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Whitewater Register: Friday, September 21, 1860 - Page 1

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   Whitewater Register (Newspaper) - September 21, 1860, Whitewater, Wisconsin                                H. L.KANN, Proprietor. >o. Building Stern. T OFUL'tiXCKlPTlOX: n-M! oiiice utitl mail .sub- utiiiLiin. aiiil to j w utnuiiii; tueiK j ill j 'HATES OF AOVKKTISIXC. j inch ftiitk'!   NO. 183. wt .Hw; V i.X.'i' '.m.' Ht'ii' M) (H.I I --.iin. tinned and A'-kcr- The Whitewater Register BOOK AND JOB PRINTING OFFICE, The Duty and Responsibility of the ears, would seem a strnn ;-e proposition, and North-West. tffftrmitt'r I860. euuatu State Journal. li'ilf Si.: iw.-i.l- H not ta .W. iuripfcion of BOOK AND JOB PRINTING at prioiss will compare favorably with iho--o of CliieaLto. Jum'svilU', M or Milwaukee. yet it is so simple that I Suck the power al- most of elucidating it. Look at England. She'is ambitious, as "she well may be, and ought to bo, ti> retain th. t dominion, reach- ing into every of tie habitable globe, wiiieli she now exercises She will belikely to do it, too, und. mny dj it, by" reducing, every successive ye.fir, -th 3 power of her aris- tocracy, and mtraducin more and more, couce, seems to delight in sending forth to the popular element of 3 Democracy into the lor the fe (low- Citizen 3 It U a bright September sun that is shining duwn upon us such a sun as nature, pleased with the remembrance of her own KAXX. C'O.WJW ft Jt f MKKt UAV EOTO.R i KXCHAiXCiE graco the close of u season which has been crowned with- ubundunct! and luxuriance, unknown even to her own profusencss. It ia such a sun us nature, pleased with seeing the growth of a noble capital in a great State, iruiy be supposed to send oat to illu- minate and to make rrioro effulgent the tnug- hideeiit beauties of the place on which urti assembled.- It is such a September sun as wo might suppose sympa'tiiiaing- with the efforts of good men, lovers of lib- erty, anxious to secure their own freedom, to perpetuate that freedom for the enjoyment vernment. overnment of Eng- administration of her _ In many respects, tho lurid, though more aris ocratic, is still less nionarchuil than our wn. The British empire exists to-day otiH recocjnizino- and gradually adopting the great truth that it' the British empire is to tantl, it is the IJrit- we ish people who are to m lintuin thut empire uncl enjoy and it. France, the other great European JM wer which seems to stand firmer now limn ;ver, and to be re- t p'.iJlUS Ul riirri'-m in sum i A. O.H  CUE IKS, K. .1 M. 0. Hi) I i. STAItfX, i ml Mii-iu'- k. M. in a stylo JKt Etc., in the West. BUSINESS CARDS ewing her career of pr jpcrity and glory rance, under the .form of a despotism, "has new m F of their posterity, and to extend its blessings j adopted the principle ol universal suffrage, throughout the whole world, and for all i and the empire of "Fn nee to-day, is a de- mocracy. Tho Austria! empire "is falling. And why ISeeuuso De sioeracv is in Germany to it; i liberation of the people of its various- n.u ions, and the exer- cise of universal suft'rn ;o. And Italy to- day, all along the ccust c :'tire Mediterranean to tho dr n s rising up tional life, by itd universal suHruge ptir; tttid 'J in tao Having in rittiniii' toteext FAST-WORKING, POWER JOB PRESS, of turniin.' out Orer Out Tttoutund fai- fttr Hour, MX- are enabled tc do the fi- ner ati'i stiuiller ite.senptiou.s of ,-ni 'h Cir- .Milars, Curtis. .Hilt Letter Hi-ads, uh'., pronipt- iy miieli eheapei- i.hun euu bo dune unvv else in tins soecu'ti. Our Jobbing Department mler tin) Mijx'rinteiii.lenee of :i Printer, Uwiifj on luuiil a lu.r_'i> assortment of ('m-i.1 tkuinj, plain, t'am-ynmi e'.-lored'Nutu. O.-ip am! Lett, r anil vveiux- that tho .irooi.l :d- v aeluc-veil bv the Koyisuu1 tVn- t; ceelienee. I promptings Kl UA.Mi iff' M. 1IK.MIY bv k II of work, slukl, bo t'ultv and Best Assortment Of TVJ.H- am.i Muteruil in this county, ami are prepar- ed to do all descriptions of Letter J're.s.s Printing, Handbills, i Circulars, j Bill-Heads, i Bank Checks, Programmes, 1 Ball Tickets, i Drafts, Posters, f Cards, labels Deeds, generations, may have sent forth, in token of sympathy with such n noble race 15i.it. fellow-citizens, bright nnd cheerful as this hour is, my heart is oppressed arvd I am unable at once to Hi't myself above the sad- ness of recent sceiies and painful recollec- tions. I obeyed the command of the Eepub- lieau people of "Wisconsin, to appear before them on this, the l-lt'ii day of September, and as I approached tho beautiful seaport, if j power by the action of t I may so call the city that crowns the shores j Now if in the old we of Luke Michigan, atid uil'ortls entrance to mont and empire are cut Benched this had anticipated, because I had become habituated to, a wel- come that should be distinguished by the light of a thousand torches, and by the voi- ces of music and of cannon. But the angel of death passed just before me on the way, and instead of footsteps lighted with the greeting of thousands of my fellow-citizens, j found only a thick darkness, increased, us only nature's darkness can be, by the weep- ing and waiiing of mothers for the loss of children, and refusing to be comforted. I have been quite unable to rise from that sud- den shock; to forget, that instead of the voice of a kind and merry and Denial wel- ty of renewed na- .j the principle of tho limitation of se whole people. i'ltl, where govern- and estab- came over tbe nation n tide of demoraliza- tion, tho i-esults of which, coming on us with such fearful rapidity, surpass almost our power to describe or'to sufficiently- de- plore. What have we seen since that was Oone We have seen the people of the United States- for it is of no use to cast the respon- sibility on parties, or administrations, or statesmen extend slavery all around the coast of the Gulf of Meaico. AYe have seen them take Texas into the Union, and agree that she should come in us a Slave Shite and have the right to multiply herself into four more Slave States., TVe have seen California and New Mexico conquered by the people of tho United States, with the deliberate con- sent, it' not purpose, tht.it slavery should be extended from the Mississippi river to the Pacific ocean. You have seen the Constitu- tion of the United -States perverted, by the consent of the people, until that Constitution instead of being a law of freedom and a cit- adel of hum tin rights, has come to be pro- nounced, by the affected judgment find will- ing consent of the highest "tribunal of the United States, yet enjoying tho confidence lished so strong in he' ted tary aristocracy, no empire can stand cxcep Democratic principle; P. United States of Ansc long you can hold thes union or maintain one as it yields the ok around over the ica, and say how .-States in a federal common authority here except on the princi ales of Democracy'? support of the people, to be ft tower and bulwark of human slavery, of African bond- j age: arid you have had now announced, by the goverEnncnt of the United States, which you, yourselves brought into power, that i wherever the Constitution of the United i States goes, it carries, not freedom with the eagles of conquest, but hateful chains und i bondage. (Applause.) If the principle which you have thus permitted to be esiab- I Tished is true-, then there is not an arsenal within tbe United States, not u military or i naval school of the Federal riot Federal jail, not a dock-yard, and not a ship that traverses the ocean, bearing tho i American flag in any part of the globe, where the law, the normal law, the law by which men are to be held and tried arid and yet I have seen that they never compre- principles of IJenioeracy, But, fellow-citizens, it is easy to talk about Democracy. I men prate of it by tho hour, and o 1 mire it, and shout come. I heard only mourning and 1 amenta- I for it, and express the r reverence for it; tion in tho streets. To you, perTraps. the scene seems somewhat foreign, because it oc- curred in your beautiful seaport, but it was not merely a municipal calamity. It is a calamity and disaster thut befalls the State, and strikes home dismay and horror to the bosoms of ail its people, for these were citi- zens of the State who have perished, and those who survive are the mourners; the desolate wido'vs and orphans who are be- reaved. Let nae, before I proceed, take the liberty to bring this subject home to the State authorities of "Wisconsin, and to ask and to implore- that nothing may be left un- done, if there is yet anything that can be Therefore, it is that you of tbe 1 judged, is not a law by which every man i North-west are, above a i things, first, last, j whose ancestor was a slave is a slave, and by and all the lime, to rec >gniza as the great l- element of the Hepull e, the system and which property in slaves, not freedom of man, is the normal condition of society un- i der the Federal system of government. I can only ask you to consider for a moment i how near you have coma to losing every- i thing which you enjoy of this great interest of freedom. The battle culminated at last on tho fields of Kansas. How severe and systems, ur by both con bined. An aristoc- racy is the government in which the few privileged own the lards, arid the many unprivileged work the! i, or in which the few privileged own the .'aborers and the la- borers work for thc-ui. In either case the laborer works on coiupu --ion, and under the constraint offeree; urn in either case he Ordfrs, etc., done, to dreadful takes that which .may of the owners of the Iu id after the wants or labor or both rescue a single sufferer from that j are satisfied. The labon r must rest content system practica to tha shores of the Gulf "of Mexico, and to cut oft' the Atlantic States from all commu- i meation with the sister States on the Pacific, and so to extend slavery from the center, both ways, restoring it throughout the whole country. You will say this was a very vis- ionary attempt; but it was far from "being visionary. It was possible, anil for a time seemed fearfully probable probable for this reason, that the land must have labor, and it must be either the labor of freemen or the >tyl''. on shorter l.'U duiio at notice, and at lov.-cr ajaniity, and to bring to the corn- with the privilege of be ng protected in his j labor of slaves. Introduce slave labor in torts of social life, and of a sound, good, re- personal rights; and the powers of the gov- j any way that you can, and free labor is rc- Any other Office in this County overy iUciSiiv Prir.iinjj IN COLORS AND BRONZE, WL: ;v. W is '.vi-I! made ar- 1V1M Magazines and Books, DKKH.MA.N. u.. bi'' '.ind at doui- ill tilf Statn. I'fitui n iloni- well, iil it t-j t.lu.1 orliee ot'i' To Dairymen. i-i XT i t art. :v 'AliMKHS AllE DESIKOITS OF U'ho ru'.ve no objet.'ttun ligious, uncl public education, the orphans who fire left to wander on the streets by the lake side. Fellow-ci .izcTis, it is P. political law and when I say political I mean a higher law [cries of a hiw of Provi- deuce, tliat empire hu.5 for the last three thousand yean, so long aa we have records of made its way constantly ernment are exercised by the owners of i pel led, and avoids it. Slave labor was i ntro- labor and of land. i duced into the country by the opening of Here then you see I h .ve brought you to j the African slave-trade, and when the terri- of the great problem of tory of tbe "United States, in the interior of society in this rt public empire. It is j the continent, was open to slavery with your this: Is there any dangc- that in the United j consent and mine, nothing then would have j States, the citizen wilt .ot be the owner of j remained but to re-open atvd restore the Af- the land lie cultvtites? If there is j rican slave trade for it is prohibited only by any part j jiitsf of the United States, where the j a law, and the same power that made the westward, and that it must continue to j labor or the land is polized by capital, i law could repeal and abrogate The same move on westward until the tides of the re- j there is a place in which che Democratic eto- power that abrogated the "Missouri Compro- r.cwed and of the decaying civilizations of merit has not, yet had its ntrodaction or been tho world rner-t on tho .shores of the Pacific i permitted to work its v ay effectually. So Ucean. "Within a year 1 have seemed to j on tho other hand ns, L :-rc where you are, mvself she value a score of i AH A, Il.i Y, T now, A. T. Kit CO. 1I1UGK. 'Mi .-.-d. HA.S.SKTT, -Sii 2IST their Croani. find at .f. Tanner Tho ovor for r-iih? in up on primtiples stri'-tly -irientiUc. niitl rlin ini'-r will .s 'tisly fhtl ox D.'itrvin.-in of its siipc-rionty OV-.T ail oth- Sl'Tr. it is .Sliuplc ami Cheap, for at prt'cLsoly the c-'Stofnw- kin-_'! us tho o'.vner wishes jiet'.hem idtr'-diioed in .ill oth-TS interested in I'.nttor kiii" rt'Miifj'toi.l null .ind examine this Chuni. A. TA-NM'.K i Co., 1-StJO. PLO "WSl! I Plows! Plows i TO CAl-li THE ATTKJS- i fit" wholes-alo iJealei's in agri r.'.- our i FALL STOCK OF PLOWS, i '.viiii'h :irc- now boinir broiisht into mark-'f. a pSoiv that will yivo Kiitlre lion. to follow the track of empire in its westward march for three thousand years. 1 stood but a.vfar uiro on the hill of (Jalvarv. I stood soon afterwarus on the Pira.'iis of Athens. Aijain I found myself on the banks of the Tiber. Still advancing westward I rested under the shade of the palaces of the Uintjs'of -England, and trod the 'streets of the now renovated capita! of France. From those capitals I made rny way at last to j Washington, the City of established empire j for the present generation of men, and of j inlluence over the destinies of mankind. [Applause.] Empire moves far niDre rap- idly in modern than it did in ancient times. The empire established at Wash ing ton 'is of less than a. hundred years formation. It was the empire of thirteen Atlantic American States. Stilt practically the mission of that empire is fulliUed. Tho power that directs it is ready to pass away from those thirteen and tilt hough 1 no man can monopolize the land which an- J other man is obliged to :ultivate, much less j the labor by which the lands or which your fields are cu tivated, you are en- tirclv arid estt blished and frrotmd- mise in 1854, would, if the eft'ort to establish slavery in Kansas had been successful, have been, after a short time, bold enough, daring enough, desperato enough, l.o have repealed the prohibition of the African slave And, indeed, that is yet a possibility now; for disguise these issues now before the Amer- ican people as they may he disguised by the I rd on .Democratic prin< iples. But you ail Democratic party, yet it is nevertheless per- 1 know, thut has not always been the history fectly true, that if you forego your opposi- of our whole country, ind, at times, was j tion and resistance to slavery, if this popular not the condition of an; part of it. Some j resistance should be withdrawn, or should, two hundred years vhcn laborers were j for any reason, cease, then the African slave scarce, and tho field to be cultivated was j trade, which at lirst illegally renews itself private citizens of the Atlantic States, j along the coastscf our Southern States, wo'd driven as they said by he cupidity of the j gradually steal up the Mississippi, until tbe British government, introduced! the-labor of j people, tired with a hopeless resistance, slaves into tho Arncricar colonies, and then I should become indifferent, and African sla- esUiblished the of land and labor, j very would once more become the n :arly the whole At- The system pervaded lantic Stales. If it had i ot been interrupted it would have pervade! the continent of America: and instead oi what you see, and of what you are a part and of what you do. instead of in from the eastern States, and although and exorcised un j der the same'Constitution and national i states into the prairies of the "West, and l of government, yet it is now in tho very act j iristead of fV  .asr o drariL'Sit ihau any other Tliov :irt> tnadt? that! any in ifin Wotorn vlow u.set! other plow .1 v. will sticky nny otli T ,1 Hats and Caps. BOOTS SI-IOI> CHEAT FOR CASH, AT New York merchant mporting1 laborers instead of freemen intc the sea-ports and slreteh away from their base to" the base of! dispersing them over the entire valley of the the Rocky Mf'urttains. The political power j Mississippi. That VOL Id have been the here condition of civilization on this continent, jfreat jit has been fortunate-; foi you, and fortunate lakes on the oast and the of tho liocUy for us, that such a dese f the "West Icdies, and through them the dominating political! power of the world. [Applause a voice, Our mission, if I may say that I belong to that eastern and falling empire, instead of the rising western one, tho mis- sion of the thirteen States, has been practi- cally accomplished. And what is it? Just likf. the mission of every other power on earth. To re- produce, to produce a new and greater and better power than we have been ourselves, to introduce on the stage of hurtiiin affair? twenty new States, and to prepare the way for twenty mote, before whose risin reatness and splendor colonized just at the s .me time that the Atlantic States were cok nized, and with the condition of An erica, a whole and entire new continent ub< unding in the most luxuriant vegetation ac 1 with the greatest resources of minernl w< alth, absolutely re- duced to a condition of -j erpetual civil war, and ever renewed mine .is desolation. The salvation of iNorth A me 'ica from all those all our own achievements pale and fade disasttrs that hava befall m the southern pat- ___ _ __ .1-. it i away. We have done this with as much forethought, perhaps, as any. people ever ex- ercised, fay saving the broad domain which you and these other forty States are to occu- py, saving it for your possession, and, so fur as we had virtue enough, -by surrounding it with barriers aainst the intrusion of ino- tions of the continent' li the result of bold and firm procedure on the part of your ancestors and mine, k s than a hundred years ago. The government of tfc 3 United States was established in an auspie ous moment. The world had become arou ed to the injustice V. St. Charles Hotel, E? SQUARE, MILWAUKEE. Proprietor. LKS. v iiiVh Corner of aad Ftrst Whitewater. Wiseonain. ________ _ j ranee, superstition, and slavery. [Applause.1 as as the cy of the system of 3i.werv j and the pcoj la of the United States" rising up to the Dignity of the deci- sion that was before ti. im, determined to prevent the further ei cnsion, as far and Because you arc to rise to the ascendant, and exercise r. dominatijiic influence, you are not, therefor-i, to cftit. ott' the ancient and honored thirteen that opened the way for you and marshaled you into ibis noble" pos- fast as possible, to secu e the abolition of stssion, nor are you to cast off the new i African slavery. It was under the influence States of the West. But you are to lay still i of a hi brofidcr foundations, and to erect stilt more j merit like noble columns to .sustain the empire which i ei nia, itself a slave Sta; y like the State of our futheis established, and which it is the New York, determined that, so far as her manifest wilf of our Heavenly Father shall ji power and her wiii couS  minds of interested parties as to the term.- .if adini.-sion to the approaching State Fair, I trust you will make room for the following statement in relation then to "Life Members and their families will fjo admitted free to all tho privileges of tho Fair, except as competitor? for Hpedal 1'ro- miirns. but will be required to pay the siruitf rates of carriage lultnis.Vion TLa payment of one dollar entitles tho person so paying it to the privileges ot" Ati- nuitl Membership, viz: n votco anil a voto at the regular Annual Meeting the Soci- ety to the privileges of exhibiting any- he may wish, except for special Pre- miums, as for instance on Trotting or anything else requiring un extra entry, as sein by the Premium List, and to six stii- gle admission tickets. But if ho be nut an Exhibitor, then, the one tiollar so paid shall simply entitle him to tho privileges of An- nual Membership and to four admission tickets. "Slefyer's will bo given to sucii persons as are necessarily required to take caro of animals cri exhibition, nmJ tho Supr-rinteiulcnt of the horse Department may give to any .Exhibitor in his meni, one Exit ticket of tha Fair; which siutll entitle hoUior to exit and nnc admission of horses, carriage und driver. Single admission wilt be, as heretofore, 2o cts. Children under fifteen years, half price under ten, free, if accompanied by parent or guarlian. fitmihf Tickets which were fonnorlv in IKS have been disc.-mlod on account of tho wholesale frauds of which they were tin: oc- casion one ticket often being used for tho benciituf half a dozen families, each compri- sing an unlimited number of individuals, The present system of requiring every onu to puy for what he gets prove in s-oino instances a little inconvenient and tmial.is- factory, but it certainly has tho merit of be- ing just and equal, and for this rosison, been adopted by nearly every Stnto Socie- ty in thf! Union. Private Carriages will br> admitted during the 1'air at single admission for carri- ages. 50 cU. but in every case aii pasien- gera ixcept the driver, will bo required to have Tickets of Admission. J. W. HOYT, W. S. A. S. TK.VAS. The (Austin) lustily over the result of the State election in Textt.i, saying We send to our sister Stales tho first note of triumph in the canvass for the Pres- idency. All our returns conic in indicating an r. valanchc victory for the arid Ltine Democracy. Our State ticket will be e1 by ten at leant. Tho revolution which hsti tinea last vetir, shows that the second sober thought of th; masses IA a, most complete repudiation of G' n. Sam Houston in Texas. Never u man fallen to low in short n tine. Everywhere the vote tho Democratic candidates with a hearty will that puts to flight nil the miserable and which have been indu triou-sly circulated them. tho Democracy of Missouri, of of Maryland, of'Nortb Carolina, of New Jer- sey, Pennsylvania, and ether kircp the 1 alt moving. We hare done our duty, and in November next we shall poll majority for Breckinridge and Lane. Gi EAT CANAL PROJECT. While Virginia about to to iu con- tummatiori, upon a grand scale, the Hive- and Kanawha canal, we that the -ntcrprisins people of IllinoU have in contf mplation the great project of con reel- ing the waters of Like Michigan with of the Gulf of Mexico, by an uninterrupted chaniet for ttcamboat narigation. Tlie cit- izens of Chicago bare revised the original scheme of the Illinoij and Michigan esnal, wbica comprined canal of sufficient capa< ity to float the largest of that ;ould the'lHinfjw river, bat wlisc i wftf given upfnr want of ftfter a cor sideruble portion of the work bad conttructctl upon that plan, and for ordinary canal only. probabU coct i j ml from ten to twenty mil- of concentration of the comi icrce of a Tojtt region in Chicago weiiis to warrant this gigantic en- ter prise. _ ___ Ei UCATIOX or nut Girk too frequently early taoght they forget tbe [euon. out- ThU U become are thai fa to be manly wiile their ptrptt- Mimoniihed tbat thU ii not or u until the? lorred to control thtfr tMtural to regaUU thdr eonduet hy nmH of 1 Is, wftita mocbof ntturml ttoaf Wt too BWBJ A W Jow Imwflt world   

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