennedy Offers Massive Legislative Program largest in County Hearing on Attachments To City School District Set 11 Miners Perish in A public hearing will be held next Wednesday night on a petition calling for the largest school attachment __in terms of number of pupils and valuation in the history of Wood County. The hearing, to be held at the Court house auditorium here starting at 8 p.m., will be conducted jointly by the Wood and Portage County school committees. Involves 1670 Pupils Proposed for attachment to the Wisconsin Rapids district is territory having an equalized valuation in 1960 of There are about pupils in- volved and the area is lllV-i CARTERVILLE, 111. (AP) i square miles in size. Orlandi, director of the Illinois Mines and Mineral Department, said 11 miners trapped in a small coal mine 168 feet be- low the surface were found dead early today. He said the bodies were found by rescue teams which had j been seeking to locate the men for several hours. Orlandi said the bodies would be brought to the surface after the mine has bsen ventilated. Rescue workers had described the bottom of the shaft as "murky and filled with smoke and debris." operating a high school by July 1 of this year, as required by the new redistricting law. Districts Listed Districts or parts of districts to the proposed for attachment to the h o o 1 j Wisconsin Rapids district are listed below along with the equa- lized valuation as of 1960, the Paper Firm's Troubles Used By Agitators mn ca s giant cui yui ttuuiia, was ic- They said poisonous carbon, mo-, l more gas was present m the g jn credit ne j operations by top officers of a Orlandi said that "all of the; Brazilian subsidiary, miners trapped have becn ac- j And an astonishing twist to counted for .and they all are; the siluation- it was .said, discov- deacl." ery 0[ the purported fraud set off A member of the rescue team; a vicious attack against St. Regis said the men apparently were! by anti-American factions in killed instantly by explosion. The Brazil. cause of the blast was not deter- j Press Accounts mined immediately. Miners at the j scene said compressed r used for underground blasting and accounts that dynamite and other exnlo-1 PubllMlcd accounts sives were not used. Approval of the petition would complete all attachments to lhe new Wisconsin Rapids S c District as outlined in the coun- ty's redistricting master plan. That plan is aimed at placing all j number of pupils and the amount lands in the county in a district Of land: Jt. School Dist. No. 1, village of Biron and town of Grand Ra- pids in Wood County and the towns of grant and Plover in Portage County, including the Biron, Children's Choice, Wash- ington and Pearl Schools. Equa- lized v a 1 u a t i o n is there are 663 pupils involved, and there are 30V2 square miles of land. NEW YORK (AP) The St. Jt. School Dist. No. 4, towns of Paper Co., one of Ameri-1 S e n e c a and Hansen, operating ca's giant corporations, was re- the Altdorf School; valuation: 33 pupils, and square miles. Jt. School Dist. No. 1, village of Vesper and towns of Hansen Sigel and Arpin, operating the Vesper Elementary anc 27 square miles. Jt. School Dist. No. 2, town o Grand Rapids, operating the Grove, Woodside and Two .Mile Schools: valuation 656 pupils, and four square miles. School Dist. No. 2, town of Saratoga, operating the Bell, McKinley and Columbia Schools; valuation; 116 pupils, and 27'i square miles, not counl- ing a portion of the district re- 7 01 the com- j pany situation, gave this report: Asks Special Powers in Tax, Tariff Fields; Aid fo Scfioofs is Proposed WASHINGTON (AP) President Kennedy asked for unprecedented tax-cutting and tariff-slashing powers in laying before Congress today a massive legislative pro- gram he described as keyed to "fulfill the world's hope by fulfilling our own faith." And, in a State of the Union message, the young President surprised many legislators by calling vigorously for multi-billion-dollar federal aid to public schools and for civil rights legislation. Many had developed the notion that the ad- ministration would soft-pedal these issues this year. "The right to vote should no longer be arbitrarily denied through such in- iquitous local devices as literacy tests and poll Kennedy declared. Wrapped up in his report on how the nation stands and what is needed were many well-anticipated requests for creation of a new Cabinet-level Department of Urban Affairs, for higher postal rates, for a new farm program. Details on most of these were left for elaboration in later special messages. I Sounding a note of urgency, Kennedy called for crucial deci- Tragedy in Peru sions quickly at this moment 1 when he said a united Europe i flourishes and Communist unity falters. Prepared for Action "While no nation has ever faced such a challenge, no nation has ever been so ready to seize the j burden and glory of the President said. He pledged America to "talk when appropriate, and to fight, if Fear Avaianche Has Killed 3000 LIMA, Peru (AP) A giant avalanche of snow and water caused by a thaw roared down on the town of Ran- to preserve a free j rahica mid several ranches in northwestern Peru Wed- Bcrlin. and he hinted at a coming reorganization of the fighting forc- nesday night. Authorities said they feared between and 4.000 to bolster a military stance Persons lost their lives. OUTSTANDING Wisconsin Rapids Junior Chamber of Commerce Wednesday night honored Karl Schiller, left, Rt. 2, Pittsvillc, as South Wood County's outstanding young farmer. Presenting Schiller with a trophy at a banquet is Harold Knanf, right, chairman of the Jaycees outstanding farmer committee, while Jerry Cournoycr, Jaycee president, looks on. Tribune Staff Photo 200 miles northwest of Lima and 'Outstanding Farmer7 Title Won by Schiller Karl Schiller, 26, Rt. 2, Pitts-1 ville, and Robert Gardner, nomi- ville, was named South Wood I nated by Burt Iverson, also of which he said has steadily im- proved in the past year. The President's theme was an appeal for freer commerce with the rising European Common Market and shared growth with Latin America and the whole free world. Kennedy proposed "a bold new instrument of American trade pol-! have been wiped out. j rewriting of the trade Population of agreements act to let him gradu- ally wipe out some tariffs entirely and reduce others by 50 per cent. I Anticipating the age-old debate between protectionists and propo- up The avalanche rushed clown the Huascaran Mountains, ripping Irces, crushing farm houses and sweeping aside livestock in its was spread over a front of more destructive path. Ilha" seven milcs- Huaraz, the nearest major town, The village of Ranrahica. about sccne Q[ a simjlar djs> r t-lt I L miles north of the commercial avalanche dammcd center ot Huaraz, was feared to i "The company's prompt efforts The blast occurred shortly after: IQ the whole bitter truth 6 p.m.. about two hours after the; of a purdy intcrna] mattcr has men entered the mine, which is; becorne, lh' focus for charges in located in a rural area SD miles, segmcnts of the Brazilian press southeast of St. Louis. The mine am] lcgjsiature of an 'imperialist operated by the Blue Blaze Coal; against the proietariat. Co., was opened about six months j Uvisting fact and logic, ago. anti-American factions link St. The explosion shot twisted steel; ReRJS wRh ev and cur- and debris out of the shaft open- j rcnt busincss scandal. ing. breaking the windshield ot a ,.Thc papermaker is described parked auto. Heavy smoke poured; as an 'octopus' stran- out at first, keeping rescue teams Rling Loca] and fcderal are tjed in wilb the fabri. from entering the mine Claude Jcntry owner of lhe mining -arier.-Muc..j caicd-ptot and the cry" to seize all firm, said; Arncrican interests in Brazil has it appeared the explosion occurred becn more than oncc_ at the bottom of the shall. wrecked the tipple building which' The Herald Tribune said the sit- uation "threatened to become a County's most outstanding young farmer by the Wisconsin Rapids Junior Chamber of Commerce at a banquet at the Rocket Club Wednesday night. Runncrs-up in the contest were Donald Dicrs, who was nomi- nated by Edward Urban, Pitts- Hear Magir! Case Friday The case of Robert J. former Wisconsin Rapids police Pitlsville. justice charged with misconduct All three winners, who were j in office, will be called for hear- fcled at the banquet, live within j 'ng in Circuit Court here at 2 I xhc chief executive, beginning The town has a population of about 3.000, and police said about i aster in December 1941, when an river broke through its barrier and cost the lives of 4.000 persons. Ice forms in gigantic propor- tions during the winter in the Andes. Avalanches often occur in the summer when the equatorial ncnls .said: and reduce others by w> per cent. lhat were missh Anticipating the age-old unconfirmea roport said loosens masses of snow and 11 of free trade, Kennedy "Our decision could well af- fect the unity of the West, the i course of the cold war and the I growth of our nation for a gen- cralion or more to come." Goal Is Peace Adjournment Vote Is Expected in Legislature MADISON (AP) Wisconsin's mcnt resolution that needs only a 10 miles of one another. I'-111- A panel of judges, qualified Herbert J. Stcffcs. Milwau- in lhe field of agriculture, scruli-1 kce. presiding, nizccl nominations last Saturday. Originally scheduled to Friday, with Municipal his second year in office small mountain lake was pushed ice that tumble into deep, nar- from its banks, flooding the canyons, forming temporary rounding area. Meager information from the scene said enormous ice chunks were torn from the side of Mt. Huascaran, a peak, highest in Peru. lakeu. A telephone call from Yungay, a hamlet near the crest of Huas- caran, broke lhc first news of the catastrophe at Ranrahica. Then communications were cut, when lines were 1961 Legislature was expected to j mark its first anniversary date today with a long-awaited vote for adjournment. official. The resolution includes a provi- sion that would allow the Asscm- Schiller, also nominated by Ur- ban for the honor, has been farming on the family homestead since 1953, when he went into partnership with his father. In 1956, he became manager of the farm. Stresses Quality Maintaining a Grade A dairy ft barn and equipment, Schiller has buill up a herd of 95 callle, 52 of Ihem milking. The young ibly speaker and the Senate prcsi- housed the elevator mechanism; .callsc for Communist and machinery used to coal from gondola cars unload Pfane Miles impcrilin MADKIO. Spain new: workers. U.S. B52H supcrbombcr roared; into the Torn-Jon airba.se near Madrid today after a record- smashing flight from Okinawa without refueling. The plane and its eight-man Air Force crew headed by-Maj. Clyde T. Evely. of Petersburg, But with individual patience and j denl pro lem tf) rccall lhe law. enthusiasm rubbed thin since the j makers ally timc prior to Dec. 10_ Jan. 11, 1961 opening, the move toward winding things up resem- bled a ramble more than a rush. To make ready for the adjourn- ment motion, both houses moved through stacks of unfinished busi- and nationalist agitation." The Times quoted Homer Craw- ford, secretary of the parent com- pany in New York, as saying the affair had stirred up charges in Brazil's left-wing press that St. Regis was trying to seize the j troiied session would or would not j 1TqucsUs from mil- country's paper industry and was scl a mark for longevity. aid Though party politics molded nes, Wednesday, personal expressions on the sub- j R a day for jcct, there was recorded support i About a dozcn wcre for contending the Republican con-jdumped jn (hc As.scmbiy> case is now to be heard by Steffcs I pendent slates." VL-U- m oiiiL-u .u a The ice mellcd, and at p.m. presumably beset with the hazard i Wednesday a great mass of ice broken by the slide. )hic war pitched U.S.'snow and water broke loosc come! foreign policy to "the goal of a rumbled like thunder down the 1 fe and indc.i mountain and crashed onto lhe j agricultural community below. without a jury. The charges, filed against Ma- But he declared the obligation fulfill the world's hope by ful- girl in December. IIIGO by Mor- filling our own faith" begins at the jobs of paper On the basis of actual working to Lhc and aboul However, time to date, the 159 days of Scn- Involved ale deliberations lied a record set Crawford said, no by the 1959 session. But the KiO 1 one been dismissed except two top officials and two or three of their associates. The two key officials fired were Assembly meetings fell two short of the total posted in the previous session. Changing the comparisons to identified by the newspapers as j include weekends and holidays, John F. McLain, 40. the American the 1961 session's present total of in additional school aids. Compromise Move One stumbling block was re- moved with a compromise en- farmer stressed quality, not quantily, in his dairy production, increasing the butlcrfat average per cow from 325 pounds to 426 pounds. Schiller was the first in bis area to install a portable pipe- line milk transfer unit for Grade A milk, and uses a bulk feeding setup. He keeps a complete set of Dairy Herd Improvement Assn. records, as well as health and breeding records, on the herd. Modern feeding, breeding, i and disease control practices also j are in use on the Schiller farm. Doubles Crop Acreage Operating a 440-acre farm, Schiller has doubled lhe acreage gan L. Midthun, district attorney at that lime, involve alleged fail- ure by the police justice to report and remit to the city treasurer all fees, costs and forfeitures re- ceived by him; failure to forward certificates of conviction in mov- ing traffic violations to the State Dopiit'trrfrmt; fail- ure to file certificates of convic- tion with the clerk of Circuit Court, and failure to properly maintain his court docket. home. And lo strengthen the It sped to the edge of the Santa River and smashed into Ranra- hica. sion. Kennedy came out as vigorous- ly as he did in for federal 7 reports the disaster. ac- cf! Communicalion lines were dc- royed in lhc deadly swalh, ham- j nation s i J he advocated a .six-part! rescue and a program that included standby jcuratc rcports lhe exlciu authority both to lower personal income taxes and to pump federal money into public works if neces- sary to meet lhe threat of reccs- Natives Sight Portions of Death Yacht MIAMI. Fla. of the bloody mystery yacht Blue- belle may be lying on a Grand _ The first news reaching Lima! Bahama beach 75 miles Half-Mile Wide just after midnight said the ava-. lEndic was more than half a mile "urthwes ,of the craft went down with most of a V, isconsm wide and 12 yards deep. Other reports, received by radio iin Key West, Kla., said the slide nicipal employes. Passed by both houses, larging bargaining powers for mu- per crop since 1953, until he now i tills about 264 acres. Using ap- Ihe proved soil conservation and Regis Brazilian subsidiary. Bates ord of 270 set in 1939. do Brasil, S.A.: and the general! manager, Dilcrmando Macliado, a Brazilian. Ilcurn Date Doc. 10 The figures will be in for an- other shuflling Dec. 10. That's the Ul 1HJI .MKIl I ItllU McLain was described as a dalfi carricd on adjourn. graduate of the U.S. Naval Acad- allccl cmv nlc of four children plane named tie." Aviation experts the flight a potent example of j anj an official Of me Bates con- thc new plane's ability to deliver ccnl since joining it in 1953. a cargo of nuclear-armed mis- j There was no immediate com- silcs almost anywhere in the company or the world. i two men. The huge, Boeing supcrbnmber j St. Regis was reported to have 1 horses perished had been lhc air 22 hours and j requested a police investigation j when a barn on the Theodore j Five proposals for reapporlion- 10 minutes and had .spanned two jn Brazil, placed the subisidary; strub farm, three miles north-; ing the state's political districts oceans and the North American j in "preventive i cast of here, was swept by fire on the basis of I960 census fig- continent when Kvcly set it down opened legal proceedings in fed- Wednesday afternoon. lures' were returned to their on the base's 15.000-foot runway, j oral court and filed recovery; strub made no estimate of loss, ;sombly authors. Barn Burns, Two Horses Perish Board shall the slate's labor laws rather than Va.. broke the old world distance j vicc in of lhc SI J 272 days topped lhc previous Employment mark of I1.235.fi miles without re-i fuclinq. 11 had been hold through' the first 15 years of the jet age by a propolier-driven U.S. Navy .....Truculent Tur- mcasure provides that lhc Wis-1 ASCS practices, he has nearly Relations doubled the yield per acre, administer Married and the father of four children, Schiller is .Sunday the courts. that the WERB act as mediator in employe dis- putes and unfair labor practice The board also would have au- thority to hold elections to deter- mine bargaining agents for public employes. And contracts accepted by a municipality and its workers could be binding bul not of more than one-year duration. school superintendent, and a member of the finance committee and church council at St. John's Lutheran Church, Pitlsvillc; is a fi-ycar member of lhe church Waltlicr is its treas- urer and zone president, and is treasurer of the church Men's Club. Schiller is a director of 7 the 4 Candidates File Nomination Papers the longest in Western Europe. Conway Appointment Confirmed by Senate MADISON The appoint- ment of Francis J. Conway of Thorp as a mrmhor of the State Banking and Review Board was confirmed by the Wisconsin Sen- ale today. The vote was 1R-11, with Republicans registering the objections. Conway succeeds .Stuart V. Willson of Kau Claim and will serve a five-year lerm. claims bonds. under existing Consolidated to Pay 35-Cent Dividend A dividend of 35 cents per share for the firsl quarter of 1962 was declared by the board of direc- tors of Consolidated Water Power Paper Co. at a meeting here Wednesday. The most com fidelity lbul ti10 barn was prchcnsivc plan in the package' Nomination papers have becn along with lhc horses and about! would have increased Milwaukee i hY candidates for i bales of hay. Twenty-two! County's Assembly representation head of callle w'ere saved from from 24 to seats and given the burning sti'uclurc. iWaukcsha County four instead of The fire spread to a machine two assemblymen, shod and threalcned other out- i Two legislative fices lo be filled in lhc Apr municipal election. City Clerk Ko bcrt 0. Boyarski reported today. Filing for reelection were Mrs Nancy Gilbert, a member of tin commit-1 Board of Education; Earl W buildings and the farmhouse, but: tecs charged with furthering ward alderman. Arpin volunteer firemen brought ficicncy -m% .stale government H Peterson, 9th Ward su the under control before further damage occurred. Firemen believe the h 1 a e The dividend is payable Feb. 28! started about 3 p.m. when clcc-! ficd in floor debate as a stockholders of record at the lineal wiring in the barn short- live "watchdog" to see lo close of business Feb. 13. i circuiled. would be created by measures passed by the Senate. One of the groups was identi- Leg is! a- that dc- 7 pcrvisor. The fourth nominee is Henr P. Baldwin, who is running fo the 3rd Ward supervisor posl be ing relinquished by Frank D Abel. MARCH OF of the Wisconsin Rapids Jayccttcs arc helping prepare material for the current Mnrt-h of Dimes fund campnign, which will continue through January. Left to right above are Mrs. (Jerald Coiirnoyer, a Jaycette; Mrs. Edward director of the Wood County drive, and Mrs. Francis Ncihaucr, also a Jaycettc. In the foreground is 10-year-old Frederick Paul Jr., 2611 2nd St. S., who has received assistance from the National Foundation. family. The Coast Guard said it would investigate reports received Wed- nesday from several sources that .sea-wise natives near Freoport, Grand Bahama, believe a deck section, some canvas and exhaust i equipment came from the BU-toot ketch. The Coast Guard has never closed its book on the Nov. 12 disappearance of the Fort Lander- dale yacht chartered by Arthur Duperrault of Green Bay. Wis., for a family vacation cruise. Only one of seven who sailed on the Bluebellc's lasl voyage sur- vivx-.s Dupcrrault's 11-year-old j blonde daughter. Terry Jo, unex- j pcctcdly found on a lifcraft three clays after the yacht vanished. j There was briefly one other sur- Capf. Julian Harvey, 45. He committed suicide less than 24 hours after learning of Terry Jo's rescue. Before he cut his wrist in a motel, Harvey told the Coast Guard at Miami a squall had dis- masted the Bluebclle, that fire broke out and all ing some into tha sea to escape the flames. Terry Joe said she saw no fire, smclled no smoke and saw no masts broken only leaning. She said also that she saw her mother and brother lying on a bloody deck and was slapped and ordered below by Harvey, who later told her the ship was sink- ing and disappeared. Victims of the Bluebclle were Mr. and Mrs. Duperrault: their son, Brian, 14; daughter Ronee, 8; and Harvey's wife, Mary, 34. Wisconsin Weather Cloudy, windy and warmer tonight with light mow sprtading over all of state tonight. Friday mostly cloudy, chance of snow flurries north. Warm- er south. Low tonight 8-15. High Fri- day mostly In the 50s. Local weather facts for 24-hr, pe- riod i a.m.: Max., 2 mln., II below.   

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