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Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: September 21, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune

Location: Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin

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   Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - September 21, 1954, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin                                TIIK WKATIIKH tor (uiilKl't flBurlnir ttiul front imu-li portion tonlithi. liH-U for 24 mln. 41. IT.iclpltutlon Single Copy rOftBCARf WlftCONMN IM-IOW Normal WRXMiiMM W i 14 inuth, Normal minimum 41 jouth. Cool Ifcrmuh HuiuUf, Wmlmwdny Mid .15 lut'h or nouthWMt M ur frltUjr. Wfocoiwln Win., Somber 15 Praying Chaplains Hit Silk Land Safely As Big Plane Crashes Crewmen Also Bail Out of Transport NEWHALL, Calif. UP) Praying as they parachuted in shirtsleeves, 15 chaplains landed safely before minutes their disabled Air Force plane crashed and burned yester- day. The three crewmen also bail- ed out successfully. "You can be sure there was plenty of praying going said the Rev Lertis R. Ellett of Lawn- dale Calif., Church of Christ, who wearing back parachutes and had )cen briefed before take-off but none of the ministers had ever jumped before. Minutes alter the departure, smoke began trailing from the CMC. Vibration was felt in the ship, then the right engine caught Meredith and Sgt. Plew fire. As. Lt. carried the pilot's instructions to the chaplains to bail out at about feel, the right engine fel away. Mr. Von Norman, a CAP trans- Over- the air livestock as monkeys, pigs and is an Air Force reserve colonel. "This was an occasion when doubly, we were practicing what e preach; namely, saic Rev. Neville E. Carlson of llmore, Calif. "Lord With Us" "The Lord was with us in many ways, even to the fact that the lire in one engine was on the right side of the plane and the door through which we jumped was on the said the Rev. Bertil Von Norman of the West Hollywood Presbyterian Church. The group of Civil Air Patrol chaplains from Southern Cali- fornia left Burbank at p.m. in the C4G, bound for a regional CAP chaplains' conference at Sacramento scheduled for last night and today. The plane crew included the pilot Capt. Thomas E. Willson, North Highland, Calif.; Lt. Earl W. Meredith Jr., Sacramento, and Sg'l Lloyd Plew, Globe, Ariz., all stationed at McClelland AFB, Sac- ramento. The chaplains and crew were major, was credited by his col leagues with calm heroism as he helped the chaplains adjust their 15 Smelly 20 Win Pay Increase LONDON -Twenty Hrillsh iiirline pilots have won a puy raise put it frankly 1 they stink. The Iliers man freight ports used by the British seas Airways Corp. for shipment of such racehorses, attic. Denis Fellows, a spokesman for the British Airline Pilots Assn., told a wage tribunal Mon- "These men take their meals while flying in degrading and obnoxious conditions. Their bodies are so contaminated by the ever-present smell of animals that when they come in contact with thi.'ir fellow men, they are shunned." The smelly 20 asked for a pay hike of one pound hourly. The tribunal awarded them seven shillings Western Allies Study French Plans to Rearm West Reich Criticism Under Attack AFL Ignores LOS ANUELKS WUSecreury of Labor. Plea From Ike's Labor Chief AFL Convention. mollify steady barrage Cranberries Hit by Hail; Frost Threat A brief but vicious hailstorm knifed through the Wisconsin Rauids area Monday night, caus- ing some damage in Biron cran berry marshes but sparing other county cranberry growing areas Hailstones the size of moth fell during a five-minute period shortly after 7 p.m. They knocked some nearly- ripe cranberries from their vinos and bruised others, causing dam- age estimated by Leo Sorenson of ing opposition to the GOi Fleming Case Presented to Army Court No Official Reaction to New Proposal and hinted that organized labor could get more of what it wanted by not being so hostile. "I am disturbed when you criti- cize Mitchell said. "In the past 20 months we have ac- complished much for the work- ing men and women of America, and I can pledge to you that we will continue to do so. "But I would like to suggest that if we were as confident of your support when we are right as we are of your criticism when 11-officer Army court we are wrong, we would be today in the began de- case of we s, more effective in your behalf." Lt. Col. Harry Fleming, the The 750 delegates listened to first American officer to face a Mitchell in complete silence and courl.martial for behaviour in a gave him a politely warm but of war camp. tions and promised "the apprai- years sal will be completely 15 lair. Censure Verdict' Is Expected on Monday WASHINGTON -Senators nvestigating censure charges against Sen. McCarthy (R-Wis) said today they hope CITY SAFETY certificate honoring the city for The city's last pedestrian death occurred May 30, U47. UriD une Stall Photo) Wisconsin treasurer Cranberry lion, at 5 Rapids, of the secret ary Wisconsin Gem Theft Is Reported in Superior AFL President George Meany! haired, sat impassively as Lt. said afterward that the conven-Col. John R. Pritchard, the prose- tion would "pass judgment" on cutor, charged that Fleming's the administration in its resolu- main determination during three in captivity was to .sur- ivive, without regard to the ,means or consequences. "Col. policy must be found wanting and Col. Fleming must be found guilty" he said. Fleming's defense summation Monday was that he was a kind- ly leader who did his best for Allied war prisoners under his command at a North Korean prison camp. Fleming's wife, Gladys, and LONDON -F r u n c e'.s Western Allies took a long, cautious look today at new phm to rearm to hand SUPERIOR (M-Authorities are atiempting to trace the identity car and drove to the next Jewel- of a 1954 Oldsmobile that police believe figured in a dia- down their "verdict" Monday. What the special six-man com- mittee may report to the Senate remained a tightly guarded sec- ret. Sen. Ervin a commit- tee member, said in an interview he now expects the report to be made public Monday, instead of on Thursday of this week as the committee had planned tentative ly. Another member, who declmec 1o be quoted by name, the new target date. Ervin said a report that earlj ought to bring the Senate back into session to consider it on Oct 1 "or very soon thereafter. Sen. Jackson who is not on the special committee, said in a separate interview I nor would he announce any speci- ic date "We'd week if he said. In California, Senate Repubh- Leader Knowland said he Growers Associa-, monci robbcry of a jewelry sales- 10 per cent of the to crop in areas hit. Similar damage occurred in the ITayward area bogs, Sorenson said. A hailstorm pounded vines there Monday afternoon. Not in Cranmoor The highly localized storm did no damage in the Cranmoor area, according to Sorenson. Although the harvest has not hcgun on most Biron marshes, many growers flooded the bogs today, floating loose berries to the top where they could be scooped up. This salvage opera- tion may reduce the crop loss on Hie approximately 200 acres af- fected. A string of thunderstorms flashed across the state Monday night, according to the Associated man Monday. Police Chief Arthur Buchanan said the diamonds were stolen from the trunk of a car be- longing to Ray V. McCombs, Min- neapolis, a salesman for a firm in New York City. McCombs told Buchanan a black car followed him from Min- neapolis to Ilinckley, Minn., while press. They were ot colder weather a forerunner predicted for on his way here to visit a jow- owner. He said he elry store didn't know the precious stones were missing until he called at there was pried open. were ommittee chairman, declined tolhis daughter Patricia were in ,ay whether he has informed any the courtroom Senate leader of a target up its as case the Army against the officer. for the report. like to see it done this can NKVV CLUB AOKNT Jim Everts, 24-year-old University of Wisconsin graduate, is the new 4-H Club agent in Wood County. He took office Monday, filling the vacancy created by the promotion of Louis Rosan- dick to assistant county agent. Everts was raised on a Wau- paca County farm. (Tribune Staff Photo) There are four charges against Fleming, all charging that he collaborated with the enemy. If convicted, Fleming would face a minimum penalty Candidates File Financial acks any clue to when the discharge to of dishonor- a maximum will be summoned back of life imprisonmen Washington. He said he hasn't yet heard from Watkins and that chard contended he hasn't been in touch ate Democratic Leader Johnson of Texas. May Recall Them When the Senate ended its regular session last month, it au wrized Knowland and Johnson cting jointly, to recall senators !camp commander, shot no _ _.-_! -r-r 1 J-1-.n f Y" Candidates in the primary election have _-_ his closing argument, Frit- finandal statements at the of- _ i____1 J 4-Un4- "4-Vl-a t _ 1___1 ates in me Sept 14 ;h election have filed final Both hoi- West many. Two leading British news- papers termed It at least a start- ing point for the nine-power talks opening in London next week. There was no immediate offi- cial reaction to the proposals, outlined by French Premier PI- ,erre Mendes-France yesterday in ,a speech before the European [Consultative Assembly at Stras- bourg. They included tieing West Germany in a tight European al- liance that would limit the fight- ing forces of all member states and control their arms produc- tion. Studied in U. S. In Washington, a State De- partment spokesman said the French plan is being studied but no comment would be made im- mediately. A few hours later the United States formally accepted Britain's invitation to attend the Sept. 28 London talks, called to thresh out a way to enlist West Germans in Western defense. Prime Minister Winston Churchill called his Cabinet to its regular weekly session today. The discussion was expected to center around Mendes-France's plan and arrangements for the nine-power conference. The French data to interested governments giving full details of Mendes-France's proposals was still secret. The first Brit- ish comment appeared in the in- fluential, independent Times and the Conservative Daily Tele- he hasn't been in touch with Sen-1Of bodily harm Lyndon supported by the what went on war camp." "The fear of being that "that fear oi the COUnty clerk cover simply is expenses incurred in the or ..__.------ campaign. evidence rimary at the prisoner of Thg amount 'by the Republican 1 Committee, Emil Mueller, shot was spent Voluntary secre- Point newspapers said the French Premier had furnished at least the basis for possible agree- ment. Bui both expressed misglv- ings as to the extent ry store. It was then he opened the trunk and found the jewelry missing. Police said whoever opened the trunk must have had a key, since no evidence it was They said two cases stolen, containing 280 dia- mond and wedding rings, a few loose cut and unmounted dia- monds and several solitaires. McCombs represents the J. W. Wood Sons, Inc., a wholesale firm, which placed the value on the lost stones. understand there is a good possi- bility we will be called back Oct. or Oct. 3." Sen. Watkins the the store. hap- tonight, when frosts in low areas arc expected. Temperatures Monday were 6 11 degrees below those of Sunday and the lowest of the day was 62 at Superior. ol Weather By midnight the storms had Mown themselves right out of the state and the downright cool weather was in control. The low- est reading was 39 al Grants- burg and Park Falls. Milwaukee with the highest minimum of -17, had its coolest night of the sea- son. Other lows were: Superior 40; Kan Claire and Wausau -11; Two Rivers 42; Green Bay 43; LaCrosse, Lone Rock and Madi- son 45 and Beloit 47. Rainy and cool weather was Ihe story over wide sections of the Midwest today as well as the West while summer continued its late visit in the South. The Da- kotas and Montana had readings below The Gulf Stales and those on the southern Atlan- tic shore were in Ihe 70s. This is what apparently pened, McCombs said: He had lunch at the Superior Hotel grill with Frank Germann of the Germann Jewelry store, Superior, his first stop in the city. (Frank Germann is a former Wisconsin Rapids resident and the son of Mrs. Selina Bevin.O. McCombs said he returned to the store to get his sample case, left there for safekeeping, and put it in Ihe trunk of his car. Then he remembered that he had failed to pny the luncheon check and returned to the hotel, a short distance away to pny it. When he returned, he got in the Defends Move On Farm Curb WASHINGTON Secretary Recount Asked For by Hoerl Notices of petition for a re- count of ballots in the North Wood County Republican Assem- bly race were served on County Clerk J. A. Schindler today by Howard Woodside, attorney for Donald Hoerl. According to the official tally made by the board of county can- vass Hoerl lost the GOP nomina- tion to John S. Crawford by five votes in Tuesday's primary elec Anderson, Larkin Will Speak Here Kenneth Anderson, Stevens Point Democratic nominee for congress from the 7th District, and Edwin Larkin, Eau Claire, Democratic candidate for lieuten- ant governor, will speak at a meeting of Pulp Sulphite Workers Local 94 at the Labor Temple tonight. Larkin will also make a radio speech over WFI1R which has been tentatively set for 7 of Agriculture Benson said today tion Botn are Marshfield attor politics played no part in his deci- sion last week to case farm pro- duction controls next year. The secretary told a news con- ference he wished to emphasize that because there had been re- ports that his decision was in- fluenced by Republicans concern- ed about the farm vote in the November congressional elec- tions. His action was taken, Benson said, without any discussion with President Eisenhower, White House aides or any administra- tion political leaders. The secretary announced last neys. Schindler said he would con vene the canvass board at 9 a.m Wednesday at the Courthouse to begin the recount in the 30 North Wood County precincts compris ing Assembly District No. 1. In their post-election canvass the board members checked onl> Alderman, Rodeo Hand Injured in 2 Accidents Two men were treated at River view Hospital Monday for injur- ies sustained in separate acci- dents. Alderman Harold Zager, 50, 1G20 Oak St., received a broken right wrist in an accident at the Hiron Division of Consolidated Water Power Paper Co. Com- pany officials said 7-ager's hand accidentally slipped between the oscillating rolls of the coaler seo- of a paper machine. He re- nlnerl at the hospital today. Perry Kirk, Watibny, S. D., p.m, tonight. The- candidates spent most of today campaigning in Marathon County. Wednesday they will go from Wisconsin Rapids to lola, Weyauwcga and Fremont. Thurs- day's itinerary includes Berlin, Green Lake and Markesan, with in evening meeting at Adams. Friday the nominees will cam- the accuracy of the vote tallie: made by local election officials Individual ballots will be re counted now. The South Wood County Re publican Assembly race was dc favor o Wednesday removal of restric- tions on use of upward of 40 mil- in acres of land to be diverted from such surplus crops as cot- ton, wheat, tobacco, peanuts, rice and corn. At that time he said in a reply to a query, that there had been no political pressure for his action. Benson said his action was in- fluenced by a number of nonpo- litical factors, including the drought, a reduced corn crop, a new trade law designed to en- ided by 11 votes in Arthur J. Crowns Jr.. Wisconsii Rapids. The runnerup. Thoma W. McLean of Nekoosa, annount cd he would not ask a recoun here. wise is not supported by the evi- which reportcd receiving "an he said "Col Kim tbe and spending 294 16 pnce of British military commitments in Europe France might demand as the for consenting to German j.je caves, consider the special commit- ee's findings on a resolution by en. Flinders (R-Vt) to McCarthy for what the Vermont- r termed conduct unbecoming a cnator. A week ago Monday, the spe- ial committee of three Demo- rats and three Republicans fin- shed taking public testimonyon he case. They have been study- rig the matter behind closed oors almost daily since. When a reporter asked Wat- said the fear a place where were real, is exaggerated." one. "the of war punished, "while behalf of all Republican can- rearmament. tins to comment on reports the Committee would keep its find- ngs secret until the Senate meets, Watkins replied: 'I don't think that will be done." Work Shortage Continues Here Demand for male workers in the Tri-Cities area is still "run-iviclorious by five ning very according to Ro- had receipts on didates. i Donald Hoerl, Marshfield, un successful North Wood County GOP Assembly candidate, re- ported the largest individual spending. He received spent IS and still owes lln addition, the Hoerl for As- sembly Club reported receipts hex, of which was all spent on the campaign. John S. Crawford, Marshfield, The Times also questioned whQther Britain would accept the "'loss of national sovereignty ap- parently inherent in the pro- posals to control the sue of arm- ed forces and armament produc- The French plnn, put forward DEFENSE 15 votes over of and bert P Clarke, manager of the expenses of of the State North Wood County icandidate local district office Man Forfeits Bond On Tipsy Driving Count Chester W. Penny, 43, Rt. 1, Plover, forfeited bond Mon- day when he failed to appear in Morgan L. Midthun's court on a charge of while under the influence of toxicants. Penny was arrested by county police Sept. 12 in the town of Grand Rapids. Upon his plea ol innocent he was freed on bond Sept. 13. Employment Service. Noting that there is still a sur- plus of men in every employment 5144.30. category, Clarke said the active Arthur the The third Assembly Republican Urges Atomic Power Plants ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. on tne neoumican Thomas E Murray, a member of Iticket, Dick Greencway, town EncrRy Commission, Sherry, reported spending lhc rnounting ferocity J. Crowns Jr. of Wis- rf ,0, .ore now num. vvn-s 605. compared with 301 a bers year July. 605, compared and 696 at the end of (Wood spent ago Exactly 192 workers were plac- in jobs during Augusa con- in- ments in July. The drop, was mainly attributable to end of seasonal food processing 'Yankees, Move Over1 Is Lament in Brooklyn NEW YORK The Brooklyn Eagle, the faithful and oft-unhap- py hometown newspaper of the however, the The Wood The number of bean pickers, ostly children, placed during the season was up somewhat ,on from last season, Clarke They totaled figuring each person sent out each day as one placement. Unemployment compensation at the local ;t week in County assemblyman, compared with for Thomas W. McLean, who finished 11 votes VVoodrich, and owes said today of the H-bomb number needed catastrophe." has shrunk the for "total world spent Democratic of Party County, Mary Hnser, sec- said it received in and spent n outstanding expenses Dodgers, buried the 1954 Nation- offi numbered 105, compared with ogers, al League baseball pennant race rtuu'V me amer to- with this front page streamer to day: "Hey Yankees, Move Over.' The headline was framed in black. courage export of farm surplus- es, and the new farm law provid- ing for flexible farm price sup- ports. a member ol the troupe, suffered the forehead anil Mmpion Rodeo lacerations of lower lip and a simple fracture of Ihe nose when he was kicked by a horse during Monday night's performance at Witter Field. He was released aft- in rural areas of Waushara read Marquetto Counties. Action-Minded Burglars Shoulda Read the Book KXIRA, Iowa If these nur- Melon Theft Restitution Donated to Polio Fund MERRILL his melons den, Arvln thefts to the Two boys, Tired ol having stolen trom his gar- Oengcl H-portod the police. 13 and 14 were soon apprehended. Police gave dnd ordered lution. This gel was so pleased with the quick action he turned UK Money over Ihe boys a leelurr thorn to' make rest! done and Pofi cr .HRCHIVUr irculracnl al the the. Murcli oi Dimes. breakin at the vice would hav< profitable. Authorities n book, their Kxira Seed Ser been much more said the burglars broke- Into the seed store early Monday, puncluxl the safe and escaped with about in silver. Hut they threw aside a bank book which lifid in currency tuck between the III'lAVY TOM. K HONCi A Chinese merchant from Amoy estimates Nationalist attacks on that Com munist port have killed Ilei Chinese soldiers. Boy to Be Arraigned In Shooting of Father .1st week of August in the last week ol July 1954. For the entire area by the office, which in- cludes four counties, the figure for the last week in August was 141. 51 more than a month earlier and 258 below the August said.'additional John Zubella. town of Sigel .farmer who was the unopposed (Democrat Assembly candidate in North Wood County, received S1GT, and spent His conn- terpart in South Wood County, Arthur IT- Treutel, Wisconsin reported personal ex- of while the Bi- Treutel for Assembly received and Trent el's behalf, incumbent county Republicans, report- fro m noth- Unopposed STURGEON BAY Kenneth Walker, a 17-yenr-old boy in a family of 12 children, faced ar- aignment on an undetermined manslaughter charge today after telling authorities he shot his fa- ther to end abuse ol his mother. "1 am sorry I did it. 1 only wanted to stop the fighting." nelh wrote Monday in his statf ment. The youth, of nearby Kgg Harbor, was jailed Monday. Poor County Ally. Herbert .lohti- son quoted Kenneth as saying he killed his father, Howard, be- cause Ihe .15-year-old man was beating Kenneth's mother, the time. Two older sons are in military service. Romainc Londo, police chief for Sturgeon Ray, said the par- ,m unusual demand for clerical ents called for Frank Clarke anticipated that employ- men I in construction would pick up in the next 30 to 60 days, although he said the recent new construction work has not pro- duced too many jobs so far. In the last week there been and Ken-1 neth at a local bowling alley where they worked as pinsctters. He said the boys told him their parents had spent part of Sun- day afternoon in a tavern that an argument began way home. Londo q u o t ed Kenneth Frank as saying the fight (workers, chiefly for single girls who can type and do general of- fice work, Clarke said. and on the The father after a slug died from ten minutes a .12 gauge shotgun tore through his chest. Four terrified children witness oil the shooting. Ten of the Walk er's T2 children live nt home. Johnson said Mary, IS, Marvin, 15, Mnrlin, 12. and Frank, 10, saw Kenneth lire. Klvr oilier children, the young Ihrce-yearsvoid, were upstairs and tinned father at home, began to that beat when their the mo At Press Time IT.N. IN SICSSION penses ranging ing up to 'Hard Fight' Seen by Hall To prove to the world that such destruction is not the U. S. goal, he urged a stcpped-up effort by the federal government to de- velop practical electric power from the atom and help power- hungry areas of the world. He suggested a good location I for one ol the first such plants would be in Japan "the only land which has been engulfed in the white flame of the atom." Such a project, Murray said, "would demonstrate to a grim, skeptical and divided world that our interest in nuclear energy is not confined to weapons." Declaring that the United States has made little progress in the peacetime atomic Held, us compared to its advances in nu- clear weapons, Murray said in an address prepared for the annual convention of the CIO United Steel-workers: "If the U.S.S.R. should win the industrial power race, the pi ice tag for nuclear power rcacli.r.s vill be high. So high indeed th.'it he purchaser will he forced his birthrights for mi atomic powei. "This must happen i tragedy it would be If world eadership in tin-, field fell by de- fault into Soviet iMIld.s." DFNVFR (.I'1 Leonard Hall Republican national chairman president F.isonhower today prospects for contmuo.l GOP eon- Irol of Congress are "good, nut r.....__ H'lCVl that the party faces "a hard a and three key aides con frrred with the President at the N. Y. House for 90 mln demanded Ihe seating ofjnlos. They xvere ,omed (her they went upstairs to get the gun. When the pair returned, John- said, and when their father son Kril China in the Hulled Nations'howc r's chief (oritiy ami I he United States Adams, and promptly proposed that the issue liaison men with In- shelved for the remainder of IJW-I. Soviet Deputy Foreign Min- ister Andrei V. Vishinsky made nssislanl, Sherman reached across the table for Hieir mother, Kenneth fired, said Frank was on the stairs be- hind Kenneth at the time of the shooliMK. approximately 1 Police arrived, after Kenneth called from a neighbor's tele phone, only seconds after the fa- ther died. fiOnnUnn tionoriil Assembly ed Its ninth session. II. S. Dele- Kiite Henry t'ubol l.odne .Ir. Im- mediately made his eounior-pro and asked thai Ihe ASJM-III- My Rive It priority over tho VI- vhlnsky resolution. At a news conference after meeting Hall said lie and his us sistants had outlined the pollM cal picture to the President we see it." Hall added that "It H picture, but It is a Imi'l Today's political powwow carn< as the President m.'idr start n flying speeelimakinj; lour) of the Far West VV Krmnllii [linn- oyrltiirn irrn mil .Ir-I to lill into Wlulr. Kr.l Air I'Vrn itlnidy IIM inftre (ttiklnc 1 1 of id.- U..1? H fiM .-mum, wr nmtt hiv rrifnlnir Ovllun llf In jtAn N'm. nil I ivil (Wrriir PiiMtilirtt 
                            

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