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Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune Newspaper Archive: November 28, 1927 - Page 1

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Publication: Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune

Location: Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin

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   Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - November 28, 1927, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin                               A. P. LEASED WIRE paper la served by leased wire with the newa .report of the Associated Press, Run'ds Daih Tnlnme S T R T I V E Irrfcl NEWS PA P E R KH A CONSTRUCTIVE 8 PAGES TODAY The net paid circulation of The Tribune u Fourteenth 4409. Wisconsin Rapids, Wis., Monday, November 28, 1927. Today Too Many Women. Money for Everybody. Cancer and Fear. of Whiskers. -----By Arthur Brisbane----- Turkey has excess women according to a census just taken Kemal Pasha decided that one wife is enough for one Turk, so surplus women are taking up work of al kinds. That is better than a dul harem, and one Turk among many Fighting kills off the ways has, which accounts for po- lygamy. One man could not pos- sibly keep several women happy and contented. That accounts for veils on their faces and prison-like harems. KemaPs interesting experiment, abolishing polygamy, will cause more rapid increase of population, for bne thing, and perhaps restore the ancient glory of the Turks, a powerful race, admired for gallantry by all their the Ar- menians. Mr. Jacob Coxey, who led his fam- ous army to Washington thirty-four years ago, evolves a new plan at the age of 73. He would have the gov- ernment lend money to citizens at one-half of one per cent interest a year. "Interest is the economic hook- worm of the says he. The economic hookworm for the borrower probably would be the scarcity of collateral, unless Mr. Coxey's plan would not allow gov- ernment to demand collateral. Price Three Cents CLAIMS POLAND IS FOMENTING REVOLT Bind Agent, Rob Soo Line Office at Point ROBBERS ESCAPE WITH MORE THAN TWO UNIDENTIFIED MEN AC- COST TICKET AGENT WHEN ON HIS WAY HOME AFTER LOCKING OFFICE. "4 H Club" Champs Vie for Honors The worst of cancer is fear. Can- cer is a variegated disease, includ- ing growths of various kinds. Taken in time, a cancer is no more dangerous than a bad splinter that might cause blood poisoning if not removed. Each cancer begins very small. If near the surface, detected and re- moved an end of it. If allowed to grow, it sends but particles of itself that grow eHe- where. A cancer in the thumb will reappear in the armpit. When you notice any abnormal growth, however small, see a doctor that knows failing that, go to a hospital and ask for a specialist. Don't be afraid of the word "can- it is not the word that kills. There is NO CURE FOR CAN- CER except the surgeon's knife, and in some cases radium. Medicine is worthless, although frauds recom- mend it. Cheerfulness helps, perhaps, a cheerful heart being more efficient in fighting disease. Many who fear cancer have no such thing. They should go to a hospital and make sure. Cancer is not inherited, but tend- ency to cancer is inherited. It is believed that the right "crosses" in marriage would eliminate cancer, but the wrong wife or husband is worse than cancer. Christmas spending, one sign of American prosperity, amounts to fourteen hundred and twenty-two million -dollars, about. Whiskers foi imitation Santa Clauses alone cost The most welcome present is of- ten something useless; it seems really LIKE a present. The farmer and his sons that gave the wife and mother a now ax to chop kindling wood did not understand Christmas giving. (Special to The Tribune) Stevens than cash was taken from the local icket office of the Soo Line rail- vay Saturday evening between and o'clock by two un- lentified men who after securing lie money left the ticket agent bound and gagged. A. C. Spindler, ticket agent, had locked the doors and closed the safe at about p. m. and left for his home. When almost home two men in a light closed 4-door car forced him to the curbing and one of them rushing over to Spin- dler's car asked him what he meant by breaking traffic laws. Spindler said he did not know what laws he was breaking but the man said that he would have to return to the police headquarters with him and petting' into the car told Spindler to turn back. Pulls Out Gun When Spindler remonstrated the stranger pushed a heavy calibre automatic pistol into his ribs and lirected him to drive back to the Soo Line station. Arriving there and still with the pistol in his ribs he was forced to unlock the ticket office, open the safe and deliver the cash to the marauder. Mean- while the other man had followed them back to the station in the other car and waited outside. After tucking the cash into his pockets the stranger with the per- suasive power of his pistol forced Spindler to allow himself to be bound hand and foot and gagged. With this completed the robber hurriedly left and getting into the car outdoors sped away into the darkness. Spindler at once began tugging at the rope that held him. He freed himself enough to get to the telephone and after getting the gag out of his mouth called for help. A short time later he was liberated and the sheriff's office notified. This morning a suspect was arrested by Stevens Point police and is being held for questioning. Describes Captor Spindler described his captor as a man about 28 years old, of stout build, wearing a gray overcoat and cap and wearing glasses. He did not see the other man at all and could give no description of him. A check up revealed that was taken from the cash drawer. employed Chicago, Nov. the songs of their respective states, and displaying flamboyant banners, one thousand boys and girls, state champions of America's heart, home, head, and health club, inarch- ed about the main arena of the In- FLOODS SWEEP COAST REGION OF FRENCH ALGERIA Named Envoy ternational Livestock exposition to- day, inspected the thousands of ex- hibitions, and then vied for new Na- tional honors. Rising above the chorus of voices, was "Iowa, Iowa, That's Where The Corn while "My Old Ken- tuck came in a. close sec- ond. The honor of wearing the most colorful costume went unofficially to Rachel Nelson, 14, Taylor, Ariz, girl, who wore an Arizona cow- puncher's sombrero, a red and yel- low scarf, and purple chaps. Kans- as, with a huge painted sun flower emblem, and Nebraska, with a pic- ture of a large ear of corn on which was painted "Nebraska Corn stood out among the state delegations. B. H. Heide, general manager of the exposition, welcomed "4H Club" champions following which they in- spected the show and then compet- ed in a health scoring contest, and girls' home economics contest. Judging of giade, cross-bred, Hereford, Short Horn, Aberdeen Angus, Galloway, Police! Short Horn, Red Polled, stecis, county groups of calves, and Short Horn breeding classes comprised the pro- gram of the exposition today. MAN KILLED IN RESORT SHOOTING ANOTHER INJURED BY SHOT- GUN FIRE; RESORT OWNER HELD UNDER BONDS WHILE SHOOTING IS INVESTIGATED HOUSES SWEPT AWAY AND LARGE BUILDINGS COLLAPSE IN AREA FIFTY MILES WIDE Algiers, Nov. which swept the coastal region of the French territory of Algeria, in North Africa, after a 40-hour rain today were believed to have claim- ed hundreds of lives. Houses were swept away and large buildings col- lapsed in an area 50 miles wide, from Orleansville to Perregau and northward to the Mediterranean sea. The brief message of an engineer over a hurriedly repaired telephone line saved hundreds of lives when a dam a third of a mile long broke at Perregau. The region is isolated and relief work is difficult. Warns People "The dam is breaking. Ring the Tocsin. Warn the the engineer shouted over the telephone to the authorities at Perregau. The warning that millions of tons of water were threatening the city spread rapidly. Ten thousand inhab- itants fled to the Three hours after the first warning was given, the waters, which the dam had im- pounded, swept the city. Fifty houses fell in ruins, but it is believed everyone escaped. trains were held up by the flood between Algiers and Crane. Airplanes dropped food in sacks to the passengers. Three hundred pas- sengers on another train were rescu- ed in boats and taken to Saint Denis Du Sig. Mostaganem Hit Worst The worst damage was at Mosta- ganem. There the city hall collapsed. Homes, barns and livestock were de- SIZE OF BUDGET Marshfield Colonel Noble Brandon Judah of Chicago, civilian aid to the secre- tary of war during the World War, has been appointed ambassador to Cuba by President Coolidge. The ap- pointee, a Chicago attorney, is a reserve colonel, director of the ex- ecutive committee of the Chicago Title and Trust Company, and trus- tee of Brown University. Mr. Spindler had been The Rev. John R. Hart, at the Unix'ersity of Pennsylvania, has es- tablished a forum of forums "to combat atheist clubs in the colleges." All discussion is useful, but atheist clubs need worry no one. They com- bat and destroy themselves. t Watch your atheist in an earth- quake, big storm at sea or heavy thunderstorm and you see in his face the fact that man is naturally a religious animal, and "would have to invent a God if he did not have one." in the freight office of the Soo Line for a number of years but on No- vember ISth was transferred to the passenger service. File Charges Against Winnebago Sheriff Nov. intimacies with Poiret, French dressmaker, com- plains that American women are "too conservative" in dress. He is hard to please. American women display their arms, legs, knees, arm- pits, ribs, back down to the waist (Continued on Page Two) LITTLE JOE Oshkosh, Wis., Beer parties and women prisoners were charged against Sheriff Walter Plummer in testimony read before the Winne- bago county board this morning by District Attorney Frank B. Keefe. Testimony of Geraldine O'Connor, said to be of Shawano, Wis., was that she and the sheriff and other men left the jail at times to drink beer and go to roadhouses, she said. The district attorney said he would place little credence in her story except that it was to be sup- ported by further testimony from an undersheriff, a jail employee and several prisoners. Miss O'Connor said that beer seiz- ed as evidence was consumed in the jail and that once she was drunk in the jail on alcohol. When the jailer and the sheriff were absent she was given the keys, she said, and acted as jailer. Port Washington, Nov. John Ernest, brother-in-law of Charles Boder, proprietor of a re- sort south of here, is being held in the county jail here today while au- thorities investigate a shooting at the Boder summer cottage Saturday night in which Gordon Sincock, 29, was fatally wounded. According to district Attorney N. H. Rodin, when Rosario Ro.ss, 30, and Harold P. Ryan, 28, both of Milwaukee, accompanied by Sin- cock, entered the Boder grounds last night, they were met by shot- gun fire. Sincock was fatally wound- ed and Ross was shot in the hand. Boder told the district attorney that thieves attempted to enter his cottage Friday night and that he asked for protection. Pending ar- rival of deputy, Ernest was assigned, Boder said, to guard the home. Ryan told authorities that Sin- cock was in search of whiskey which he had cached near the road- house. "They told me that they were go- ing to get whiskey from this cottage and asked if I cared to come stroyed. Eight bridges were swept away. Twenty-eight victims of the flood were buried there. Throughout the flood-swept area, 37 bodies were known to have been recovered. All these were natives. Troops to take up the work of re- lief arrived in the area from Algiers and other points. They found the railroads and roadways wiped out, making it difficult to reach the ref- ugees. Proper Lighting Advised For Schools Progressives May Endorse Withrow La Crosse, Wis., Nov. Formal endorsement of Assembly- man Gardner R. Withrow as the La Follctto progressive candidate for the congressional nomination in the seventh district is expected at a conference to be held soon. Withrow, who if nominated, would be a candidate for the position of Congressman Joseph Beck, endorsed for governor, was agreed on at a conference of leaders of the organi- zation here Saturday. Although no definite endorsement was made his choice is expected at a conference to be hold after sentiment is sounded. Withrow was proposed to the con- ference by District Attorney L. J. Brorly, after he refused to let his with Ryan said." I asked if they were going to steal the whis- key and Sincock replied, no, it be- longs to me." Ryan ascribed his escape from be- ing wounded to getting out of the car on the right side as his two companions descended from the left. He stood behind the car a minute and while standing there, heard the shots, he said. At the first shot he jumped into the machine, Ross fol- lowed him a few moments later, and they drove away. "I didn't know in which direction Sincock went or where he he told police Sunday. Sincock, in the meantime, had staggered into Madison, Nov. mendations for proper lighting m school rooms are contained in the current Wisconsin Journal of edu- cation, following a statement thit "modern educational methods im- pose upon the eyes of school chil- dren requirements that create a need for the best working condi- tions." The recommendations are that glare be eliminated by proper dif- fusion of light, elimination of sur- faces that reflect light and preven- tion of sharp contrasts, such as a brilliant light against a dark back- ground. All lights should be shield- ed or diffused through shades. The recommendations state that all windows, transoms, walls, ceilings, globes, and reflectors must be kept clean. "Seats and desks should be so ar- ranged that the natural working Lilliendahl Trial Jury Is Chosen Court Room, Mays Landing, N. J., Nov. jury of seven men and five women will hear the case on Mrs. Margaret Lilliendahl and Willis Beach, charged with the mur- der of the woman's aged husband. The innocent call "Yoo-Hoo" com- monly used as friendly greeting among school girls, played an im- portant part of the grim business of covering up the murder, Prose- cutor Hinkle told the jury in his opening address. Mrs. Lilliendahl drove her aged husband to that secluded spot, he said, "And there Beach killed him. i "Then Beach fled through the un- derbrush. As he reached the main road where his car was parked he raised his hands to his mouth and signalled her that he was safely away. he called, meaning 'I'm safe now. Go ahead and spread the alarm and tell your story of two negroes attacking you and kil- SURPRISES MEN WHO ADOPTED IT MOVE FOR RECONSIDERATION FOLLOWS VOTING OF BIG- GEST TAX LEVY IN HISTORY OF WOOD COUNTY. Presentation at the close of the board session Saturday afternoon of a county budget for the ensuing year totaling with an- other in special county charges, apparently came as a sur- prise to many of the board mem- bers who had voted the expendi- tures, and there was evidence that a number would have welcomed an opportunity to make some revisions in the highway program or else- where. In fact P. J. Kraus, Marsh- field, went so far as to move re- consideration of the finance com- mittee's report, with a view to eliminating some of the items, but when it was made evident that any material change could only be made by going over much of the board's work again, with consequent pro- longation of the session, his pro- posal was turned down. After adoption of the budget, which is within a few hundred dol- lars of the county's lepal tax limit, A. E. Bennett, the oldest member in point of service, rose to recall the time some years ago when adoption by the board of a tax levy brought a county-wide pro- test from the taxpayers. Many Never Came Back "As I he said, "many of the members of that board were missing when the roll was calle  will cause serious difficulty for the cities and villages of the county that have already adopted their new budgets, based on a county tax similar to that of last He cited the example of Xekoosa, which he said is threatened with a situation under which, with the levying of the maximum lepal tax, only will be available for city affairs during the conduct of 1928. ling your husband. I'm off, to fix up my alibi.' The jury, of five women and seven men with a woman foreman, was selected in little more than an hour and Hinkle's address took scarcely more than half an hour. One wit- ness, a surveyor, was on the stand when court adjourned for lunch. Following is the budget, in de- tail: nearby lapsed. farmhouse, where he col- Weather Report Mostly cloudy tonight and Tuesday, prob- ably showers to- night; not much change in tem- perature. Tbrcnlcnlmr own name go before the conference. .07 inch rain. Today's Weather Facts: Maximum temperature for 24 hours ending at noon, 40; minimum for same period, 28; precipitation, light comes from above, over the left shoulder. Neither pupils or teachers should face windows. A teacher should never stand at the side of the room with her back to the windows so that students have to look into the glare to follow her." The Journal recommends buff colored shades that pull from the center of the window up or down, as the best light comes from the top of the window, and these shades will diffuse the light without com- pletely shutting it out. Stabbing of Five Ends Poker Game Rhinelander, Wis., Nov. of five men climaxed a poker game in a local saloon Sunday morning when John Ikonen, angered over his losses at cards, slashed his fellow gamblers, dur- ing a fight. Ikonen, according to spectators, left the saloon at 6 a. m. Sunday and returned an hour later and stabbed the men. All the injured men were given medical attention. One of them has wounds over his heart and kidneys while another was wounded so severely in his arm that physicians say an ampu- tation may be necessary. The attacker was overpowered by )hief of Police Maurice Straud only after two chairs had been iroken over his head and a shower of billiard cues and balls had been thrown at him. Discover Bodies of Two Army Aviators n__t_____ Uniontown, Pa., Nov. The bodies of two army aviators who met death when their plane crashed in a mountain forest Fri- day, were found by a party of res- curers in the dense woods on Chest- nut Ridge today. The body of Pilot E. R. Emory was found some 250 feet from the plane. Nearby lay the body of me- chanic William D. Vollman. Both aviators had their parachutes one was partly opened while the other was strapped tight to the victim's back, indicating that the birdman had but a few minutes to get from the plane before it was wrecked in the woods. County Taxes Mothers pension County board___________ County clerk ___________ County treasurer _______ County assessments______ Resident poor___________ Asylum bonds (int.) _____ Asylum bonds Highway bonds Highway bonds Divorce counsel _________ District attorney________ County court ___________ Circuit, municipal and jus- tice courts ___________ County buildings _______ Court house ____________ Elections _______________ (Continued on Page Two) BARON WOOLAVINGTON SHOWERS LUXURIES ON JANESVILLE GIRLS, BROTH- ER'S GRANDDAUGHTERS London, Nov. girls from Janesville, Wis., have fount a fairy godfather in their granr uncle, Baron Woolavington, former- ly Sir James Buchanan, wealthy dis- tiller, who has established a trust fund for them. He was unaware until recently, that two granddaughters of his bro- ther, William Buchanan, Miss Cath- erine and Miss Jane Buchanan, were living in comparative poverty in America. On discovering this, Baron Woolavington invited the girls to England as his guests and them a check to pay for massages and to outfit them for the ourney. They arrived at their greit uncle's fine house in Berkeley Square, London, about six weeks ago. They were heartily welcomed and the Baron, who was born 78 Denies Charges On behalf of Poland it was denied that Poland entertained any aggres- sive intentions against Lithuania. There is overwhelming evidence, Premier Waldemaras of Lithuania declared in a signed telegram to tha Reuter's coirespondent in Berlin, that certain persons who fled from Lithuania after the attempted revo- lution at Taurogen last September, being used by the Polish gov- ernment as organizers of a move- ment against his government. Although the council of Ambas- r Jors in 1923 approved Poland's claim to Vilna, Lithuania has refus- ed to accept this ruling. Recently friendly representations were made at Kovno, seat of the Lithuanian government, by Great Britain, France and Italy, but the "State of War" between Poland and Lithuania Soviet Not Uneasy Advices from Warsaw that are official, do not share the uneasiness existing in government circles in Moscow, Berlin and Kovno. The note of the Soviet government to Poland expressing concern is inter- preted in Warsaw as meaning that Russia merely desired to create an atmosphere that would enable her to participate in whatever preliminary discussions are held, thereby rnak'ng it sure that Russia will be included the matter comes before league of nations. The specific mat- ter before the league is Lithuania's charge that Lithuanian clergy in the Vilna district are being mistreated. French Aviators In Plane Crash Appeal Dismissed Washington, Nov. appeal of Arthur Rich, son of a wealthy Battle Creek manufacturer, to set aside his conviction in Mich- igan on the charge of criminal as- sault, for which he was sentenced to prison for life, was dismissed today by the supreme court, for want of jurisdiction. ago in Canada, supplied them with funds to maintain their position s his relatives. He introduced them o his friends and generally showed them around London, taking them to its theatres and points of inter- est. Before sending them home he provided for their future. When the story became known here and he was asked to confirm it, Baron Woolavington modestly refused any praise for his action. "I only did what any other man would do where the members of his family were he told The Daily Express" I can't see why I should be given publicity. As to his provision for their future, he said, "I have created a trust for them so that they won't have to worry any more about how to live." Baron Woolavington, who was created a peer in 1922, was the owner of two derby winners, cap- tain cuttle in 1922, and Coronach in 1924. Buenos Aires, Nov. A dispatch to La Nacion, from Tan- Morocco, says that six French aviators were killed when their plane, one of a squadron of five, crashed in flames forty miles from the town of Denib. The dispatch says the plane fell meters wrapped in flames and that the fliers, a lieutenant, a ser- geant, three non-commission officers and a radio operator, were comple- tely charred. They were buried to- day. The plane left Fez yesterday morning, according to the dnpatch. Bean Will Press Highway Charges Before Committee What, if anything, is to come of the charges of illegality in the con- duct of the affairs of the county -vay committee and of the coun- ty normal and agricultural schools, that took an important share of the county board's attention at the re- cent session, will not be known for several weeks. A. P. Bean, who brought before the board allegations of illegal pay- ment of money to highway committee members, said folhwing the close of the session Saturday that he would press his charges' be- fore the grievance estab- by the board. This comm'ttce, consisting of C. Dutton, Daniel Ruggles and John has agreed to meet and hear his charges within a few weeks he said. It appears doubtful if the allega- tions of malfcpc.im in office, made against W. D. Connor, trustee of the normal and agricultural schools, by the educational committee, will be pressed before the grievance com- mittee. A. E. Bennett, who present- ed the r'inrjor. indicated Saturday he did not regard the commit- tee -.s a proper tribuml to hear his accusations. At its closing meeting Saturday the board, on motion of Sunervisoi Rugglea, the grievai {Continued on Page Two) Governor Clarifies Stand on Wet Issue Milwaukee, Nov. nor Fred Zimmerman's position on the wet and dry question today was believed better clarified as a result Reject Appropriation For a County Agent Wautoma, Waushara county board of supervisors reject- ed, by a vote of 14 to 11, a resolu- tion appropriating for a county agent. It appropriated for arms and ammunition to sup- ply a force of 35 sheriff's deputies in combatting bank robbery and other crimes, at the request of the Waushara County Bankers' associ- ation. The board instructed the county clerk to issue no permits for Sunday dances. Perry Leaves Prison Leavenworth, Kas., Nov. M. Perry, former prohibi- tion director for Wisconsin, was re- leased from the federal penitentiary uux. t A b A 1 1 YY of a speech before the Chicago Motor .on .He was serving a 3-year sentence for conspiracy to club. Speaking to club members Satur- day night, Governor Zimmerman took issue with Anton J. Cermak, president of the Cook county board of commissioners, who attacked present conditions in various states, attributing them to prohibition. "I want to call attention to the fact that before prohibition we did not have millions of dollars for roads, parks and public buildings, he said. "Since prohibition there has come a great period of finan- 'cing and large bond issues for the construction of numerous public buildings and other public improve- ments." At the time of his inauguration and during his campaign, the gover- nor said, he promised to uphold the constitution and now he intended to "hold to his word." Producing a bill, he added, "this is lawful money of the coun- try. It will buy either booze or roads, but it won't buy both." act. violate the Volstead NOV. 28 17 to ChrliUMi Watch tor bargains and the first Christmas Seals. NEWSPAPER!   

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