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Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: July 7, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune

Location: Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin

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   Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - July 7, 1954, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin                                TIIK WKATIIKII For WlNuoiiNlii: MoHlly fulr tonight mid Thursday, tutuhir tonlKlit, ittattMiuit TliurNiluy. for 24 H.III.: Max. 7tt; niln. 5ft. Precipitation 1.04. i BLAftTRU IIY-UNKK May, iMfc- bock Muff writer. UU mid lu Ilnuwtw with KnlrKinn num. Mny wuntil nt Hit win homr iilirvlni rrn nfler a iky ruckvt IN Forty-First 12.487 WlncoiMln Rapids, July Single Copy Seven Oentt Ike Opposed to Letting Red China in U. N. But Hedges on Pulling Out WASHINGTON Eisenhower said today he is completely and unalterably opposed to letting Red China into the United Nations under present conditions. But he said he is not ready to say this country should withdraw from the U.N. if the Reds are admitted. Eisenhower thus took issue by implication Senate Leader Knowland of California and some other lawmakers who are urging United Stales withdrawal irom the U. N. if the Peiping government is admitted ovc American protests. At a news conference, the President also said a strike at the Oak Ridge Term., and Paducah, Ky., atomic plants would be a serious thing and would put the United States in a most embarrass- ing and difficult position Storm Damage Is Heavy in State Hoover Group to Get Data on CIA and Reds WASHINGTON UP) Sen. Me- with Republican Orlliy (R-Wis) says he will turn over to an arm of the Hoover Commission evidence he contends will show Communists have wormed their way into the Cen- tral Intelligence Agency. On his return yesterday from an 18-day vacation, McCarthy js fold newsmen "I would be glad" to supply this information about have said ance. Widely published reports have named them as Donald A. Surine and Thomas Lavenia. HUM Confidence WAUKF.GAN, 111. A truck! driver from Hrillion, Wis., lay, helpless for more than an hour in his truck after it overturned at an underpass flooded during Tuesday's storm. Karl liehnko, 33, pinned behind tho wheel, suffered a dislocated .shoulder, a broken arm and sev- Wind, Rain, Hail Do Half Million Damage MADISON W. Clark, Dane County agent, esti- mated today that Tuesday's heavy wind, rain and hail did a half a million dollars The storm hit 7 Injured as Tornadoes Hit In Southeast MADISON -Residents of a 100-mile stretch of south- eastern Wisconsin today fifi- ars damage to crops and fields in this area, ured up their property dam- it shortly after noon, doing most damage age in Tuesday's violent storm eral broken ribs. His release was near Cambridge and Sun Prairie. Winds were estimated to miles per hour, and nearly three He said, however, he has great hope the strikers will go back voik as a result of his action Tuesday night setting up an struck a few hours before the'the supersecret: espionage agency jhou.secleaning, a move McCarthy news conference, ignoring the possibility of a Taft- lo a Hoover Commission said he a fnrr-p" hoaded hv retired Gen. I n- .Jn unusual McCarthy said he had "com- because rescue workers velocity of near 100 mile unaho to plete confidence" in every T" T inches of rain poured down, nn tho J i gasoline clark said much corn and grain ater B on the ground was ruined. In adc smashed flat, and some there is need for a President Hartley law injunction. The President said he will proud to go before the in relation to the prices nd praise what Congress has'of goods he buys one at this session if the record proves to be as good as he ex- pects. Eisenhower described himself as delighted with the House's adoption of the flexible price sup- port principle in the farm bill. He said that although the bill wasn't exactly what he recom- mended, he regards its passage as a great and sweeping victory. Farm Measure The bill provides a flexible scale of price supports for basic crops ranging from to 90 per cent of parity, replacing the rigid 90 per cent supports of the present law. Eisenhower original- ly had asked for a flexible sys- tem ranging from 75 to 90 per cent of parity, a price calculated by the government as fair to the j force" headed Mark Clark. .Not Forgotten In response to a question, Ei- senhower voiced complete confi- dence in the integrity, loyally and efficiency of Allen Dulles, head of the Central Intelligence Agency and said the agency is un- der constant examination by the executive branch to see it does its work with honesty and de- cency. CIA and Reds Sen. McCarthy (R-Wis) has by retired Gen. "Perhaps it was an unusual Employment Increase Of Million Revealed WASHINGTON The gov- was ruined. In addition, fields were gouged arid gullied by torrents of rain, causing loss of valuable topsoil and washing away of fortilix.or. Many acres of corn also were lost by jdrowning, caused when water 'covers a field for a day or more. A hailstorm near Middleton Most Dane and Rock county farmers felt they were on their marked by a series of small tornadoes. At least seven persons were injured during the storm, as northwesterly winds struck at speeds up to 100 miles an hour. The storm multiplied its own crushing force by uprooting trees that toppled onto homes and cot- tages, down power and co-lncidencer that the ones said today emPloyrnent.slashcd corn Jeaves'and damagediyearSi but as more and more did not get clearance wore the increased bv near v one ta ___ ,_... way to one of their best corn telephone lines and blockaded He insisted this was not an who were increased by nearly one investigating from May to June and unemploy- g water filled low sections of the nounccment that his Senate In- Struve Hensel (assistant secre-'ment, contrary to the usual sea vestigations subcommittee was dropping plans he had announced previously for a probe of CIA. "We are not going to forget about the he said. tary of McCarthy said. Hensel has said McCarthy once conceded to him he had no basis for the original accusa- tions against the assistant see- However, he said that "We rotary. "Absolutely Mc- never conduct a parallel investi-JGarthy commented yesterday, gation" in a field being investi- gated by persons he trusts. He said he has confidence in Clark, former Far East commander who sonal pattern, showed almost no increase. Employment rose during the month, according to a joint an- nouncement by the Department of Commerce and the Depart- ment of Labor, [highways in Dane, Jefferson, jRork, Walworth, Waukesha, Ra- cine and Kenosha counties. Clark quoted one farmer as1 fields, a six.eable part of the crop Several Towns Hit saying: "I hope it doesn't rain again for a month." The agent commented: "When a farmer tells you that, you know he's really been satu- rated." would be lost. Tornadoes arlded their twisting And, as though the torrentialjdestructiveness in the town of rains that preceded and and north of Sun Prairie the heavy storm were not, in Dane County, at Cambridge, enough, a second squall line cd throngh the area with hail KAIN HEAVY added to the heavy rain. said the CIA is dangerously in- js now president of the Citadel, filtrated with Communists military college at Charleston, has been under preliminary inves- tigation by the McCarthy investi- gations subcommittee. McCarthy Tuesday night said he has offered to turn over his S. C. McCarthy, during the hearings into his dispute with Army offi- cials, said red infiltration of the CIA was one of the worst situa- information to a subcommitteejtions confronting the United of the Hoover Commission, CIA Director Allen W. 15 Council Votes to Buy Two New Squad Cars The City Council voted day night 15-5 to buy two to accept the public pro- cylinder Pontiac squad cars from Reiland Pontiac Inc. for a perty committee's recommenda- tion to buy 1he Pontiacs was then adopted 35-5, with the voting net price of but only after ]ineup exaclly rcvorsed. Dulles called that false and said he had asked McCarthy last Oc- tober for any information he had about- his agency, but never re- ceived a reply. Checked On CIA McCarthy's s u b c o m mittee started last year to inquire into some CIA operations, but Dulles blocked the investigation by re- fusing to let his employes testi- fy on grounds that security might be jeopardized. McCarthy met yesterday with considerable discussion on erits of buying vs. leasing. Imitted lease bids of perlDlrkSen (R.in and toM news. The Council also voted to later he had no immediate street flusher and put off Motor Sales to call a meeting to con- Tension Over Indochina Threat of War in Pacific Has Subsided Wisconsin Rapids' rainfall dur- ing  _ri.iH_il Aijv-.i 4-4- J 1-. 4-4- 4- ff vw 30 days a decision on a new am- ]uu] bid pcr month for sider what: to dc.about two staff Mendes.France said today hewill ment of men and supplies. bulance. Aldermen Ezra Macder and C. Fords. Herman Ristow, chairman of aids denied Defense Department i clearance to handle secret docu- say late spring thaws in Siberia! Capt. William F. Bonnell to "lly probably have softened t h e! to Mexico or be shot" Pierre ground too much for quick move- Fired Twice The pilot dug into his flight J. Perry led an unsuccessful ilhe committce, said his group had ments. fight to have the squad car pur- sludied the lease proposition! The subcommittee and the de- chase turned back to committee carefully. When Perry asserted for another month so that hc believed leasing would be tenance cost figures for thc past two years could be obtained to see if leasing the cars would be cheaper than buying them. Maeder's motion for referral was defeated 15-5. He was sup- ported only by Perry, Norman Dietrich, Arthur Wittenberg and Paul Suhr. Clarence Van Lysel's cheaper than buying, Rislow said the committee bolicvod trying 'the Pontiacs for a year would I give it an accurate basis for com- parison of costs which it did not now have. Cost Comparisons Ristow said that the Fords the police department had two years ago cost about 3 cents per mile to operate. He added that the Iludsons now in use cost much more than that, partly because the city garage could not service them properly and the dealer who sold them is now out of 15 partment have declined to name the two who were refused clear- Crash Victim Found Near Car COLOMA UP) A Monroe wom- an missing on an auto trip home from Wausau was found dead today beside her wrecked car along Highway 51 near this Wau- shara County town. Mrs. Ann Musselman, in her late 60s, was thrown or crawled from her car after it hit a sign post and a tree and came to rest in brush which obscurer! thc rir from view from the high- ay. Her chest had been crushed. Mrs. Musselman was found by a farmer who came out to j from an accident in 1952 when a Settle Anderson Case; County Jury Excused A damage suit scheduled to Americans had been taken to Negotiating For Release HEIDELBERG, Germany U. S. Army authorities here said today that negotiations for the return of seven American sol- diers held by the Czechs are be- ing carried on by the State De- partment in Washington. The sodiers, on leave, were ar- rested near Baernau by Czech Border guards July 4 as they strolled near the frontier "for a close look." German border police were ad- vised by the Czechs that the come to trial Thursday was set- tled out of court this afternoon and thc County Court jury has Police Commander. Emil Proiss said German efforts to ob- ,uiu uic L soldiers fell been excused from duty, Clerk of Courts Jasper C. Johnson an nouneed today. Tho case involved Flanard And- _ithrough after two meetings Tues- day on the border with the Tho Czechs had offered to ex- erson town of Dexter farmer ch o "An foV ThrW who claimed pormnnont mjtirios f w] a ask the National Assembly to had left rundown old farmhouse in sub- 15 Redeployment of Allied ground bag and whipped out his own forces in the Pacific is under volver. He fired twice. The youth approve the sending of draftees consideration> now tnat the lhreat i Raymond A. Kuchenmeister Jr., to reinforce French forces in In- Of war has lessened, it was re-'died an hour later at a hospital dochina if the Geneva negotia tions end in failure. The Premier also told the law- makers he would be leaving soon to take personal charge of the French delegation at Geneva. "I have already said that the reasons to hope for a favorable and honorable outcome are pres- he declared. "That is still my opinion today." The Premier told the Assem- bly there would be no means of assuring the safety of French soldiers already in Indochina if conscripts were not sent. Since the war started in 1947, all the fighting in Indochina has been done by French volun- teers, North African troops, and Foreign Legionnaires. The dis- patch of draftees to a combat zone was specifically forbidden by the National Assembly. ported. with bullet wounds in his right There was speculation that the hip and chest, six U.S. divisions now in Korea] "What could a guy asked 15 I the pilot later yesterday after he 0 tVio flirrVit tn Sf T.nlllS Two State Queens To Be at Cranboree brought the flight to St. Louis, where it stopped over briefly en route to Fort Worth, Tex., and Mexico City. Capt. Bonnell, a Clevelander, (said: The state's dairy and cherry "I had a maniac on my plane, blossom queens will appear in We had women and person at the sixth annual Na-, Thought It Was Joke tional Cranboree Sept. 17-19, gen- At first he thought it was a eral manager William Quinn an- joke, he said. "I asked the flight nounced today. engineer and copilot if they Mary Ellen McCabe of Lady-j who this fellow was. The fellow1 smith, chosen last month as 'it's none of your damn busi- in Dairyland, and Rita of Baraboo, who is Miss Wiscon- sin Cherry Blossom Queen and represents the state in the Miss Universe contest, have accepted invitations to the fall festival. Mendes-France reminded the A slight change in the invita- dcputies he has promised to re- sign unless he can bring an end tional drum and bugle corps con- 'He had a sawed-off pistol in his hand. I tried to kid him along. He had the gun pointed at my side. While sitting there I drop- ped my hand down into my bag and pulled out a Colt .38 which I keep there. test to be held Saturday night "1 got the gun out. Then the Movie Party For Soap Box Derby Drivers Wisconsin Rapids Soap Box Derby drivers will be guests at the Wisconsin Theater Friday at p.m. for a preview theater party that leads off a series of events in the final week before Derby Day. They will be shown the Rocky Marciano-Ezzard Charles heavy- weigh t cham- pionship fight film, plus a fea- tured thriller en- titled "Them." Derby Director Jerry Marx ad- vised those boys who have not received their rac- ing helmets to pick them up the day of the theater party. The days from now until July 17 when the 4th annual Soap Box Derby will be run off on Sara- toga "Sf. Hill will be filled for all Derby contestants. Marx s a i d. to the fighting by July 20. He Sept. 19, was decided upon by a'engineer thought of some the slate of activities hc also reminded them he has prom-j committee which met Tuesday, to turn on the switch and today: isod to take all necessary mcas-jThe group decided to invite follow to roach up and Frjday at ures in the meantime to corps which have never on. The follow did. I shot him ,tv n -f -m I F 1 I-... ._ n_J n C 4 1-. .-I Vl T-Trt I? 4 1 1 1 H 1 C711T1 i foi the safety of French forces on the scone. Wcst _ peared here before and the known to be of top caliber. I "He hip. He still had the gun.j at sagged a bit. I let him of at repair the smashed sign. A search for her began after she failed to arrive home Monday night. She had left Wausau Mon- day afternoon after visiting Miss Margaret Aultman there. tractor he was riding was struck by a car operated by Mrs. Mabel Strieker of Wisconsin Rapids. Johnson said that terms of the! settlement had not yet been an- nounced. Church School Workers Will Hold State Session in City A statewide Laboratory School lor Church School Workers will be held in Wisconsin Rapids July 25-31, it was announced today. Thc Wisconsin Rapids Ministerial Association at its meeting Tues- day, completed plans for the con- clave to be sponsored by the Wis- consin Council of Churches in co- operation with the Local Associa- tion. Director ot thc school will be Mrs. Stephen J. Lambright, Reedsburg. The Rev. liohort W. Kingdon is dean and Mrs. John Crook, registrar. The latter two are from Wisconsin Rapids. During the week of the school, Intensive I mining will he offered to teachers of nursery, kinder- garten, primary. Junior and In- termediate children. Teachers will jve an opportunity to observe fctunl demonstration classes taught during ouch morning of the week nnd to evaluate their teaching during the afternoon sessions. Touchers of each department age will bo led by exports, sever- al of thorn nationally recognized authorities in their fields. Some of these will bo Miss Mary Kdna Lloyd, Nashville, Tcnn., nursery Germany recently. The Army said it had no part in thc border meetings. Tho Army has not announced the names of the seven soldiers, a captain and six enlisted men from the medical department of an artillery battalion. school sessions leader, editor of children's publications for the Methodist Church; Mrs. William Luokovv, Chicago, kindergarten loader, director of children's work in the Methodist Rock Riv- Nekoosa Girl Is Hurt in Accident A Nokoosn girl was injured slightly about a.m. today when her car rolled over in a f _ after failing to negotiate a Mnrlono J. Koohn 19. old vv or Conforonoo; Mrs. A. J. Ksor, she was traveling Oak Park, III., primary loader. on County Trunk JJ nnd laboratory school instructor in Wisconsin and the Chicago area, failed to see the curve as the road was obscured by fog. Her i and Mrs. Nathan Thorpe, (Jays rolled throngh a fence and Mills, intermediate group loader. small Irro sus a niiiR ins.ru.-tor in Methodist church "nago.Sir-uf ored .muses to. schools and camps. The junior lender will bo nnnoimrod later, tvy Myers, Chicago, literary con- sultant for the Methodist publish- ing house, is to conduct evening sessions that are open to the gen- eral public. Hoadriuarlors for the school, which is interdenominational, will be in the First Congregational Church. The statewide Laboratory School sessions are hold in a different Wisconsin city each your. Last year, I lie group con- vened fit Holoit. Tn view of tho opportunity of- fered to Clnnvh School toachors In tho oily, there will bo no lead- ership training school in tho fall, It was statod by the Ministerial Association, tho right side of thc body and loft ankle. A collision at 3rd Avo. S. nnd Johnson St. Tuesday afternoon caused an estimated da ma go to oars driven by William IT. 73, (531 Dowoy St., and Goldio Swanson, Rt. 3. Russ Seeks to Ban Hydrogen Bomb Test UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. Uussia is demanding thnt tho United Stales halt hydrogon bomb tosts In tho Paolfio Islands II administers under a U.N. trus- teeship. The Sovlot (Jologation deposited a draft resolution Tuesday night uith tho trusteeship council's standing committee on petitions. Inc., garage. Thursday at 3 p.m.- for cars rejected on Monday. Thursday at 7 p.m. -Soap Rox Derby night at Crowns Speed- way. Saturday at 9 runs on Saratoga St. Hill. Saturday at Inspection, weight chock, issuance of racing T-shirts, and drawing ifor heat and lane positions. Saturday at 1 :-15 p.m.-Parade of contestants from Market St. up Saratoga St. The race will start at 2 p.m., with heat races in two divisions followed by thc championship race. Then, to close out day, 15 wind up to 70 miles an hour along the Lake Michigan shore- line. Power Is Cut Broken power lines left thou- sands of Kenosha residents grop- ing through the darkness Tues- day night, worrying about food spoiling in refrigerators. Seven persons were injured by tho blasting winds. John Patrick Wobor, 4, Janes- ville, suffered a punctured lung when he and his mother, Mrs. Mary Jano Wobor, and hor two other children, Grctchen, 3, and Steven, 2, were hurled about In their cottage at Rock Lake south of Lake Mills. The wind jolted the cottage from its foundation and smashed it on a railroad right of way. Volunteers, working in a down- pour, chopped the cottage apart to rescue tho family. Tho mo- ther and children were hospitaliz- ed at Watortown. Hurt By Roof Mrs. Fred Lang, of rural Ke- nosha, was taken to a hospital with undetermined injuries after the roof of her home was snatch- ed off by what hor husabnd des- cribed as a "real twister." She was hurled to the floor. Howard Scott, 27, Rt. 2, Cale- donia, struck a tree at the junc- tion of two Racine County trunk roads, about two miles west of Highway '15. Ho was admitted to a Racine hospital with n chest in- jury, wrenched shoulder and cuts on his face. Mrs. A. F. Cowie of Cambridge was cut on the face and hands Then tor a picture window in her Theater, house was shattered. Tho storm dismantled n 100 by 100 foot dining building nt thc Luther Dnlo Bible rnmp on Laud- crdalo Lnko. Tho building had boon oroctod at a cost of Tho roof sailed 200 fool nnd scraped the roof of tho faculty i p.m 30! like Chevrolet, Rocheck 4 Candidates File Nomination Papers dormitory. All tho 170 children In tho 15 Weather for State Milder By Associated I'IVNN Milrlor weather was forecast for Wisconsin today as thunder- storms arid a vrios of small lor- undoes lh.it hit lhe sl.ilo Tui'Ml.iy worked nut. Tompoi at MI os are .s I I od lo move the Ihoi momoli-i tn iihoul 70 In the mil III .uid Ihr- low HO'a soiilh. Four candidates for office have Milw.uikco repot led 1! .'iO lion filed nomination papers at the oi rain. M.idlnon ii.'.'V, Rm-lno 2.0 office of the countv dork, J, A.'lHoll I., K.m Clalio (Ir.inlH- Schindlor announced lod.iy. hiug .70, Super mi Lone Korlt Those filing, all iiopublieans, Wausau II, Two are Schindlor ot Wisconsin Rap I'.irk F.ilh ,i in I I'IIMM- ids, seeking ro-olootion as To m p online In WHrurisin clerk; Dr. Harold 1'omainvillo, Tuesday -il Wisconsin Rapids, socking re oloo- snti to llclnii1-. K7 ('row lion as county coroner; Kdu.inl HI, Lone Roil: Milvtaul-oc HI, J. Carrington, Marshflold, sock Midron HO, 7U, ing ro-elocHon as surveyor; and i n.i 71, (aeon liny Pick Groonoway, town of Sln-i i y.lV'l, I'.irU l-'.dls T.'. ninl Two Jtlvcrsi j loandidiito for tho Assembly OFF TO family of Henry Yeske Jr. looked over Its route, on Tuewhiy ln-forr leaving for Alaska via lhe Alcan Highway. Watehlnff while fath- er mother point, out a Mopping phwe are Henry Paul 6; Jimmy, 16 and Bobby, 3. Thc plan to makn the (rip with a our and trailer in 10 dayn to two ramping each night along thc way. Sgt who been an ROTC InHtructw at Michigan State College, volunteered for Alaskan duty when m-imltatlng for three yearn recently. Thin picture Uikvn at the Henry Yeske Sr. home, 541 Mb Ave. N, (Tribune Staff Photo) District No. 1, North Wood Conn Martin Hoencveld, Ve.spor, also filed nomination papers Republican party precinct com- mit teeman. Deadline for filing nomln itlori papers for the September pri- mary July 13 at 5 p.m. Tho hltfh for iho I Hi at Hlythc ami Thonnnl, (Villf, Low itt WIWotiHln thtn mornlntf woro Hu- pfrlnr SO, IIS, Cronisr and Mclolt W, Milwaukee KHU 56, Granfftburg W, FalU and Waunau 54,   

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