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Waupun Times Newspaper Archive: June 8, 1859 - Page 1

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   Waupun Times, The (Newspaper) - June 8, 1859, Waupun, Wisconsin                               THE WAUriM TIMES, in Independent Republican Newspaper, U-roM I" l.it'-rnliiri" nutl (ii-m-rnl iNi-wn. unil oiion I r I'.'litii-iil uml ll-l.-tni itmy (ju.-i-lioii'., ISVCBLISIIKK MUKMMi, AT WJS. j RBrlnkorhofl, Publisher lHllr' In Sew UulliltiiKvHoorfx Illuck. O-n. DOLLAR .vvi, Kirrr Cuvr-i ri.it AXNUM ir nil' Ai'i'vsir: in-, rtnii ir run ximn.x r yonTiis TIIUKI. AITLUTHI: uf OIITMK. _ of "ii" j .ir, J.'.O Oft "li'1 Ji-ur. Illl 0') On" f 'iirll'  ''.ir, in UO .njlilli 15 00 Muir- "in; jcrxr, lu 00 On, iii.tn- wi.-k. 1 l.o i-ii 1. 1 ni tiMiTiii.n.  llitt IK- iii-tl mi itlli, tnt-r Mi T. Cnn II Imp. III.' In i.l' Win; iilii-i, In i "ii-iilt.-.l lu nil tl .sh.H.l! I, 4. I' Itl'lllllV JII'l- I "ml niirnini Hi- I" iii-ili-r'ls llii'lul UM-1 ii.n. niiiUlin t ,'tl, i. ii air! at L-tw, Notary I'uMi. >n.I I i-iil.....HI X. II i I.I l.iil I I I s j ATTOKNKY A'I' LAW, .lllllF III (V. (I lit I I .1 X.....I -.III I JOHN I'll, Mti'iiii-y ami I'" nl l.iv-., .Vi.i.in 1'ulilie, unit lii-m-i'-il ill, I.'ivxcll, K'niinly, nn ii d' ('utility li. I. isi. u-Klil ii.i.n. I rhvsii'inn and Wau: un, NYh.i .il lintli'ilioM i i'-u I .II'KI.MI.X II I 'I H ri-v-'n-iiin soul >'u ji- .n.-- v Miii-i' at in- i t 1 i ll-ii xt u-.. 'I. I., M. MI.C: inx-i-i, Mi. .-.mi I i.i tli- l'it-. Ili-x. Mi. Mr. A.J. Sp.'ar, Mi.M. M flint. ill Ki-nil ilil l..ii- I il KM .1 XX, Mil I.MI nn. Kroin the llonto Journal. M I N N 1 E 11V I II.I Y I.IER. IVitli tlio tratliiiK robos of Aiul tin- liuum'iiiK uf tliu bi'O Will] themiM, (tuliuiouti iiuininir, tin- "i-.i, C'liiiH-u nu'ir> With in In i- nn-lliiu- mivvtiii-M AV'Hh a tulry'R urtli-hH Kr.mt-. Sinu, yi> lifriln, your smft "-t inii-.ii; Hum, vi- ilrmVHi, liltl Diiilini! MIIIIIIV. Mliilili-, whercHoirur .von fiiithor liloSHonn-j Ijlo-ivoini, For yuur cLuimH, u-nl.li- i Imir 1 I'n IIjr pliiln ami il.ilnlr il n .v-nir bn.w, rtn uoulioni falrl Fill iKHi'l- ivitli hi 11111 itflirr, til- lull-unil In.in rln-iK'lh; llllll'.- Mil lillM'H, IliM II lllli, t'riMii cu ,1 uiiil lhnpi.1 ct ll-i. f-int', lilrf's, j'inir iviif-ir; Muni, Vi-ilruw-iv, Dill luijr Mlnnli', .Milihlo, M'hlllll'r UUI AH il.' slujr. Julns nn inn v-lu.v Willi tliu lliiuini: nl I'.ll-t'il I'lVI Iv 1-OulllM'iV, n IVll -liii "ii Mm Illicit stnr, liii-u ti uh. SIlitllM Hill- III tlK- UIIIWIl oflilltl. IIiippvMlnnlo, nnnl wiUi tli.it ci-K'-itiiil tlirnng, Xou 3on [n.-tti- n ih-in.-r injitiiti-, inn n nvvi-i-tci ihe Brigand's Child. sull remained suspended over the precipice' iiinl crying aloud fur his falher losuvc him. Thcmuthur hung upon the brigand's arm, und endeavored to move him from his pur- pose. Nature triumphed, nnd he cried, Givo 'me my child nnd go." And what sceurily fehnll I have fur my 1 enquired. The brigand's was Bnrossini's reply. Seeing that I hesitated, he continued You do not know me. You have not heard of Michael Barrussini, or you would have kiiown timt bngarid though lie be, IIH word has never been broken. Bui here, lie continued, throwing dagger Inward-, me, lake that and the boy with you till my men shall have- placed in safety." The nobleness.of thio net ton was in slri king contrast with his previous I took the dagger nnd giivo my honor thai the boy should bo relumed in I expect Bnrossini replied, "so long as the boy is safe, you are safe also Jle lookbd at the boy as if willing to em- brace him. but evidently thinking that llie notion might make me suspicious, he HIPS Wed his toolings But the mother could -__-__-. not nssurno such heroism. She saw the boy in .ny vvh'le the other hell the brigand's dagger, and she carne towards HYMN KOR THE EKOPI.K. id) r. I'K.it 1-; A X.D 3P 31 3ST If si 33 I Druggist A.vr. Apothecary. l: uf DRUGS IMUOI li-ilii tin- .111111.11; iil-n.., -I. M.II I.Ini ry. .NVnl'i I'n'.t, inn) ----O T I, Ijtint tinj I'luiidtinl fJuniplirne T was jonrnpving somp of tlu> 1Oillrcriiif upfl i-onnilitic .-Ceneiy nl Iy, xx1 lu-n my suddonlv stopped, and his iiiiuix. -d Inukn plainly in iented danger. It was piist mid-day, nnd wo wem iinpntietit to rench our di'slinntion 010 nightfall. J had scniculv n.-kod the po-iilums v.hat had i e- icii-ioncd lliu stoppage, vxheii n bullet ixvh past u-, and (unking in the rlircc- .'lion vvln-iiuo It dime. 1 sn'.v a or limn! lien'e looking fellows, xxilh presented ulle-, Inkingami lit u.-. lYii'tixing denlh to b" so near, and de-iroti- nl jixeiting it, 1 Miimfiid li> iho hi inv mess to nive up nil I po.-.-cs-si-il, tiiid required the pioscrvniion of our MX Wuids had tlie ellVet of uneMing the brigands purpose, and ihcv came doxxn from their position, informing I'oWex er, that we must uccoiiipuny them lo their coinliiiiiider, who had .-uldiiinly sxxoni lo kill every Englishman tell iniu hi-. i ASA in.II, I'., i J'.IM'n xv r 1.1 ...s. i in d'.'i. (iin.'.'.ii s, llardxvjirc, '.I K II I't .1 I XUn, .111 1 I 'll.'l 1., I. II II i A v.-.w. j r.i'M xii.mi- Cloths, ........I. Ill-l X. -1 I. v I II ill.I It I i -.I. ,.li ..r I. i. .1 I i :'......i 11 W.itluy. r.i ra ur .tr.r. t'-nt .1 -j-nn, CII.H li. fnniitni.', [H-lilar, l.i-atlioi un I lir.-i i.in arnlr.hv.-i. H li U S II I-, I'.u'it. ,-n-h. .M.itl.liitf. Ciuiu-r II. III. 'I "I'll. S. ill. Illl'l Clolilll. K.IM- mil Tull, r I iil-n I n l..n-p> .-Mck -n nil 1'i.piilnr Patent Medicines of the Day. 'i Toil' t nnilj''aney leu! ll.i 1 J -II1. HUH Mr.r.oiMM TMI.IIK in I. I, til; MI MERCHANT TAILOn, In I. ml I. ii i ,rli i, i i.-. I, in I', V ,11, -It. t. V. un. i. U I.I i I.I.I II I.I'. r i t a I, ll A ji II t II I! V !l I1 .M..III -i. u i.i., u. i.. 111. re {Liquors: Ii i. t> 111. mi'! IV. Hi in.Iiis. Hull "Olil'l'inn" .M. -I'liE llll.ii' I Itlllll-.. JIM, IlKIUII llllll I'.il- ,-h MI. I'm i.ml. IM OKI Ml ilmvi- mi- in i nn 1" li i-i in iiitttu-- to tint riHtuiiiL-i-n. Illl Ill .ill'l T-i, i in i Hi mi 111, rim-nix, iii.i'ih'iii'i uml ti'L- nin i GROCERTES! Fx-niii.Y m-ixvl.1. r.i.i'1 v-ii I. _ii'-.. III. i- ir. h. Mi Illl l.ill-l-. 1.1 -I'M I'liii'tl.'-- i li-iiil. n-li. XX hir. J'.'aler in I IriM'ci it1-, .Mi'dieinc-i, i'.i ni..mi., i u, i, IM i- :i' >i is 1-11 -i in -n iv, .ill Uiii'li i Mlnu..r n SMi'. All ill I'Klri-.s. ol I'. .IS, M: iiMi! "I nil ii .11. in u Hi -t l I lull ivll I. X 11 VX i I 1 1 [Vali r in f.indii--,  llu.t. I II 'VI V XII I.I.I'.S, i [J'.iler in (i i-rit'-.. 1'im I Vm, -I, I'M, I .iv I... I I CIIIIM' Full U r.. i M'hrnl Dittlvr unit at tin- lltxlivnl .Hiiiki I'rlcc. nil n'i'1 -s i MUI- in; i.h. ul UK- OlilStani! nn -tit-i t. HOH-.II sitli i '.V. V ilenlri1 '.IILCS llll.l fi-h. lil.ml, I'.iiirainl I'i-lalili-h-: I.I........l I ,ill. I.I II II... XV.'lK l m'i, iiil u.. i'. h. 1 AI.ill 't i I'linip M.iUr anl Well Dull.-r, M.iin-t., AT Tin: Ms i Slitlioiicry or l ll'tai l J J U U G Sri s D 1 C L N E S .-r xuivu r. v i .n i i in all Kind-, ol' Haidwarc, i II I 11 i .J1, i. ,t t Mi i li mti t. ill. 1 i n 1-1 x oi v i u. I I'.i'iiif.ictiii'.'r ol i'l i- .nl I VI .1 i J 1 1.1 vnri.s 11.u. I :m 1 ILirin--" Noxt dnoi j C..1I, I'MIH'I.. M.II" MH-I-I v. vt i.ii '.v- l.ivf-v tin' KM li V nn -'I I. Il' i I -i.'il. i- v i. i- .1 ii..... i-lit......-. iiii- I xv n. M vs. 1 r .1- II, I '1 l.lll'l u.: IM-' T iiiun, mil! J'lluni. O li .S O 3ST DE! H. "ST, i> AM> n Ilii- Kf asonaMe Prices me, beseechiog me lhat I would permit her to kiss her child. Tho look, the tone, the action of the woman were all so touching, that what little heroism 1 may liax-e possessed forsook me; and phicinsr the trembling boy in his mother's urm.s, I ciied: Jiarossini, I will not take away your The brigand's features relr.xed not, but. tifipr regarding me for some seconds, he re niatkixi: You shall not Iiisc nnything, English' man. by your humanity and your I'or'ihe feelings of tin) mother of my cliild and tin n mining towards his men, he 'jiivu them some directions, and as thex departed, he entrcnted me to remain with him u few moments. I am glad to see you him; so much confidence in an lie said. You have wen rny admiration.'' Thu now returned, and Haros- r, in order to I'uvongo the death mo ihnt they wore .eady tu conduct me to the roml, and that they hi.s brother, who hud (alien in an action xvith a party of Hngliohmeii sonic days bo fore. This was not pleas.int intelligence; my life .seemed oi.ly spared a m inieiir, tiie biigands ab.suied me lhat. their chief iniphicablc, nnd my guide had previoim'y entertained me xvitli buine naiiativesuf llie t'bioeily of Michael IxiroSsini, lliu recullec- lion of which (served to the tes- liniony of tho robbers, 1 iifti'i-vvaid- learned that this savage chiet had ouleied his men lo brinii eveiy Kngli.-hnian found on the road bet'oic hui', that hu liiix'u the luxiliy of [uitling (hem t.i detilh himself, und that txxo belore he hud Miuriliced a fellow cuuniiyiuuii of mine to his revciigo. I was bliiiilfoldiiJ, and c-md. civil llir gLidcs and iiiv.neb lor .-mill! conaiJeiablu time, and when the hniidkeicliiet' xxas la- ken from my eyes, 1 tuiiiid myself in pro-, of the dreaded biu lie wn- a n.an JJu-bnel proportions, wall exes, and in.it- led lucks il.ickly tailing oxer Ills sunburnt clieoksj. Heeded me vxith savage i-roeity but thoc was. .still buiiielliing in Iii.s appear- ance xxhieh led mu lo expect lliiil my ap- peal ti> his meicy would not be inell'ocUiiil ijul the ucalii ot liid biothur too young in his memory, und all my words were ol no aviiil. 'J'he blood miiit be .shod" he Kind, to oatint'y my murdoiud brolli- er I'jiitrcaties weie of no avail J l.o was linn and M'.iuluiu, nnd having given mu n tVxx in. lot prepaia ho mined axxay to Joinllo tils child, n boy about lliiee yeai.- nld, xxh'i came lunnlng tovxai'is linn. 1 llioughl it strange thai idler deciding up- on .suuii un alroeuHi> noi, ;i'id xvitli ihe ex- should ultend mo so far us there might be the least danger of fulling in with the brig- ands of his party. I thanked him and a'-ked cne favor, that ho would return some ETC. 8TIIABI. Nat to tx> liloHt wllli win riur TI> wli-lil tliu nworil uml wimr thu Or rine loconriucrorVfutncivt length, rrocltiiiii the yooii or make thv To powur to lililu the ncorn, rlMi ul.ovo the hut? and Krifo Ol thoiiii to wt-nlth nail tttlq hum. In ;he crowned of our IVhat nre tho lint prop H The lilaarmy'a To ul Hunt, tllHt ilmn-i4 to Hprln'g Ami ahtnv tho lumnil-cli ill the man. nnd tho niftn of Rrnit, trong nA the heHitii of reiitnia they Mile, Spurt UK tttoy in.iy with fortuuu'n clmrm-, Tlit-y aru lllCi5 kavu upon the tMo. In ilini olil they Ho, Tho li- ist of Bilimi'i- iilij tluc iy, While ihe true lieuti-th liiuh And thront.-.-! itrifll upuii to-day. Olve niu thu innti whobO huntls have The cnrn-HCcd to the Whuau lei-t tlm lori-al havn crosiit.1, Urliuiu bruw in nohly orowu'ct with toil. The Opening of Parliament. BIIITISII AIIISTOCKACY. Col. Hiram Fuller, who i-j now in Eng- land, writes to the New York Tribune some very graphic letters. We copy fr.'in one of them a description of the scene at ihe opening of the British Par- liament To witness the spectacle of the Open- ing' was the principle-motive that had hurried me up to London and on arriv- ing, I found that all admission tickets had been disposed of for several clays. Uut my friends went to work in my be- half; and soverul gentlemen in influcn tial positions made personal applications to the Lord Grand Chamberlain for -one more ticket.' It was in vain his Lord ship adilr sscd me a very po'ite note ex- pressing his extreme regret.' Mr. Moran, the gentlemanly and obliging Secretary of the American Legation, also exerted himself to tliu inmost without success. But there was still a power which had not been appealed to; a power 'mightier than the a power which no popular Government can afford to Power of the Press. A line from Herbert Ingrain, Esq., M. P., the propiiutor of the Illustrated London .News, cariied me through ihe long line of policemen, door-keepers, and othhr officials, into tho Reporter's Gallery of the House of Lords, the very best possible position for witnessing the august spectacle. And what a pageant of splendor and of grandure was here presented The floor of the House was c iiiiiituros which wero among the proper- i with tho wives nnd daughters and t.y tho brigands bad captured. They will return them to was nnruSaiiii's reply. "Firevvoil." I tho little urchin that had been the instrument of my preservation, nnd de parted. On my arrival in lho road, 1 found lliu chaise exactly on tho spot where ir iiad stopped, will) the guide and posli! ions in wailing. But what surprised niu most of all, was to tine! that not an article nf my properly was missing. Tho brigand hud rcstoied the whole. sisters of the Peers, in full dress leaving only a narrow space in fie centre which .was occupied by Peers and Bishops, in their brill ant scariet robes. The entire gallery which surrounds the House was filled wiih a row of elegantly dressed ladies, only broken by a line of llepor- tcrs, occupying seats directly opposite the Throne. Behind the the benches, one rising above another, were filled with ladies. The RoofceT CHbttfUv. thaf important poaition known fiorn iwMtktferVtttkw the Buffalo Commercial AdTwtiMf, fcy Hon. James O. Putnam, of The British Li.W, when it took tar to itself and" threw Ttrifa admirably imitated thtt royal "t made a like Jivi among the contestant beasts, takivf tin chief share to himself. Standing it docs nt the Straits, and connaanding their entrance, it 'is an important adtrnn the power of- England. It is whether she would long retain her. possessions if she had not control of tkk gateway to the East. Lone may fcoW it against all her foci, and long way continue 'to govern an empire scs are incapable of self government. anA who have no government by their fit to be 'called legitimate Probably the greatest piere of tllibulrr- ing perpetrated in the modern conquest of the Indiea, and al- and left duty to it cannot be that the world is the better and the pier for the- forcible by tM descendants of the ter who laid in rxce the foundatiooa ot the best civilixntimi the world ever knvw. L'his general proposition. I maintain, ia led her to and fiom' the thri-nc; and during the ceremony'snt a little clistahc.e on the Quejn's left. He npjuafed yery stiff und and is not its' good- looking as artists have" generally repre scnted His' head is quite bald; on the top, and his'whi.lc appearance indi cates liis subni-dina'c ing one of "tlie severe satire of tho'pietxire of 'the Prince' Consort in" his OrReial robe demit. The gentleman of England, who were present on ihe august occasion, did not particulurly impress me as men of urea i personal dignity nnd power. I no! records behind them, and although head as massive as Wetelei's ns no'ble as of ber Mgfc Clny's, or as striking as Ualhoun's. Anlong the Peers, Lord Derby looked most like ii leader; but among the Bishops, I saw no very marked evidences 'of divine or human 1 and, as for the Duke of Cam bridge, the m lilnry head of llie army. iu> phrenologist would select him from a i-rowJ us one born to command." But i.f the nobility are decided'y bettor looking than their lords. 1 have never before seen sa large a lol'.eclion of fine, fresh, rosy- locking woine'n. The majority Inive fail eyes, exuberant busts and luxuriant heads o! ha r On omiiiij out of the House of the crowd was very great, as a .va- wry slow j but it affords a fine r iimtx a tur a ivlight look into the faces and oyw. of the leading belles of England nnd ul though there was danger of being smother ed in a crowd of set 1 suppose ii would have been like "dvjng of u in aromatic pain." In the diplomatic benches, none of lho Ministers were more conspi- cuous than Mr. Dalhvs in his plain suit, and snow white hair; und die pomp looking Duke of Mahikctf, with his iron grey beard and jet black moustache. The Duchess of MalakofF, who was seated next the Duke of Cambridge, is not so painfully jfovrmf the being b.-autil'ul ns 1 had imagined her to be, from newspaper reports. She would f-cnrcc Iy make a sensation in the Fifth Avenue. But of pirlicular peisons, 1 shall be rfble i.o speak more purticulaily when I havoscen more of them. Th.e Cause of the War. firm as the Hock of tlii-t brings me to show how well fortitrd ii is, for ninny a man rounded rhetoric with this flourith, without slightest idea of the strength be claimed for his j' ine, then, n rock about miles in length and a mile in width atibo point, nnd seventeen hundred in height at it  upliiied, nnd'di-liuioucies are fully counterbalanced with u. Justice of the Peace, 01 u r i mi K. i i'l.i. n: i-ou IKIIICI: col l M i s i o i; o i> i'- n I'.n- ilir -line nt nrh. .v< i- Ifir u -I' .I'.'... r, t S. E. STOD2ARD. i T A !l I' I' t< I t! Moilnrr, .Mnrnlliiin i i' i i-n A.-.. ,t, .XII l-n-l'-'-r M-j M A ji i.. in fii.ii nii ii.I'll ii- I t. I-Al'l At-vll-j  ever fancy you have licaH U.a nity rough and hardy mariner; nnd so the or- der instantly sounds to put ihe ship Scottish bag pipes" becausj you listened to the blind pip.-r at ilic utretl and presenilv'a b .at puts ,-ff, wUm to give a ai o-is" lo bear d upon ihe wieck Axxav be forgiTen.) afier that drifting hulk, thc-c gall.iiii men through lliu swell of a roaring sea ;l Dc.in Swift, hearing of a carpenter I they shout, and no.v a strange rolls through ihu of n house wbUtt out of lhat canvass screen against the loo he xv.is ,n dryly shroud of n broken ma.st. lla led into tlm li'nt go' through hit work boat, it proves to bo the trunk of a m; n j Pr" beni liuad nnd knocs together, fo dri-dj nnd shmvh-d as to be h.irdly fe.lt within! Wo-me.; heard of a rich in 10 who the clothes, and so light, that a m jm.'badly injured by being run over. It it is laid o i tho the s-iid he, thjt I mind; that emphasis and discretion and meant xihat she uttered. ]5ul sounded odd to hear that little worn n talk so supremely of her power, !ier authority, her army, her navy, her minis- ters, her people, etc., cto. And ye theie was a touch of the moral subli ,ie' in tlio dramatic situation of the in ihe p-dpablc evidences of the surround- ing 'divi which do U hedge a Q-o n Queen Victoria is rather a pleasant-faced woman, her eye being learn that blessed licing it. save .-.no'hcr. O, Uiilt th.it Mid a perwn lo Be d..i.y prac- jS replied tho wit; "but if you over be tolled.'' "o human Legislature have power to abridge or doslriy rights 'which God Dr Franklin in summoning up t He do- nnd Nature have eslib'-iihed such as life- meatic evils of drunk and liberty j commit net. kenness, lho owner him -elf shall! without windows, gardens without amounts to u for-1 fence-, fields without tillage, wiih- rojfi chilJren without loaruinjj priocv morals and manners." brst feature, bho is a little below ihe medium height, with a very full, but no', disagreeably fat figure. Her movements are exceedingly graceful nnd dignified; and although she gave no s-igns ot i cog- Give brains ami riches', and he is! a kii'g; give him brains without and he is-n slave; give him richos without brains, and he t'-ol. LEAD. The ce'eHfa'cd An r w Mar he man who "tosk a UM i t'icr day, brought it but ext day look a ride and went off with it. nition while seated on the thiouo, yet in, vi ll. in hi- imiresilMilvl upo'i passing out she bowed smilingly to her -aid; into i Fln'tery is a E friends on cither ride. Prince Albcr alf so inor'.al as when t' uad-jd into which our sorl of bad to currency.   

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