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Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune: Friday, July 24, 1953 - Page 1

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   Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - July 24, 1953, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin                                For wlMMiln: Inc northWMt eeatml lato U- nlfht. Hatarday partly cloudy with Mat- tered and wanner. Local weather for 14 Ini 1 a.m.: Maximum 74; minimum TWscogsm Ramds; Daily Tnbime CONSTRUCTIVE N E W S P j{ P S4 ______ below nurmul north. 1-S totiWM normal nouth. NormNl M Mitfc, nouth. Nurnml mlnlmm B8 nortk, Houth. Warmer Saturday, cooler Siutey, warmer TiWHtUy, pontlbly cooler Pn-r. .35 Inch north. .15 Inch Mltk M thunderihowera Sat., Wed. Fortieth WtooBflia Wta., Friday, Jnly Single Copy Seven Clark Has Okay to Sign Truce Ko-Red Boss Ousts Pro-Russ Rival in Purge Some Reports Say Kim Himself Has Been Replaced; No Way of Checking Paper QlfOteS Ike's Brother As Calling M'Carthy Menace TOKYO Kim II Sung, the Red boss of North Korea, was reported tonight to have ousted his chief rival and to be replacing all pro-Russian Koreans in his Cabinet with Korean Reds who put Communist China first. There were other contradictory reports that Kim himself had been purged, but there was no way of checking. PHOENIX, Ariz. UP) Banker Arthur Eisenhower, brother of the President, said today that South Korean intelligence sources, who say Kim still is in the he called Sen. McCarthy (R-Wis) saddle, say the reported swing toward closer ties with Red China "the most dangerous menace to could be the start of a split between China's boss, Mao Tze-tung, and Moscow. They call it a fight between Communists trained in Yenan and Reds trained in Moscow. Yenan was the headquarters of Red China's Mao before he took over all of China. America" but added he didn't un- derstand why the remark caused excitement. Eisenhower's quote on McCar- thy appeared Friday night in a copyrighted story in the Las Among the first officials reported kicked out in the purge was i Vegas, Nev., Sun. Marshall Kim's arch rival, Vice President Hu Ka Wee, Soviet-! trained Korean described by South Korean sources as the real ruler of North Korea until Russian Secret Police Chief Lavrenty Beria was ousted. Link to Beria Beria's downfall "It's too bad we have such a Order Sewage Plant Effluent Be Disinfected Offers Plan to Hold Up Aid man in public he said in an interview with the Phoenix Ga- zette at Sky Harbor Airport, where he stopped briefly en route to his home in Kansas City. He is vice president of the Commerce Trust Co., Kansas City's largest bank. Eisenhower said McCarthy makes "deplorable attacks on people and gives people no chance to answer charges In Washington, McCarthy call- ed upon Eisenhower to confirm or deny the Las Vegas statement. The paper which published it is Pleaded by Hank Greenspun, who has been critical of McCarthy. McCarthy told a reporter to- day: "I wouldn't believe anything that Greenspun said, even if he said it under oath. It is now up apparently gave Kim the upper hand in his fight for power with Hu. Other members of the North T T A Korean Red heirarchy reportedly I O FIG IT I TQG6 fired by Kim were Foreign Min-. ister Park Hun Yung, a South] WASHINGTON Me Korean Communist leader who'carthy (R-Wis) today proposed to Arthur Eisenhower to confirm The cities of Wisconsin Rapids fled north in 1946; Justice Min- a tough system of withholding'or deny what Greenspun's news- and Nekoosa and the village of isler Lee SunS YuP> whose back- foreign aid from free world na-J paper has quoted him as saying. Port Edwards have been order- ground was not available; and tions which trade with Red China! "And even if he says he was pd to nrovidp for riisinfprrinn of Ambassador to Russia Choo Yung or whose snips haui goods for quoted correctly I couldn't hold ed to provide lor dismtertion ot Ha chinese lthat against President Eisenhow- effluent from their primary sew- Korean sources said Kim was McCarthy and his Senate inves- er. I don't hold Ike responsible age treatment plants from May a "front" for the Russian-backed tigations subcommittee have at- for what his relatives say." 1 to Sept. 15 of each year, com- Korean Reds and that Hu Ka tributed to America's allies a! His Kansas City office said he mencine in 1954 Wee was the real North Korean "shocking policy of fighting the.was expected back in Kansas City The orders were amone 55 is boss Jith Russian back- my on one hand and tradingllater today. The Borders were among 5o is- mg. Hu Ka Wee entered _North'with him on the other." The Give Sun Report sued by the State Board of Korea from Russia in 1945 with1 group characterized Great Bri- END OF A PERFECT Port Edwards boys, con- eluding their stay at the Nepco Camp today, conclude each day with the flag ceremony. Pictured above is the typical evening scene as the flag is lowered. Left to right arc John Lagerquist, Dave Vechinski. Ronny Lichty, Pete Grab, Eugene Larson, Peter Hegg and Chris Carlson. Robert Goetzke is club director and his assistant is Jack Crook. Jack Torresani is camp super- visor. All are of Wisconsin Rapids. There will be three more weeks of camping activities for boys and girls from the Ne- koosa-Port area. (Tribune Staff Photo) Health and the Wisconsin Com- Russian Gen. T. F. Shtikov, So- tain as worst offender." mittee on Water Pollution to viet member of the U. S.-So- System communities and industries in 12 Commission in Korea from McCarthy announced he will counties, as reported in Thurs- !945 to 1947. Gen. Shtikov re- lead a fight to assess these penal- daj's Tribune, portedly left Hu Ka Wee in ties under the Mutual Security Copies of the orders affecting charge. Act. the Tri-Cities communities were Yenan-Trained received here today. 1. Three times the value of any Moving up alongside Kim in 'ds sold to the Chinese Reds The state agencies found that, the new order, Korean sources 'or bought from them by any na- though chlorination facilities say. is Kim Too Bong, a receivjng u.S. foreign aid. have been installed at the Wis- trained Korean who was chair-, 2. A million dollars for every >consin Rapids, Port Edwards and man of the North Korean carrjed to or from Com- Nekoosa treatment plants, efflu- Pies Supreme Committee. Other munist china in a ship flying the ent from these plants is being Yenan-trained Korean Commu- flag of the recipient nation. discharged into the Wisconsin nists recently announced by' The money would be collected River without disinfection, "caus-' Pyongyang radio to be in theiby Withholding it from the coun- to keep his name in the papers Sean Flannelly, Las Vegas Sun reporter, quoted Arthur Eisen- hower as saying: "When I think of McCarthy, Ij automatically think of Hitler. I would believe anything about him and I think your paper, the Las Vegas Sun, and its publisher, Hank Greenspun, should be com- mended on the stand taken against this rabble-rouser." Asked if he thought the Wis- consin senator has an ultimate objective, Arthur Eisenhower was quoted as replying: 'Of course he has. He wants ing stream pollution involving an unnecessary hazard to public' health." The village of Port Edwards is also ordered to conduct a study i and develop a program for ex- clusion of clear waters from the sanitary sewer system, reporting] findings to the State Board ofi Health on or before July 1, 1954. Eisenhower and Republican con- 11 Fund for Korean Aid WASHINGTON UP) President try's foreign aid allotment. To Fiffht For Plan McCarthy said he will "exert every effort" to have the penal- ties written into the mutual se- curity appropriation bill now Board Fight Seen on Extension Office Move A decision on whether to erect a building at Marshfield, at an estimated cost of to house the Wood County exten- sion service offices, instead of providing quarters for them in the proposed new Courthouse here, may come as the highlight at all costs. He follows the old political game which is: Whose name is mentioned the most in politics is often selected for the highest office.'" Makes Fools of Them pending in the Senate Appropria-) With reference to. McCarthy's tions Committee, of which he is'treatment of witnesses called be- a member. declined to speculate on ad The city oi Nekoosa is order-, gressional leaders decided today inistration reaction to his pro- ed to conduct a study to deter-to seek an initial fund of whicn comes on the heels Spanish Inquisition. He calls ft t- i tvil I 11 4-1 I ._ i mine the extent of improve-, million dollars for rehabilitation ioj ments necessary to obtain im- of Korea after an armistice, proved operation of its sewage1 The decision was reached at a fore his committee, Eisenhower was quoted: "He is a throwback to the in a new appeal by Presidentip eopl e and proceeds to make Eisenhower for appropriation olj fools of them by twisting their the full he What chance do thev r i j_ tin TT 1 l-tfi a iCH, UU 111C V treatment facilities, with House breakfast meeting. ed for the program in the year have? They have no rebuttal be- July 1 as the deadline for report-1Secretary of jhe Treasury Hum- wmch started L The they have no resource to irtrr itc" rrt- 7 UnH rrat- _ _ _ ing its findings. The city of Pittsville is order- ed to provide for elimination of discharge of sewage and indus- phrey and Budget Director Jo- seph M. Dodge sat in with the President and the Republican lawmakers for the 90-minute ses- trial wastes into the Yellow Riv-'sion. er, not later than Dec. 31, 1955, and the same deadline is set for the village of Vesper to eliminate House Speaker Martin said plans already are under way for rehabilitation of the war-torn discharge of such Hemlock Creek. wastes in to'country. Sen. Knowland act- ing majority leader of the Sen- ate, predicted at a news confer- ence that a request for the initial 200 million dollar fund will be approved by Congress before it adjourns. He expressed confidence that Pair Caught Taking Truck .nt: eApresseu u'uiuiuence mat NEKOOSA 53-year-old Ne-iadjournment will come by July koosa man, clad only in despite a considerable list of chased and caught a pair of teen- on which Eisenhower wants age Milwaukeeans early today as they attempted to steal a pick- up truck. action. Knowland estimated the cost of continuing the fighting in Korea for another year would be about Arnold Haessly, 809 Vilas ran down Dolores Turzinski, 18, j He said the 200 million for re- and Franklin Pattersen, 19, who are being held at county jail pending a further investigation in habilitation actually would come out of the defense appropriation for continuing the war and that in effect there would be a saving the case. The couple, who told Nekoosa Of a billion dollars. Police Chief Irvin J. Bey that they ran away from their Mil waukee homes about a month ago, said they had been staying at a cottage in Big Flats, but came to Nekoosa Thursday in search of work. After spending a portion of the night in a wooded area near the cemetery, they attempted to steal Haessly's truck, they admitted. However, Mrs. Haessly awoke when she heard the truck motor and aroused her husband. He dashed to his car and gave chase. Haessly, 53, said today he cut off the pickup truck after it had traveled about 500 feet on Vilas Ave. and forced it to stop. The cupants took off across a field, he said, but he caught them after a 100-yard foot chase and took them back to his home. Nekoosa police were called then and took kthe pair into custody. Miss Turzinski told county au- thorities that she to free on parole from the Oregon School tor Girls. CHANGE DATES CHICAGO speak- ing dates of Adlai E. Stevenson, 1952 Democratic candidate for president, have been changed to Sept. 14 and 15, it WM announced Thursday. voted Wednesday to cut that fig- ure to Eisenhower Thursday address- ed a letter to Chairman Bridges (R-NH) of the appropriations committee, urging Senate appro- val of the full amount he request- ed. Involve Security "This program and these appro- priations directly involve the se- curity of our Eisenhower wrote Bridges, adding: "Our country must exercise constructive and courageous lead- ership, for its own sake as well as for the sake of the other free nations "Deep cuts will certainly be re- ceived, on both sides of the Iron 11 the press, radio and magazines. 11 HOXHA HOLDS JOB LONDON UPKThe Tirana ra- dio announced a revamping of the administrative setup in Com- munist Albania today but Enver Fire German Gestapo Boss BERLIN Germany's Red Gestapo boss, Wilhelm Zais- ser, has been fired as minister of state security, it was officially announced tonight. Zaisser, notorious commander of international brigades in the Spanish Civil War as "General was replaced by Ernst Wollweber, former head of state security for shipping. Zaisser used to boast he had a direct telephone line to L. P. Beria, the ousted Soviet secret police boss. He was the closest to Beria of all East German Communist leaders. Zaisser and Beria met first ir a Red army Ministers. Believes U. S. Would Use Veto To Keep Red China Out of U.N. Hoxha still was listed as presi- in dent (premier) of the Council of Moscow m 1924. Sixteen years later Beria freed Zaisser from a Soviet concentration camp after he had been made a scapegoat for the defeat of the Red inter- national brigades he commanded in Spain. WASHINGTON H. Al- exander Smith (R-NJ) said today that "As things stand now, I am sure we would use the veto" to block the entrance of Commu- nist China into the United Na tions. Smith said in an interview he was greatly pleased at assur- ances given the Foreign Relations Committee by a former member, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., that this country can and should use its veto to keep Communist China out of the U.N. Lodge, former Massachusetts senator and now chief U.S. rep- resentative to the U.N., testified before the committee yesterday in lively support of the world or- ganization. It was his first report to Congress on his stewardship M U.N. ambassador. Smith, who heads the Far East subcommittee of the foreign rela- tions group, said he expected "a lot of heat" from America's China into the U.N. after a truce in Korea. "That's when we're going to have to have a stiff he said. Both branches of Congress are on record against admitting the Chinese Communists to the U.N. President Eisenhower has said he is against it under present world conditions. The United States has never recognized the Communist government at Peiping and Chi- na's U.N. seat is occupied by the Chinese Nationalists. But the New Jersey senator said he expects the Communists to put on an adroit campaign to get Red China into the U.N. "I would not be at all surpris- he said, "if they offered to permit unification of Korea in return for admission. They might even agree to stop the shooting in Indochina. "If the Chinese Communist re- gime gets into the United Na- tions and consolidates Its position, HMtndf Md tunnies to get Red all will be lost" Minor Damage in Fire At Ahdawagam Plant Minor damage was reported early today from a fire which broke out near an exhaust fan at the Ahdawagam Division of Consolidated Water Power Pa- per Co. Firemen were called to the scene when heat from the blaze started the roof of the building smoldering. However, Fire Chief Cloyd Vallin said there was no damage to the roof, which fire- men soaked down thoroughly with water. A company spokesman said the fire, of undetermined origin, broke out about near the exhaust fan on the No. 2 treat- er in the plastics department. GO TEST MARQUETTE, Mich. (IP) The mop-up stage was reached today in "Operation an esti- mated of Marquette coun- ty's children under 10 hav- ing been "shot" with g a m m globulin in a mass inoculation. Two Slightly Injured When Cars Collide Two persons were slightly in jured Thursday afternoon as one accident led to another on 2nd Ave. S. near the Memorial Ar mory. Judith Williamson, 2-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray- mond Williamson, Rt. 3, fell from her parents' auto onto the road- way. Two other cars stopped sud- denly to avoid hitting her, and a third crashed into them. The child suffered an abrasion to the left hip, and John Harper, 1215 Elm St., a passenger in one of the autos involved, sustained a knee and hand laceration in addition to head bruises. Both were taken by city ambulance to Riverview Hospital and were re- leased after treatment. 3 Involved City police said the drivers of the autos involved in the three- car collision were Sophie J. Zur- fluh, Port Edwards, Clark W. Juday, South Bend, Ind., and John P. Weigand, 17, 650 Avon St., driving in that order. The Zurfluh and Juday autos were stopped, authorities said, when Weigand hit the rear of the Juday vehicle, forcing it into the Zurfluh car. Total damage was estimated at Another three-car collision oc- curred Thursday night on 2nd St. N. at Oak St., causing dam- age. Police reported that Harold W. Grunewald, 19, Star Rt., Nekoosa, 11 of the July County Board session next Tuesday. Such a move, which would take the county agricultural agent, home demonstration agent and 4-H Club agent away from the county seat, was thrown out for consideration at the June board meeting. Opposition Develops Reaction from many South Wood County supervisors since that time indicates that they wil provide strong opposition 1o the Idea of separating the agricultur al offices from other county of fices. The Wisconsin Rapids Cham ber of Commerce and other in terested groups have also align ed themselves against the pro posal. The idea is expected to provoke much discussion, however, since North Wood County supervisors are generally believed to be in favor of transferring the exten sion service to Marshfield. Their chief argument, to date, has been that Marshfield is nearer the in- tensive agricultural areas of the county. Supervisor I. W. W e n d t of Marshfield suggested such a move in outlining a long-range building program for the county Reliable Source Reports Document Will Be Signed Sunday or Monday SEOUL, Saturday here and in Washing- ton reported Friday the Korean truce may be signed Sunday or Monday, Korean time. A usually reliable source close to the talks said here it probably would be Sunday. In Washington, where officials said Gen. Mark W. Clark has received final authorization from President Eisenhower to sign for the United Nations, belief was expressed that the signing would be Monday. Washington sources said the day and hour would be set 24 hours in advance and would be announced immediately so the world would have that much notice. The sources both in Seoul and in Washington took into account that the signing date could be upset by some new move of South Korea's President Syngman Rhee, who opposes the truce. The signing date probably was set, tentatively at least, by senior liaison officers at a ing in Panmunjom Friday after- _ Savage Red Attacks On 3 Outposts SEOUL. Saturday Chinese Red attacks by perhaps men lashed Friday night at three hilltop outposts on the Ko- some Allied promises to the Reds'rean Western Front northeast of "cannot be allowed to happen." tne truce-talk town of Panmun- Rhee's new threats brought no immediate reaction here as liai- noon. A full-dress session of the main delegation might be held today to approve the date. NEW RHEE ATTACK PANMUNJOM Ko- rea's President Syngman Rhee to- day angrily denounced an armis- tice agreement which appeared all but signed and warned that jom. An officer at the front report- ed Chinese were in the trenches son officers put finishing touches i on two of the hills and Allied on a truce. The full truce delega- soldiers were fighting with bay- tions were expected to be called together at any moment to set a signing date. It could come this week. The liaison officers met for 2 hours. 48 minutes, then recessed without scheduling another ses- sion. Truce Near The South Korean President acknowledged that a truce was imminent and said he is anxious "not to follow a unilateral policy if it can be avoided." Rhee has threatened severa times in the past to pull out of the U.N. Command and fight on alone. In a strongly worded state ment, Rhee accused the Allies of giving the Communists pledges which "render impossible a ful fillment" of some of South Ko 11 J. W. Gotz Is on FHA Committee Appointment of Joseph W. Gotz, Star Rt, Nekoosa, to a three-year term on the Wood County Farmers Home Admin- istration committee was announc- ed today. He succeeds John Zubella, Rt. 2, Junction City, whose term ex- pired June 30. Also on the com- mittee are Wilburt Dix, Rt. 1, Marshfield, and Ellis Fox, Rt. 1, Auburndale. A committee of three serves n each agricultural county throughout the nation in which the agency makes farm loans. Appointments are scheduled so that a committee always has two experienced members. The Wood County committee aids in making supervised credit available to local farmers, accord- Ing to LeRoy A. Jensen, county supervisor. Farmers Home Administration are located In Courthouse Annex No. 2, Wisconsin at the January board meeting. It was brought up again in June by Supervisor Frank D. Abel Wisconsin Rapids, who is chairman of the Courthouse and jail building committee. Ho said a decision on such a move was necessary before his committee could go ahead with plans on the county building progrnm, but ask- ed the board members to reserve their comments until the July session. To Pick Architect The special Courthouse com- mittee is also expected to come in with a recommendation on em- 11 Dairy Judging Team Picked The Wood County 4-H dairy judging team to compete at the State Fair was selected today on the basis of results in the county judging contest held Thursday. Louis Rosandick, county 4-H Club agent, said that Dick Kief- for, Auburndale, Marlene Fruin, Milladore, and Paul Hagen, Marshfield, finished as the top three in the judging and will con- stitute thp county team. The alternate will be Ronald Anderson, Rt. 2, Marshfield, who finished fourth. A total of 35 county 4-H Club boys and girls participated in the contest, which was held on the farms of Wilmer Drollinger, Auburndale, George Kieffer, Au- burndale, and Roy Burhopp, Richfield. A class of heifers and cows were judged in the Ilolstein, Brown Swiss, and Guernsey aroeds. Glen Vergeront, extension dairyman at the University of Wisconsin, judged the classes ind also gave a demonstration on the proper methods of fitting and showing animals. onets and gun butts. "We still hold 50 per cent" of the two hills, the officer said. The Chinese unleashed fiery barrages of Russian-made Katu- sha rockets on Outpost Esther. Heavy Barrage The Reds also threw in heavy artillery and mortar barrages. Allied artillery in counter-fira cut up two Chinese efforts to re- inforce the attack. Eerie flares lit the sky. Lt. William Bates, of Portland, Maine, radioed back from Out- post Esther in the heat of tha lighting: "Holding. Doing fine. Will tinue to hold as long as the am- munition holds." AP Correspondent John Ran- dolph reported from the Central Front that two Chinese compan- ies attacked a hill seized by the South Koreans earlier. After Sundown The Reds hit just after sun- down and apparently were on back two hours before mid. night. There was fighting throughout the day on four hills in the area northeast of Kumhwa. One of the lills had been retaken from the Reds by the South Koreans, but the other three were still in Com- munist hands despite the South Korean efforts. The U. S. 8th Army reported Allied artillery caught five Chinese companies about 800 soldiers Kumhwa-Kumsong valley on the Central Front and killed or wounded 270 Reds. American and South Korean roops overpowered the Reds in six of nine other small but savage battles across the war- torn peninsula. in the open in the Battle to Cut Air Funds Won WASHINGTON Eisenhower and Secretary of De- fense Wilson have won their long battle to cut funds and target goals of the Air Force. Without a record vote, the Senate late Thursday shouted ap- Thc contest was organized a biu carrying directed by Rosandick, who will iceompany the dairy judging earn and the livestock judging earn, which was selected earlier, o the competition at the State 'Fair in August. Russian Situation: 4 Malenkov Is Top Man In Kremlin: Gilmore By EDDY GILMORE PARIS is running Soviet Russia today? Frankly, I don't know and I doubt if anyone outside the Kremlin knows. The dismissal of L. P. officially as Georgi Malen- kov's No. 1 narrowed the field. But it has also confused it. A wise Western diplomat, with many years' experience in Soviet affairs, is not completely convinced by the Beria story. He explains: "This could be another grand piece of Russian make-believe and deception. They may be try- ing to confuse the West at this extremely important moment of our times. The Beria disgrace could be a huge hoax." I do not hold with this dip- I'll be the first to admit, doesn't mean very much. I believe Malenkov is in charge and has been In charge since Sta- lin was stricken. I believe he saw Beria stealing up behind him and out of the corner of his quick, Slavic eye, caught a glimmer of the knife in Beria's hand. I be- lieve that he felt strong enough, to eliminate the high chieftain of the political police, with his prin- cipal henchmen. If this is true then a lot more people are due for disgrace and denunciation in Russia, For Beria had a lot of friends and followers. He was a policeman and in any dictatorship there are a lot ot policemen. They don't like to give up their authority lightly, or at all. What do we know about Malen- 11 i to operate the defense establishment for the fiscal year which began July 1. Earlier Tests The real test had come earlier after lengthy and at times angry debate. First, by a 55-38, roll call, the Senate rejected an effort by Sen. Maybank (D-S.C.) to give the Air Force an additional 400 million dollars to order 200 B-47 jet bombers, capable of delivering atomic bombs. This was the big test, since it was the first to come to a vote. Republican lines held firm against the increase and they picked up 9 valuable Democratic votes to add to the 46 GOP ones. Voting for Maybank's amend' ment were 37 Democrats and 1 Independent. If Maybank's move had sue- ceeded. other Democrats planned amendments to restore more of the five billion dollars cut from 11 Swimming Pod Didn't Blew Too Far Away ALBUQUERQUE, NH UP) A lost and found ad in tht ABjs> querque Journal asks for tat turn of a swmlmlnf pool whkfc, the owner SUM, blsw ararior one of New Mexico's breezes. Later the ad WBI Seems the pool was found thrst neighbor's   

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