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Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune: Friday, February 6, 1925 - Page 1

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   Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune (Newspaper) - February 6, 1925, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin                                Cloud? anJ anwtllcd to- night and Saturday probably rain by Saturday nic'it, warmer tonight aouth portion. C 0 NSTRUCTIVE N EWS PAPER the tkoarfiu of tlw gent tend only to new; but of every hasty only to ELEVENTH 3547. WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WIS., FRIDAY FEBRUARY 6, 1925. PRICE THREE CENTS Today Brides, Poor Lamb. Gold and Japan's Yen. Business Rules? Of Course. Queer Ma Ferguson. By Arthur Brisbane Tonight is to be, the great night of the "reformed adventists." In Hollywood, Mrs. Rowan expects -to lead the few faithful up to heaven. In Long the east side of the continent, a stout little man, thirty-three years old, named Reidt. calling himself "the prophet will lead his collection of survivors up to heaven, if all goes as planned. The program is hard on the ma- jority. Only are to be saved and go up in clouds. All the rest of the sixteen hundred million hu- mans, black, white, brown and yel- low, on this earth, will be destroyed. That is what you might call dis- crimination. The destined to be saved are called "brides of the lamb." Why a lamb should want even one bride, to say nothing of is a puzzling feature of this-strange world ending. But very probably the world WON'T end, and the 000 brides will have to postpone meeting the lamb for some time. The pitiful feature of the whole snarchronistic performance is the lerror of the prophet Reidt's four little children, called "followers of the prophet." They believe the world will end, and they don't want to go up in a cloud. Mrs. Reidt, wife of the prophet of doom, bears up well. Prophets' wives don't always take prophecies RADIO SHOWS COLLINS STILL LIVES seriously. Japan is shipping gold to the United States to advance the price of the yen, now 25 per cent below par. The Japanese are able, excell- ing: in industry, inventiveness, adap- tation, capacity for hard work. Lack of gold would not destroy interna- tional confidence in the yen. But such lack of confidence might WILL HEAR FOES OF NEW TAX BILL ON FEBRUARY 17 SENTIMENT IN FAVOR OF MEASURE IS STRONG IN LEG- ISLATURE; DIVIDEND TAX WILL BRING FIGHT Madison, Wis., Feb. tion to income tax bill pre- sented in the legislature this week after four weeks of joint confer- ences between corporation commit- tee of the senate and the taxation committee of the house will be air- ed at a public hearing to be held in the assembly chamber, Tuesday af- ternoon, Feb. 17. Early announce- ment of the hearing has been given by the committee so that the full opposition can be heard at one time, The committee contemplates an im- mediate revision of the bill follow- ing the suggestions made at the hearing and the recommendation of it in the house within a. few days after the completion of the hearing. Sentiment Is Favorable There is every probability that the tax bill will be in the assembly for consideration during the week of February 23rH. A canvass has al- made of the assembly and it is claimed ti.at there are 44' members who voted for a similar proposal two years ago and that more than a dozen other members have expressed themselves as favor- able to the new income tax measure. Those who have been making a canvass of the senate, estimate that the bill may receive as high as 18 votes. There is more sentiment fav- oring the passage of this bill than of any tax measure that has been introduced in recent years. There is considerable opposition to the re- peal of the personal property off- set, but this has been modified by reducing the corporation rates and Wheat Prices Collapse As Buyers Quit Chicago, Feb. 6 sudden- ly collapsed today. May deliveries dropped to as low as a bushel, almost 21 cents under last week's high price record. Increased selling on an early upturn revealed that the market was without adequate support from new speculative buy- ers. Fluctuations began very rapidly on the downward swing of the mar market, and trading assumed lar- ger proportions. _. The violence of the break was made worse by the execution of distress orders on the part of the holders whose markets have been exhausted and who were forced to sell out so as to stop further loss to themselves or their brokers. The first break today carried the market down to under the lowest level since the recent setback in price began. After reaching a decided rally took place, but soon the pressure became more urgent than ever and a decline to en- sued. In some instances the market fell more than 3 cents a bushel be- fore stop loss selling could be filed. APPOINTMENT OF STONE CONFIRMED come from the Activity of Japan's, by not increaBmg the rate On indi- flying machine factories. A nation turning out 500 fighting flying machines a month has some ambitious plan in mind. Failure to realize the plan would be disastrous to the yen, and some other things in Japan. The -western mind does not un- derstand Japaneses thought or pre- judice. This was illustrated in To- kio recently when an art loan ex- hibit included Rodin's statue, "The Kiss." The police interfered, not because the figures in the statue were naked, for nudity is not objec- tionable in Japan, where it has long been customary for men and wom- rn completely naked to bathe in tubs on the sidewalks. The Japanese do not kiss and con- sider that a very objectionable cus- tom. The police compromised finallj by putting a screen around the statue, permitting only those of suf- ficient age and education to look at it. In this country we would put a screen around the lady taking her bath in a little tub on the sidewalk and let the Rodin statue stand ex- posed in any public park. Norman Hapgood, writing from Washington, says: "Business now rules the nation." Why, certainly! This is a business nation; our pow- erful interests are business inter- Every country is rultd by its prin- cipal "interests." Religion rules Thibet through the grand llama and the tens of thou- sands of Thibetan monks. Royalty, clergy rut- cd France in old days, before the revolution. Now the French name for France. France has learned some hard lessons, and the bourgeoisie calls in militarism, as a big brother, to help watch and ward while business goes on. That's simply imitating the western American bank, where you may see standing quietly in a corner of the lobby a man with a repeating rifle, waiting for any hold-up crowd. In a grocery you find a grocer in tommand, ,in a hardware shop it's x hardware man. In a village of havers, it is some beaver that rules. In this country of business, OF 10URSE, business rules. viduals. Oppose Dividend Tax One feature of the bill which will bring the fire of opposition is the proposal for the taxation of all divi- dends of Wisconsin corporations as incomes. This was the bone of con- tention in the legislature two years ago and it is sure to be made the target of attack at the hearing a week from Tuesday. The proposed income tax bill will come from the printer on Friday and copies will be distributed by members of the legislature to sons interested in the provision of the measure. The committee ha? originally contemplated a hearing next week but it was decided to postpone the hearing until Feb. 13th so that all interested parties might have an opportunity. The bill will be subjected to its first vote in the assembly -where sentiment for the measure seems to have been unified. Change in Bank Tax This bill will raise approximately but by repealing the personal property offset the com- munities of the state will receive about the same share of income tax as they do at the present time in spite of the reduction in the rate of proportion. The bank tax bill which would tax banks on their income instead of on their capital stock will be reported as a separate, measure so as not to complicate it with the proposed big incoms tax measure. There is-no change in the general administra- tion features of the tax bill over the SENATE VOTES 71-6 CONFIRM ING APPOINTMENT: CANNOT TAKE OFFICE UNTIL NEXT SESSION OF COURT present law. Assessments still be made through the tax commis- sion and deputy income tax asses- sors located in different parts of the state. Citizens Find Clues to Slayer of Children Los Angeles, Feb. C New clues to the identity of the slayer or slayers of Mae and Nina Mai tin, sisters found dead in a ditch all grown OV-M. with weeds almost six riiontfis aftei ;heir disappearance, were hA tho Washington, Feb. the nomination of Atty. Gen Stone to be a supreme court justice -was confirmed last night by the senate 71 to 6, Mr. Stone will be unable to take his place on the bench un- til March 2 when the court con- venes after its present recess. May Take Oath Now Mr. Stone can qualify immediate- ly, however, by taking the oath of office. Should he pursue that course Assistant Atty. Gen. would become the active head of the jus- tice department until the senate acts on the appointment of Charles R. Warren of Michigan to succeed the retiring attorney general. Mr. Warren's nomination is now before the judicial committee to which it was referred back by a mo- tion for an inquiry into the con- "sugar trust investiga- tion" 12 years ago in which Mr. Warren was a witness. The nom- ination probably -will be given con- sideration next Monday. After Long Discussion The vote on Mr. Stone's nomina- tion in the senate came after 76 hours of discussion in open execu- session, a somewhat unusual manner of considering executive ap- pointments. Two democrats, two republicans and two farmer-labo senators voted against tion. Senator Wheeler and his coi league and counsel, Senator Walsh withheld their votes. BLAMES ARMY AND NAVY FOR LACK OF U.S. AIR PROGRESS GENERAL MITCHELL SAYS POL- ICY OF TWO DEPARTMENTS IS TO SUBORDINATE NA- TION'S AIR DEFENSES (By Associated Press) Washington, Feb. General Mitchell, assistant chief of the air service, informed Secretaiy Weeks today that he believed "the present war department organization and its administration quite incap- able of creating, handling or admin- istering air power in an effective manner." In the letter repljing to the re- ouest from the war secretary for all the facts upon which the assistant army air chief based recent state- ments "serving to reflect on the army air General Mitchell said he vas convinced that the system of air- craft management in operation in the United States "is detrimental to the country's good, and will serve to compromise our national defense should an emergency arise." Letter Before Committee The general's letter was placed be- fore the house aircraft committee! which had met to hear both General' Mitchell and Brigadier General Drum I of the army geneial staff. "The general view of the war de- pal General Mitchell wrote, "is to limit the ability of aviation in a militaiy way and in spite of the findings of the joint army and na% y board, in spite of the most conclusive evidence of every country in the world, the navy department still ap- pears before congress and still tes- tifies incorrectly and gives the im- pression that aircraft are of limited power against battleships. Defense Weakened "The resistance of the war depart- ment to the creation of an independ- ent aeronautical personnel is insist- ent and constant. "I have fully criticized the system now in operation which I am confi- dent is detrimental to the country's good, and which Where Boulder'Trapped Cave Explorer Above is entiance to Sand Cave, near Cave City, Ky., where Floyd Collins, left, was tiapped by an eight-ton boulder which dropped from the roof, pinning his foot. Diagram shows how Collins was trapped. Dotted line is where workers hoped to clear space to free Collins. Smaller inset is Jewel Estes, 17, who discoveied Collins' plight. seriously com- plicate our national defense should an emergency arise." General Mitchell said since the wai 433 million dollars has been put aviation, but that he did not believe the appropriations are economically administered on account of the du- plication of land bases because of ;he army and navy. He declared that Major General Patrick, chief of the aimy service, had, like himself, en- dorsed "a united air although "inch a move oposed by Secretary Weeks as well as Secretary Wilbur. Americans Quit Opium Conference (By Associated Press) Geneva, Feb. American delegation has withdrawn from the international opium conference. Rep- _ __, _ resentative Porter and his asso-j Lincoln suburb, were calmly avvait- Adventists Are Certain World Will End Tonight TESTSHOWS LIGHT HUNG AROUND HIS NECK IS BURNING MAKE SLOW PROGRESS IN EF- FORTS TO SINK NEW SHAFT TO RESCUE KENTUCKY CAVE, PRISONER (By Sand Feb. of a second radio amplification test at this morning convinced men, who made the tett that Floyd Col-' lins, for six held entombed in the fastnesses of a cavern he was exploring, remains alive. ,1 Light Still Burns ?j The test, made by a small radid amplifying set, determined definite- ly that the electric light placed about Collins' neck by William B. Miller, reporter, on one of his num- erous trips to Collins' side in thai cave, still burned. j A lighting system battery wad] used in conjunction with the ampli-' fier. j Meanwhile sappers were making a new entry to the cave in an attempt to reach Collins. j New Shaft Goes Slowly The work on the new shaft was' begun yesterday and early today SAVIOUR WILL COME IN CLOUD TO T4KE THEM TO HEAVEN. MEMBERS OF ROWANITE CULT DECLARE. (By Associated Press) Lincoln, Neb., Feb. by the ridicule of other members of the Seventh Day Adventisl church, 12 followers of Mrs. Margaret W. Rowen of Hollywood, Cal., self-styled seeress, today at College View, ciates plan to leave Geneva totlay and to sail for home next Thursday on the steamer President Harding. Mr. Porter this morning1 official- ly informed the conference that de- spite more than two months of dis- cussions and repeated adjournments lands of the result of the activities the tizens LITTLE JOE ARE'WHAI WRITS OH AND HUSBANDS C4RKY AROUND IN committee organized in.the Meagbbor- icod by the little girls' relatives. An nquiry over the bodies was not expected to develop any additional clues. Presence of Mystery Poison Bottle Explained (By Associated Press) Columbus, 0., Feb. finding yesterday of a strange bottle of poison in the dispensary of the Ohio State University is no longer j a mystery. William E. Keyaer, an I instructor in- the college of pharma- cy, today volunteered the informa- tion that he purchased the bottle of poison a year ago for laboratory work. It was labeled in his hand writing. Mill Worker Drowns Grtcn Bay, Feb. Simon, 25-year-old paper mill worker, fell through tht Jet on the east river here and drowruri while coming from wtrk yeiterday. Find Losers in Lawsuit Are Without Property Supplementary proceedings wer held before Special Court Commis sioner Charles E. Briere Thursda and today for the.purpose of discov- ering what had become of the pio perty formerly owned by J. B. Web r and J. W. BIystone, Nekoosa, los ers in a suit for brought the Nekoosa State bank. When -be bank officials attempted to col cct this sum, which a jury verdict iwarded them as due on .1 note, i was found that both Weber and Slystone were without property having deeded the property over to their sons previously. purpose of the hearing to find what became of the propeity and what caused the defendants in tfie civil suit to deed it over to thoir properties were deeded over in 1923. Weber claims that ho had promised his son, William, that the property1 would be deeded over to him if he (William) contemplated marriage, vhile Blystone said that he deeded his property over to his two sons because they had always worked for him. It is thought thot another suit may be brought by tho bank officials to recover the property from the sons in order to secure payment on the note and the interest clue. New Bank Examiner Will Have Office Here John E. Ijtt, Cornell, has been ap- pointed assistant national bank ex- aminer for Wisconsin, and will have lis headquarters in Wisconsin Ra- pids, according to an announcement made at Chippewa Falls. He wil' je on the staff of D. H. Cooney, former Wisconsin Rapids man, who Marshfield Man Found Dead in Refrigerator Car Marshficld, Louis Bohman, ho deserted his family here and left the city several months ago nhile under bail of pending a trial in circuit court at Wisconsin clear the for which the conference had been held would not materialize. ChildLabor Law Safe In State-Bob (By Associated Press) Madison, Wis., Feb. Robert M. La Follette in a telegram Rapids of a charge of driving an sent to Lieutenant Governor Henry automobile while intoxicated, was Huber, presiding official of the state found dead in an ice bunker of a senate, today declared he had faith Nortrwestern refrigerator car at Omaha, Nebraska, according to pis- patches received last night by The Daily News and Chief of Police Michaef Griffin. Cause of Death Unknown The dispatches contained no de- tails of Bohman's death except to state that the body was thought to have been dead two days before its discoveiy. Whether death resulted from natural sources or was self- inflicted could r.ot be learned. Omn- in the fact that Wisconsin held fast ing the millennium which they be- lieve will come at midnight tonight when Christ will appear as a cloud in the sky, and will begin his "sevei journey to the earth, gathering along the way the saints who are tc accompany him. Wait End in Homes Today as yesterday most cul members went about their daily wori although some aie spending tthei time in fasting and praying. There will be no pompous preparations made for the coming of the end, Jo< Gammel, leader of the group, said On the contrary, the reception oi Christ by the Rovvenites will be modest. "We will await the end of the world in our Mr. Gamme said. The College View cult will not go to the lull top as some of the fol- lowers have done. They did that only to escape the mobs of unsaver run riot in anger on the earth.' Mr. Gammel said he did not expect the earth to bo swept away to its doom "iu the twinkle of an but DeMolay Cagers Will Not Play Antigo Here Tonight The game of basketball scheduled for this evening at the Lincoln high school gjmnasium between the Ar.- tigo and Wisconsin Rapids De Molay basketball teams has been declared ofT, it was learned late today. Inabil- ity of the Antigo cagers to make the trip here was given as the cause of the postponment. to its progressive principles aid j declared that midnight would mark would ratify the amendment rela- ting to child labor. "I cannot believe there is real danger that the Wisconsin legisla- ture will fail to ratify the federal child labor the sena- tor stated. "Other states may faltei" but Wisconsin stands true to pro- greisive principles and solemn plat- form pledges. It has been a SOUICP of prido to me that Wisconsin has ha authorities found papers in the i one of the most advanced child labor man's pockets indicating him to Louis Bohman of this city. Farmers of State Desire to Keep One Room Schools Madison, little red school house has plenty of cham- pions fn the Wisconsin legislature and the prominence of the one-room institutions of learning promises to be undimned at the close of the present legislative session. There is strong sentiment amonsj :he farmer members of the legisla- ture to make it harder to abandon he small schools of the lural dis- trict. Senator James A. Barken Antigo, leclaiccl on Thursday that he would lo all in his power to maintain the common rural school. "The little country school is of i greater value to the farmers than he he declared. "If it were not for the little .school house farm- rs would not get together once in hree years." At the last session of the legJsla- urc a law was passed for the con- olidation of school districts and th-- var clouds are gathering for this provision. The biggest opposition omes from residents of small school laws in the country and that eveiy member of congress from our st'nt-., voted for both the federal cnild la- bor law and for the pending amend- ment to the constitution. "I recall that the Wisconsin legis- lature of 1923 memorialized con- gress to submit this amendment and its ratification was' pledged in tho Wisconsin republican and democra- tic platforms in the last election. Last Tribute Is Paid to Former Governor the beginning of the end. It will take seven days, he said, for the com- pletion of the destruction. End Will Come Slowly "At Mr. Gammel related, "Christ will appear as a cloud in the sky no larger than a man's hand, and iv ill begin the trip from heaven to earth. It will require seven clajs to reach here, for he has stops to make on the way. One of the stops be on a planet not visible to any carthly person. This is the planet nearest heaven. There arrangements will be made to feed those saints whom Christ is bringing back to earth. The journey back will also take seven days." The homes of cult members are virtually stripped of furniture and only the bare necessities remain, they having sold almost everything to set- tle their worldly debts and to be pre- for their ascension. Leaders in the Seventh Day Ad- POLO COSTS LIFE OF FLEISCHMANN EXERTION TOO MUCH FOR HEART OF M I L LJ 0 N A IR E hole 10 feet deep had been made. work was slowed up by the necessi- ty of time bring the shaft as it was deepened. It has been estimated that Collins is lying 55 feet belo-wj the surface. Estimates as to time it will take to sink the shaft vary from 24 to 72 hours. Modern apparatus is replacing the primi- tive means (previously used. Every; precaution is bein gtaken to guard the workers against tumbling into any cavern that may exist between the surface and Collins, or just be- ond him. The new opening is ex- pected to reach the natural passagq some 18 feet behind Collins. In this way the workers hope to enter the shaft on the side of the rock which is holding Collins. That the electric light bulb, placed about Collins last Wednesday is still burning was taken an an indication that the cavein had not reached prisoner's head. Any strong pres- sure would crush the and thus break the current. Young Slayer Given Life Sentence in State Prison SPORTSMAN AND .MANUFACTURER. YEAST (By Associated Press) Miami, Fla., Feb. G. Julius enthusiasm for polo cost him his life yesterday, and to- night the body of the millionaire sportsman will be sent to his old home in Cincinnati for burial. The body lay in state today in an un- dertaker's chapel. Violent exertion which comes to the polo player proved too much for his heart despite years of tennis, golf and yachting, and Mr. Fleisch- mann, who was in his 53rd year, col- lapsed at Miami Beach during a spirited game and died before a physician could reach him. Mr. Pleischmann, who was head of probably the largest yeast manu- facturing company in the world, had taken up polo in recent years. Last season he fell from a pony and broke his collar bone but despite the pleas of friends he went in for the sport again this year and was play- (By Associated Marinctte, Feb. 6 Life Im- prisonment in the state prison at; Waupun was the sentence given to Alvin Carrie, 22, when he appeared before Judge W. B. Quinlan here to- day in connection with the murder of Robert Saundcrs Wednesday ernoon at Hickory. Carrie confessed" to the crime before Justice Joseph Fisher lntn T pjav afternoon, j Judge Quinlan pronounced sen- tence at p. m. after the dig. trict attorney of Oconto county re- viewed the entire case. Then young Carrie was returned to the jail to await being taken to pun this afternoon. Recover Dead Man's Body From Milwaukee i Milwaukee, Feb. body of Joseph Rosewicz, engineer of Modem Grinder company, which cupied a section of Lindsey builtijng, was removed from the debris fttrlj; today. 'j Search for the man started lasfi night -when he failed to return home. Firemen, who later in the day had the accident. He apparently was f sw PP u- Wf. weie searching the in the best of health when he enter- ed the match and had invited friends to join him after the game at his new hom.e Eight Year Old Child Drowns; Another Saved (By Associated Press) Racine, Wis., Feb. Vincent Meyer, 8 year old child, was drown- ed while walking on ice cakes in Lake Michigan. ventist church term the Rowenitej John Rudut, a companion, also s the national bank examiner for districts. Under the provisions of the law, one or two adjoining dis- tricts can vote to and this state. Mr. Utt, it is declared, secured appointment through vice-president elect-Charles G. who is ;o be an intimate friend of his. outvote a neighboring district, fore ing its residents into the consolidn- lien. (By Associated Press) Oconto, Wis., Feb. demise of a distinguished citizen was mourned heie today as this city was awaiting the funeral of Edward Scofield, twice governor of Wiscon sin, at this afternoon. The stars and stripes ever all county and municipal buildings I weie at half mast. The schools I closed at noon and in a prorlomatiori issued by the mayor all business ac- tivity were suspended during the last rites for the former governor. doctrine as false and contrary to the teachings of their church. Passengers Shaken Up When Train Hits Freight! fell into tho water but was rescued. Rabbi Milton Ellis risked his life in attempting to save the lad, re- covering the boy and working over him while afloat on an ice cake. The Trains coming into Oconto bi- forc noon Were crowded with 'life long friends of the deceased and at 11 o'clock a delegation from the state cnpitot headed by Senator Chase of this city arrived. The funeral service will bo held (Special to the Tribune) Junction City, Feb. wom- an was slightly injured and a num- ber of passengers were shaken up this morning when Milwaukee road train No. 6, south bound, backed into a local freight train which was standing east of the station here. The passenger train was forced to run past the station and then back in, and apparently in backing in the engineer failed to receive his signal and struck the freight train harder than was intended. The wo- man injured, a Mrs. Peterson whose the house with the R. A. i home is north of Junction City, was Garrison of the Presbyterian church j examined by a Junction City pliysi- officiating. Burial will take place cian and found to be suffering chief Everygreen cemetery Jy from nervous shock. by the efforts of Mary Wright, a high school girl, and two 15 year olcl lads who partially disrobed ana plunged into the icy water in a vain endeavor to reach the boy. Syracuse Student Dies Following Boxing K. 0. (By Associated Press) Syracuse, N. Y., Feb. ton R. Stever, Syracuse university sophomore, is dead of a knockout blow received in a bout with Carl Hansen in university gym. The bout was an elimination eon- test in the welferweiffet to decide who would rcprtttnt Syra- cuse university ,'ji flomi mttt 4t the naftl acadamy. age and it was not until after mid- night that his body found. parently he had been seated at boiler in the engine loom and had not heard the fii-st cries of warning. Finding- his escape through the door cut off he apparently attempted ttf escape thorugh a window but was overcome by smoke a short distanco fiom the shaft. Woman Superintendent of Schools Storm Center Superior, Wis., Feb. Grace Geary, superintendent of schools, became a storm center today when it was learned that a "round rabin" letter had been signed by six of the 11 members of the lo- cal school board requesting her ren- ignation. With the other standing strongly for MiV Geary, the trouble is expected to break afr a meeting of the board next day night. It was learned that the letter wal to give Geary chance to sign gracefully, but to it hai not been mailed. The letter iui4 that it is the belief of the that a man superintendent is ed at Superior. Poifi hits Zol Murlty, Vtt ant UNI tftfe, Bay in ttratf M htjl tat   

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