Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: December 14, 1953 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune

Location: Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - December 14, 1953, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin                               THE WBATUBB For Wisconsin: Cloudy ami eoM wHn MOW flurries tonight and Tuesday. Windy. Local weather facto for M hours preceding 7 mm.: Blue. 32; mln. SB. PreclpltatloB .15. Thntk IMy Tribune fftoA CON8TR V E ifV NEWS P E FVBFUE INK OI.VB VONCA CITT, Okla. City police believe bottle of purple Ilk, kept In s grocery ufe which WM robbed, May lead to the capture of the Felice the Ink WM ail over the fleer, and probably on the thieves too during the S1.200 haul. Fortieth Wisconsin Rapids, Monday, December Single Copy Seven Centi Balky Americans Turn Down Interview Dates Next Bikini H-Bomb Test May Have Power of Over 2 Million Tons of TNT Participate in Second Christmas Sing Central Wisconsin residents as- sembled at Lincoln Fieldhouse strong Sunday afternoon to sing and listen to the songs that exemplify the spirit and meaning of Christmas at the second an nual Community Christmas Sing sponsored by the Wisconsin Rap ids Daily Tribune and Radio Sta- tion WFHR. The record audience was unusually significant in view of the icy road conditions throughout the area. Fifteen choirs, representing as many churches of all faiths in the area, four high school choral groups and five grade school choruses cooperated in the event Accidents on Streets jure Trio Icy in the interest of helping to "Put Christ Back Into Christmas." Highlights on the program were two numbers by the massed choir combined with the junior chorus, the opening "O Come All Ye Faithful" and the ancient Christmas carol "Glory to under the direction of Donald Stiemke, Lincoln High School choral director. A special treat this year was the inclusion of the junior chor- us, organized and directed by Miss Carol Grau, grade school'J music supervisor. In addition tojj joining the massed choir in three selections this group of sixth through eighth graders sang four children's Christmas songs. The final number, "Silent was very effective as The Bethlehem Star appeared above the singers in the dark- ened fieldhouse. Audience singing of the favor- ite yuletide songs and age old car- ols was directed by Bernard T. Wet snow that packed and iced'Ziegler, local Chamber of Com- Inj up streets and highways contrib- merce manager and city band di- uted heavily to the weekend accidents. Ten crashes were re-1, Accompanists for the program ported by city and county police. Arthur Houston, organist Two persons received multiple By ELTON C- FAY WASHINGTON hydrogen blast the United States plans for the Bikini Atoll test this spring may exceed the total power of all bombs dropped by the huge Air Forces in World War II. That figure was slightly over two million tons of TNT. Presi- dent Eisenhower said in his speech Tuesday to the United Nations General Assembly that "hydrogen weapons are in the range of millions of tons of TNT's equivalent." The Bikini demonstration well may help resolve any doubts left after that speech about the need for international atomic accord, although the test was not devised for the primary purpose of giving the world's citizens the "comprehension" of atomic warfare and danger. Planned long before Eisenhower took office as president, it will be another stage of the progressive stepup in hydrogen explosions. The test at Bikini will show what could happen to the United States as well as to Russia in a war with hydrogen awesome argument for atomic peace. The last atomic explosion at Bikini probably will become, by comparison, a puny little pop. The two test bombs used there in the 1946 tests had an energy equivalent to about tons of TNT. An air-burst bomb sank ships, crushed others with the shock wave, set others to burning. An underwa- ter burst sent a" big carrier, a battleship and other vessels to the bottom. But neither left any mark on the islands fringing the COMMUNITY combined massed choir and jun- ior chorus of nearly 900 voices is shown in the above picture taken during the second annual Community Christmas Sing at Lincoln Fieldhouse on Sunday afternoon. Bernard T. Ziegler can be seen directing the audience singing. Accompanists, Jerry Meyer, playing and Arthur Houston are shown in the second picture. (Tribune Staff Photos) cuts and bruises in an accident night on a town of Rudolph road, five miles north Saturday 'Rnrinlnh the Moravian Church, and Jer ry Meyer, student and assistant organist at Immanuel Lutheran Church. James Tighe, program of Wisconsin Rapids. In j ur at WFHR, was master were Bernard Schmick, 56, an< his wife, Evelyn, 51, of Rt. 1, Ru dolph. Mrs. Schmick, whose hea struck the windshield of the car is a patient at Riverview Hos pital. County police said Schmicl was driving the car when i skidded sideways into the lef ditch and hit the ditch bank and a boulder, then bounced back on to the road. He told authoritie. he lost control when he applied the brakes while meeting anoth er car whose headlights blinded him. Damage to the auto was se at Struck By Auto Mrs. Amelia Hahn, 80, 1011 Wisconsin St., was slightly in jured at p.m. Saturday when she was struck by a car while crossing the intersection o: llth and Baker Sts. A police re r'-rt indicated that she sufferec bruises and contusions of the knees and right hip, but was no hospitalized. The driver of the car, Jack V McGlynn, 26, 1831 Baker SI., go ing west on Baker, apparently did not see Mrs. Hahn until it was too late to stop, the report said. Damage estimated at re suited from a collision at 9th and Grape Sts. at p.m. Sunday involving cars driven by Leonarc -'C. Gellerman, 41, 930 9th St. S. nd John E. Gilbertson, 18, 240 Pp12th St. S. Frank Ticknor, 17, Port Ed wards, told police late Saturday night that a hit-run car struck his auto on a curve at the inter section of 2nd and 10th Aves. S. causing to his car. Damage Colliding at a.m. Sunday at 3rd Ave. N. and Jackson St. cars driven by Steve R. Kubacki 36, Rt. 1. and Marjorie Van Al stine, 4th Ave. N., sustain ed damage. Turning from 8th St. S. onto Grape St. Sunday afternoon, a car driven by Pat A. Fanning, 17 Baraboo, slid into a car operatec by Loran Hamers, 711 8th St. S., causing damage. Cars driven by Charles R Knuth, 29, 210 16th Ave. N., and Claude W. Clark, 35, Tomahawk 11 Year-Around Gift What gift could yon give that would be enjoyed 865 days In the year? The answer is simple and inexpensive. More and more Central Wis- consin residents are finding that a gift subscription to the Wisconsin Rapids Dally Trl bane not only solves their shopping problems tart also Id a year-aroond remembrance. With each gift sahscrtptlon a gay greeting card is provtd- ei. Can The Tritium's latkM M, to of ceremonies. Of the original 17 choirs listed as participating, two from Ad- Lutheran and St. Joseph's forced to withdraw because of pressing church rehearsals. Choirs taking part were First Congregational, Faith Reformed, Immanuel Lutheran, Moravian, St. John's Episcopal, St. Luke's Lutheran, First Baptist, St. John's Evangelical and Reformed, First Methodist, SS. Peter Paul Ca tholic and Calvary Baptist, all of Wisconsin Rapids, Trinity Lu- theran of Port Edwards, Congre- gational of Nekoosa, Rural Mor- avian, and Congregational of Ad- ams. High schools represented by choruses were Lincoln and 11 As- Christmas Lighting Contest Announced Prizes totaling will be of- fered again this year in the Chamber of Commerce's Christ- mas home lighting contest, Chamber Manager B. T. Ziegler announced today. A first prize, a second prize and five prizes will be awarded in each of two divisions, religious and other. The deadline for entering the contest will be 5 p.m. Dec. 21. Judging will done shortly thereafter by a panel of judges yet to be selected. Householders :n Wisconsin Rapids, Nekoosa and Port Edwards may enter the :ontest by filling out the entry blank to be found elsewhere in this issue of The Tribune and bringing or mailing it to the Chamber office. BOARD MEETS Revised plans for the west side school will be presented by repre- sentatives of Childs Smith, Architects, at the December meeting of the Wisconsin Rapids Board of- Education at to- night. Disagree on Whether All Security Risks Out FORT WORTH, Tex. UPJ-Atty Gen. Herbert Brownell says he thinks all suspected Reds have been cleaned out of the govern ment. But Sen. McCarthy (R-Wis) disagrees. Brownell said in a transcribed Texas radio speech Sunday night he believes all federal employes suspected of Communist tenden cies have -been dismissed. "We think that they are all out of government he said on the state Republican committee's weekly program, "Report to Tex- as." Security program "But the President has prom- ised that within the coming year we will have completed the em ploye security program so that the people can be sure that none of them are left in government. "And those that are outside, we are going to go after them sep the attorney general de- clared. McCarthy, Communist-hunting chairman of the Senate investiga- tions subcommittee, said on the 'Meet the Press" television pro gram Sunday night more employ- es are being fired on loyalty grounds every day. Job Not Ended The administration "is heading in the right direction" in elim- nating subversives from govern- ment, but "I don't think the job is McCarthy, said. Brownell said "one of the first things that President Eisenhower did when he came into office was to set up an employe security program." "And I am glad to say when Mrs. Albert Meier Dies Here Sunday Mrs. Leota Meier, 57, wife of Albert Meier of Wisconsin Rap- ds, died at Sunday after- noon at Riverview Hospital. She tad been hospitalized since Dec. Funeral arrangements are in charge of the Bergman Funeral Home. at Neillsville, where the body, was taken. Soviet Ambassador Schedules Appointment With State Official WASHINGTON UP) j Ambassador Georgi N. Zarubin scheduled an. afternoon appoint- ment p.m.) today with Un- der Secretary of State Walter B. Smith. The appointment was arranged at Zarubin's request but a Soviet embassy spokesman said "I do not believe" it is in connection with President Eisenhower's pro- posal to pool atomic materials tor peace-time use. The Soviet spokesman, while ruling out this as a topic of con- versation, gave no hint about the subject which would be discussed. In the past, nearly all visits by Soviet ambassadors to the State Department have been in connec- tion with Russia's overdue lend- lease account of nearly 11 billion dollars with the United States. It ;was learned that the United States and Russia recently have exchanged views on the six-year- old problem of lend-lease. These exchanges have not been made public but probably will be some time Tuesday according to present plans. The United States has demand- ed that Russia return promptly 186 naval craft and small vessels loaned to it during the war. At the same time, the United States has set a sum of 800 million dol- lars as a fair'settlement for the wartime, lend-lease account as a whole. Russia has offered a maxi- mum of 300 million. the first report came out about a month ago, it showed that 456 security risks have been fir- ed from the government since Ei- senhower took office." Brownell said he "brought out those facts" on the Harry Dex- ter White case because "the peo- ple of this country are entitled to know what goes on in their gov- ernment." GOP National Committeeman H. J. (Jack) Porter of Houston asked whether Brownell's depart ment would "continue to expose other cases." Brownell replied: "I think we will have to be- 11 Hold Corcoran Services Here Funeral services for James A. Corcoran, prominent midwestern lumberman and a native of this city, will be held here at 10 a.m. Wednesday, followed by inter- ment in Calvary Cemetery. The Rt. Rev. Msgr. C. W. Gille is to officiate at the requiem mass in SS. Peter Paul Church. Mr. Corcoran died at his home in Webster, Wis., early Saturday after a two-year illness with a heart ailment. He was 67. Following services at Webster at 10 a.m. Tuesday, the body is to brought here and will lie at the Krohn Berard chapel from ate afternoon until the hour of services Wednesday morning. Prayers will be said at Tuesday evening by the Knights of Columbus and Catholic Order of Foresters. Mr. Corcoran, a former chair- man of the State Conservation Commission and once Democratic national committeeman from Wisconsin, was born in Wiscon- in Rapids Aug. 31, 1886. His par- ents, Mr. and Mrs. Corcoran Sr., were pioneer settlers here. He married Mabel Gauthier of Pitts- ville on June 1, 1914 and they es- tablished a home at Webster. Survivors include the widow; one son, Donald, Bozeman, Mont.; two daughters, Mrs. Allen Schin- er, Rhinelander, and Mrs. Robert Carroll, Minneapolis; three bro- thers, John C., Marianna, Fla.; Dennis J., Chicago, and the Rev. Charles T. Corcoran, S. J., at tfarquette University, Milwau- kee; one sister, Mrs. Anne Kirsch- ing, Wisconsin Rapids; and four grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; one son, Floyd James; one sister, Sister Mary Honora of the Notre Dame Or- der, Milwaukee and one brother, William G. Corcoran, Chicago. INJUNCTION RULING WASHINGTON (IP) State courts are barred from issuing Injunctions to enforce state labor laws which parallel the Taft- Hartley act, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously today. Defense Fund Key fo Budget Says WASHINGTON Sen. Knowland (R-Calif) said today the fate of budget balancing and possible tax reduction efforts will depend on how much President Eisenhower asks Congress to vote in defense funds. Knowland, the Senate Republi- can leader, said in an interview he expects lawmakers to be giv- en Thursday figures on the over- all defense outlay for the year beginning July 1. White House talks with key Republican mem- bers of Congress on the adminis tration's legislative program for 1954 begin on that day. Up to Defense "Until we get the recommen- dations of the Defense Depart ment and the Joint Chiefs oJ Staff on the military program, it will be difficult to come to grips with other budget Knowland observed. The proposed budget drafted by Defense Secretary Wilson and his subordinates was placed be fore the President Saturday, but details have been closely guard ed. However, there is speculation that the 1954 military budget may drop below 40 billion dollars, about 2 billion dollars less than for the current year. Even if there is such a reduc- tion, Sen. Byrd (D-Va) said, the government is likely to wind up this year with a hefty deficit and he can't see any road open to tax reductions beyond those that will be made automatically Jan. 1. These include the end of exess profits taxes on business and re- 11 4 Persons Die In Accidents By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Four persons died in weekend accidents in Wisconsin. Frank Chambers, 60, of Keno- sha, was killed Sunday night when he was struck by a Chica- go and North Western passenger train at a crossing in Racine, William Schmocker, 65, of Gen- esee Depot, was killed Saturday when he drove his auto out of a farm driveway into the path of another on Highway 59 near North Prairie in Waukesha Coun- ty. Roy F. Roman, 30, of Chicago, was killed when his car left Highway 32 south of Kenosha and struck a tree. Burton Sinkler, 21, died Sat- urday of injuries suffered Friday night when his car went out of control and overturned on High- way 42 at the city limits of Two Rivers. lagoon. Sometime next spring, when the seasonal change comes in the direction of the trade winds, which can carry radioactive con tamination long distances, the face of the atoll may change in a fierce and fleeting instant. The release of a force equal ing two or more millions of tons of exploding TNT could erase all trace of not only one but possibly several of the islands fringing the lagoon. There were reports, never denied by the Atomic En ergy Commission, that the 1952 test of a relatively small hydro gen device destroyed the island upon which the device was mounted. That island was in the Eniwetok Atoll, where the AEC has been conducting big-scale It Kline Claims Farm Bureau Has Answers CHICAGO UP) President Al Ian B. Kline said today the an nual convention of his American Farm Bureau Federation would give the "correct" answer to the question of what kind of pro- gram farmers want. The answer, he said, will not be what members of the power- ful House Agriculture Committee came up with in recent farm area tours. The committee will have much to say about new farm legislation the Eisenhower administration will seek at the coming session of Congress. Want Parity Plan The congressional committee said it learned that most farm- ers want present war-born 90 per cent of parfty price supports con tinued for major crops. Parity is a standard for mea- suring farm prices, declared by law to be fair to farmers in re- lation to prices they pay. Kline, who has had several ver- sal clashes with members of the House committee, said the Farm Bureau convention opening here :oday would stand pat in its op- position to use of the rigid, high- evel price floors after 1954, and would again endorse a system of flexible or variable supports. Some delegates from southern 11 Witness Is Branded Spy By McCarthy NEW YORK UPV-Sen. Joseph McCarthy iR-Wis) told a balk} witness today that his refusal to answer questions "in effect' branded him a spy and traitor. The witness was Albert Soco of Long Branch, N. J. Socol, a slightly built bespectacled man said he worked from 1942 to 19-r at the Army's Evans Signal La boratory, Ft. Monmouth, N. J. The senator's subcommittee L probing alleged espionage at th Army base. At a public hearing, the witnesw refused to answer questions con cerning espionage and commv nism. He cited the Fifth Amend ment, declaring he would not an swer on the ground of possible self incrimination. Called Traitor "You are in effect telling the country that you are a traitor, ar espionage agent, and that you ar indulging in declarei McCarthy. "You understand The witness said nothing. "If you were in Communis Russia today and accused of be ing a spy for the United States you would not have a Fifti McCarthy asked. Socol declined to answer. During another exchange, So col declared: "As I understan it, the Fifth Amendment is fo the innocent as well as the gui ty." Refuses Testimony Socol refused to answer wheth er he was a member of the Com munist party or spied against th United States while working a Ft. Monmouth; whether he knev executed atom spy Julius Rosen berg or engaged in espionag with him; whether he now is en gaged in espionage; whethe Communist meetings were hel in his home, and whether he re signed or was suspended from his Ft. Monmouth job. He als vhich a cigaret lighter and about 1.75 in cash was taken; Don- ald Rosenthal, Rt. 1, purse ran- acked, or taken from a ardboard box, and woman's ng shoes, bowling bag and ball tolen; Merlin Tunks, Plainfield, >5 taken from woman's purse; nd Lawrence Krey, Logansville, wo leather jackets removed. Other admitted thefts in which >Vood County residents were the dctims included two guns stol- n from the car of Arthur Lob- er, Auburndale, and taken rom purses in the car of Ed Haferman, Rt. 4, both of which entered Oct. 15 in the Ballroom parking lot near Stev- ens Point, and a shotgun taken the same night from the car of Ronnie Zieher, Pittsville, while parked at Hatfield in Jackson County. Berg said that all of the stolen goods which has been recovered is being held by Clark County authorities until after disposition of charges against the youths there. The questioning took place Friday night at Neillsville, with Officer Donald Sleeter assist- ing. PUGNACIOUS all happy having Ms slumber Mack hear cab. poses reluctantly with hta newly-acquired imatresa, Kristin t, Port The cub, presented Friday to the Donn Havgem by EH Nicholas of FlfffeM, won't he hlberaatiag la that comfy for tang. Over Kristin's objections, Machfe, who has Already frown oat of the caddly Mage, wlH move to a new reatdeace at the Dafce Harrison at Ceaaly. Matt JEWS PA PER I   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication