Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Waupun Times Newspaper Archive: August 4, 1858 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Waupun Times

Location: Waupun, Wisconsin

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Waupun Times, The (Newspaper) - August 4, 1858, Waupun, Wisconsin                               THE WAI PIN TI1ES, Owwrml Ntrnp, KYKftr WftPKKXHAy AT Brinkerhoff. Publisher A Proprietor. TERMS'- ASJI ttrTT Civrd us TWO AOUIIU ir r I 1WO POLL fit IV IX fMtf Kate A of colaniDt out- fi'io fj'jrth of a column, -W 00 20 W) IS 00 1'J OO 1 CO r-v> f or our year, O..D Kfju.irr, uiii' c.tcli ttiibtnturnl Inner tlon, rjr'N, uol flvo Ihifv, I jwr, A 00 noticct. a 00 at italntv price. not acfompAnfod In; lu-M-rfiMl until niH rli.irnrel .ul v or User H confined to tholr fnri ijj.-j.. ivlvcrtltiJnic in ui-'vtv fitr regular cnch'iuarlT JH h fur trlvurllilnK will p-iularrtl fitinrtcrfy. ,il' unlit fur. 2 insDmro: JOUX ttorji-y and Counselor at Law, Nnlan .iii'i ffi-acral -Agnit, Wuupun, Win- or. Ullicc, nrxl door cast of Oliver's Store. Kcftu.so. Business men of Uoi'.n1-' gc ____ Attorney aud Counselor at Law, Waupun, Wji All 1'iitciitt'Ml lo hln will inrnfn) nltiMlllDU. OWculll Attorney Counselor at Law, Notary Public an I 'Jmu'r.il Cullcctlnx Ag'iHt, Wii. Justice of the Peace Oilico at the ASA SXYUEK, M. D., Mil! Civulc, County, Widconsin. Ji'KGMIAII LOOK, M. i'iiyKtcian and Surgeon. Oilico at his .M'lvni.u, voit of llnrilwuro Milu ulrcot. 1 L. I'hyMuinn uud Surgeon, Wis. at HiiIlDrBold'a brut Store. 1 D. W. MOOUK, i'iiy.iician and Surgeon, Waupun, Wis. Oiltoi nt lilit ivitliltnro un strt'ol, iluor f-.iT. J i 1 II. K. OSUOUX, I'octor and Surgeon. Office in Sumnor'i- M.UU Wnujiun. 1 11. CVK, i'liybician ar.d Surgeon, tenders his profcs mil tl M' to tin, ciElxviiH of Waujiiiu vicinity. .U IM'.ti rlici'lV I'rviK SUiti'. 1 W. I'. llf.-'IO.V, in Dry Goods, Groceries, Hiirdwaro. C. 11A.NK J t KIICIIA.S r dealers in Olothsi. >.f i U-M.nlu uliti M-: t 'J-.nlimi Mun-, vorii'T of Mritn unu Jons Mfui'liANT dealer in ilft'ft, I U. I.. Ol! NiERCHANT TAILOH, M iln -tn-l, i. W. llt'lTKUHKI.Ii, r u i t a ii d A I1 I h c i- .1 r v M ..iMf-.t, W.ui-llil. HI-..MI1III. TIMES. J. II. BBINKEHHOFFj PnblUhejr and Proprietor. "GO IN, AND WIN." Per Aiimim. In Advance. 1. WAUFIIN, AUGUST d, 1858. NUMBER 45. Business Cards. EXCHANGE HOTEL, JUIn ttrrot, tVuurmii, Yin. A. 11AKOBH, American Day. STEARNS A ST. I. US, Fioprlelorn, PH. JAJIKSJ 1'. I'KINCK, n A 8 I A M: K aI- r I c e AT T 11 r. OF BRANDON whore he In to utt-ixl toltio dutk's of hl.i iit-ofes- ilou wllli Ilio nlinoit punctuality. n. HKCi.wn. A. nussisoN. SIXCI.AIU A r.HSNISOX, to Younx A H' HO LKSAL E G K GCE A' ,S', And In Glnm-Wino, Xnilii, 1'uUy, Ac., 13 01 sf., Mihviiul.ee. yl L. J. 1IOJJAHT 4 CO., Wholesale 1) a n 1 r> r s In C i p n. r N i '1'obHvco, 11, iVc. I.. J. HoUAIlT. 11. o tlio Wnlkt-r J. JET. Teacher P.aiio Forte '.M MAY 1S5T. Xunics limy be left ul L. U. Doilgc's .Store. SI, W67. la E. F. PJLiACK, HOUSE A iVD SIGN -A. I IT 0? MBAINEU AND Ul.AZIF.lt ii. Public, A.ND COMMISSIONER OF DEEDS for tliu Stale wf Yurli, (i COKKRCT I tie llcconhnf the TuiL'iw of Wmtji'm and anil the nf Waiijiim. EDWIN HILLYEH, A7 o T A n y p u n L i c, Land, Insurance Collecting tlgcnt, OIIK'o over OiMlgD'H h'tnrf, Ciilinty, WlncoiiHliu >tc., uxe'riitcft. Vir InMimnct' flTccti-'tJ on Klii'lw of rrupcrty in (fjl I'llLST I'l. ASS II ntlfiii) tliivim; uii'l .Vlllng Liui'ln, I'lU'lnf TiiM1', Ai1.. (.'oni-Cli'MIH Irtntll" Illlll (Hl'Li'tlMl KMBII tiro. A Co.. ilmi. II. I.. I'lilmer, n'ni. llnl'kirli. liiiiipuii: H.MI. H'm. M. in-it- I'n'.i'li .M-AUV.'. t'levvliin.l. if. II.HK, r.iv H.MI ciriiin .IHIH-IH-. J nil-mi, w itin: n. .v. Him. tji- vk" Tor n TV Ji a g e MUM ANDUtlW ritOl'DFIT. n -MA i -i-ri'.iur. I'-i'-T AJ'1'i' v, Jtniii ,iin-cl I WM H'Jt'KlKK, ,i A'litivin: T' a'c. I'VuiU CAPITAL -50.000. i-- v T f> Mm. i v vii'. 1 ui.iwn on Now 1 ui'K', hunt' '.'li'n-.igo aii'l i t rti-.o I'iiiciol'Kiir'-pf. Beautiful Sket Jtotter trttflt, und boitocotveil, And weop that trunt.und is a second Orpheus Tlitn doubt ono lieart, that if spirit-stirving, love Ilwl blnwci tmo's lifo tvilh true conquers the most in vet Oh, fn thlfl mochtnu world, too Terpsichore; >vhosc mngic s doubting fleini o'ertnhofl still sighs, dry tears tm cheated tu tho and move the stones Thnu loiw tliu blouMutl IIOJHJ of bas wiiltcn waltzes I -4wn mo than many operas.1 Iu thore is oltuu mdro. A Gem in the as many heavy scores fullness of syrcti ben A young mother, with tcnrs of mine of poetry; what an i iiont in- her eyes, stood ovor Ilio river of ever gushing melcdi It'dtli, gazing wistfully into its bluuk melody nloue the rythn sluggish wivtcrs us if sho would fain influence scixcs the b icr gaze upon some object nway down the heart. His violin is a in its fa 'hornless dejjlh. She he draws from the otig and wistfully. tlie blade waves oiled aulleuly, sluggishly soul brightest joy and aud miugles them with mnstc And tho motlier luid iier hands with which be draws tljes sively on her bosom mid and tones from his instiumc 'JJy com t my gem which touches tho gi And a colestinl being, like tin the healing bnleom of jo. stood near the door of bur heart, and wings to mount up into tl )cred in n silvery voice like There aro many waltz- "What scekest thou mourning sister rich in melody, but few as i "Alas snid ihc mourner, "I once, rylhni as those of Straus wore n beautiful gem in my To me it wan invaluable; it wna no rivinl gem; it was 0110 that kings humming, waltzing, dancing, so inviting, HO irrchis dancer withstand'ihcir w iioimrcbs might have been wot] proud He is the idol of woma Plic riches of the Knst could not on every piano in nirchased it from inc. In nn hour waltzes. He has wri ivtts to me evil and miserable, the all arc favorites, all Iropped from my bosom into tho and played through night of Iliis deep river. As I saw and' dandy- hum and touting away from me, gently us the and barrel-organ pin; ng of an eastern shadow, I reached nfler them in tlie street, at i.lu .nit it was beyond iny grasp, and my and at the theatre. uy bnbe, smiled upon me us it was carry them on tho 3D the waves farther and farther from siiout Strauss forever. t bognn to sink to sink from my Strauss, this wnltii-hci ind in a moment my gem was gone of a count. Sophie w jono forever nnd .she turned suuly eyes was bluer than Ita And the angel voice whispered again: softer than the sweet ligl "Slay, my sister; grieve not; look star. Grace and beauty w n to the dark and in OYOIJ She looked as she was bid, and ,1 cry Sophie beautiful. wcot rapturous joy buist from her lips. given worlds to win but 'Tlumka to the father! I see my love; but she was cold lonting iu a gicat wave. O may L indeed, for a mu vcnr it iu my bosom again but his violin, to dan "Stay, rny mister; tliou art Sophie, had a vluit thou scc.st in the river is not thy gem ancestors as lie had walizc t is the shadow oi' was given theo in rit.-.t. Look, sister, heavenward, and said Sophi he caino to give her brothci a 1 hy mouruinr; bcuvl fhe scarcely deigned She looked aloft, nnd away up in the lurk, beclouded sky, she saiv a single afterwards Sophie WH to Count llobort, Cliuin ,lenr aiul blur, and in it a briglit stnr wa.s gleaming, aiul its silvery rays came down ind gliiiicing on die gloomy river, indeed as many provul imc pliie, but beyond tliohe and h nothing of which he could bo; black wavos a brightnoss as of siivoi i i .1 r i __ .1 day when Strauss ch themselves, that art) more Iu seven of his Ami not talisman by tlopihs of the deepest wo, r-Iiml'd.- The giief-torn soul ind lends melt- n. Ju every Vienna, lie ten over two lire sung and Europe, e them; m. We ll, in (lie The dancing tlioir shoulders was lior name. Jn a would glance Uc one and as many no- Sirauss played and played, and will never .stop this wonderful waltz, which so fear- fully aftttds both him and them. They dunce and dance; ho played and suddenly the E of bis violin snaps, and in Unit moment Sophie fulls dead upon the floor. Violin nmi bow fall from his trem- bling and with n cry of horror he shrioked, "Sophie1." and he fell fainting on tho ground Since Sophic'o death the walln is called by her name; Slruiiss loved hnr tilt his Irresolution a habit vrLit-li crcep-i up- on its victim with n fatal facility. It not vicious but it lends to vioo, and mtnr it fine henrt h.ts paid tW penalty of it at the scaffold. Trifling it appear in the wavering ike. u they older its form changes to of k monster, wliicli lowls them U- destruction with their eyos The idler, the spendthrift, the epicurean ihc drunkard, arc among its victims. hapa iu the latter, its nffects in tliu most hideous form. He. knows that igoblet which he is about to drain i; poison, j yet he swallow-, it. He knows, for the J ample of others has ininted it in glurinp j colors, that it will deaden all hit the strength from his j happiness his lieait, oppress. Lim I with foul di-soaau and Imrry his progreai j lo a dishonored grave, yet he drains it nn- i dor u species of dreadful spell, like that One of the most, alarming feiiluien u( i by which siunl] creatures are to ap- the present age is the laxity of parenla! pruach and leap ir.lo the jaws th G-ood Advice. Kat ouly w liul H ill foo.1, Drink otily wt.At uili tloyuu you can l.oihl only wliHt will rcwloretl Then you will havoiio lo I a fool on Parental Restraint. death. Uc 'loo, is now dead, but restraint. The result Is found in the very .loathsome serpent, whoso' fiendish elmm.ini' Sonhic .rnltz lives vet. i chnwctor ot our fnnnlies, and the'have fascinated them. How beautiful and charming Sophie vraltss lives yet. and extreme youth of many of the criminals; raanly is the power by which  niul I M I uud f. of Ilinlln nil ItiiUii1. I I't-jucrs in all kiud.s of Hardware.! M.II-. t will Unit It In llu'dr nilviinf v 1" TlldJIAS Nniiii''iu''uror of PI ir.s and Aijiii-uitui'.'il. T II IS CO M F A N V luviN'i :.u" m.cosu. and Widely Known 4 s-r n i CT ivy wnrin sot.nMT I'ATKOXAt! JC or run: FVIOJKKS OF TUB STATE. T CAKl-KNTblt, r-., 1 11-r .in.! Harness Maker. NV.t door AI.I, l.OSSIW PRUMPTLY 1'AID. of tlm I'M'i Hunk. M.iln I j'oi.rc'TKs issuKn A A 1.1.IS, IMITII Tin: in'it.ictuvei' ol airnnt (ot all VwfTf'H'fT R T ..r Ilii- flrHt V '-Lit u. OJuTJ.A'J Mill, m _..._-. JIMIN OFF CErtS s tho Boston Jons WAUK, I'rcsiJciit, irr -i t. All il.Mic! ,r   In sli- pl.K-i1 J-.HWAHO K.MtKKR. A 1 rCS t, UUDUll. i .irfa-viliir Jitl'-uttiMi to lio. 1 _______.......________..... _ >S Bi.v, .1 rc.vurcr, Ai nupun. B. 11 iu.s, Act. director. RAKKKK' i HIM-VRR. Beautifully Said, Wo make the following beautiful extract )ii ihu Homeslond Exemption law, from a written bv ;i dislingnishpd Judge of Tennessee: "Secure lo each family whoso labor may have acquired it, a little spot of fresh earth lhal il may cull its will be nn asylum in times of adversity, from which lhi> mother and the children, old ago and iiilV.tiey; liin still draw susteimnco and ob- tain protection, though misfortune may rob thorn of nil else, and they ffcl they still mi.' entitled to walk the green enrth and the free air of heaven, in defiance of the potency and power of ac- cuimilutir.g wealth and domineering of the pretending nnd ambitious. The sacred- of that consecrated spot, will make thorn warriors in lime of external Those nhockii of corn, says Xor.ophon, in- spired those who raised thorn lo defend them. Tiie largest of thorn in the field is a in the middle of the state to crown the conqueror. Secure a home to uvoiy family whose labor may obtain one, against the weakness, vice or misfor- tunes of tho father.0, and you rivet the all'ectionsof the child, in years of manhood, by a .stronger tie than any consideration that, could exist, lie will remember where he gambolled in his early youth, the stream upon whose banks ho left u mother's home- s cad whero sloop the loved and the lost." I'M. tell you how it is with the pictures of women we fall in love with at first sight. Tbc reason why a man is not desperately in love with ten thousand women at once is that which prevents all our portraits being distictly seen upon the wall. They all urc painted there by reflection from our but because all of them are paint and bcsoutrhl li.-r to him l-iil, one word or look of love ere he i was quite driven to despair. ncithc tears nor protestations moved was cold and unfeeling as matWc. "1 am an allianced said haughtily, Kro he drew to a close she litrned .f up her nose, as you may well and if I were not, think you I would be- come the wife of a poor She turned tconifnlly away, and left him alone in his grid and despair. The repentance which soon awoke in iho heart of S >phio, unhappily came too late. The biidegiomn and her father hastened 'he eight days she would be Ihe wife of Count Robert. The ceremony was to bo per- formed in the great saloon of thccit.y, and the Conut cniiccl on Stiauss to request him to lend the orchestra on that occasion, and to honor his bride with the composi- tion of a now waltz. Strauss the most misorablo man in God's universe, promised him both. "Ho wish- es lo wound me more .said tho nn- happy man to I forgive him and may she be she ncvur repent her choice.'1 lie addressed himself earnestly to his work. This waltz should be tlie intcrpve tcr of his passion and his gr'icf to Sophie. [I should challenge al least her pity, it not hcvlovo. When all tho great city jslept, Strnuss took his violin, opened his window, gazed out. into the cold night, and impro- vised and aionncd forth his sad tale of wo as lugli as she chose; and scorning hi> prose, through liis pleading she broke, and thus 'twas she spoke: Oh! groat is your fame; 0'Uandy your the city you cumo, with your heart all aflame; and" yon thought in the shade of mountain or glade, to capture a miiid by pomp and parade !0! save all your tears, your hopes, nnd your fears, your "ducks" Jin I your some other ears. All men arc agreed you're a nice bird indeed; but you're figure's too lean, you're too gaunt and too green; and that is not all, you're excessively tail; your nose is too a noso like a pig, aud vou wear a huge wig, whilo your upper lip seems just theshape'of your dreams. IS'ow my answer you tho door, you may Still "he lingered to plead in his love and las ho boasted and told of his titles and her station in life whom he chose as his wife. But he found it was no pnrt of n mountain maid's heart to bear insult or wrong from an eye or a That maid could not brook such word and such look, and caught down a broom that hung in the room, and hit him a blow that m.-idt'tbe blood flow not gracefully Ho lit on nil four just out of the door all covered with gore. Then he sprang to his considered it sweet children cinplox themselves, when not under the jiarent's eye (involving as it does the character of tho company they and the uses to which they put such funds as are at their their disposal, ate the legitimate subjccts of parental investigation. Nothing will ruin a child sooner than vicious associates. The lessons they learn appeal to their pas- sions and preset) L enjoyment. If they have had no experience at home in self-denial, if they have no esteem for virtuous, acts, there is no molive but hue to keep them from from crime, and that has been demon- stratod again and again, amounts to bill little. A colcniporary or. this subject ha.s the following well-timed remark-.- There ih no iliilicuiiy in ascerlainitiir where children spend their "time, and how they enjoy themselves, unless they arc on forged in mischief. If they keep their h.iuiitb and their il is com- monly because they are nshamrd of them. It is in respect to their out-goings that parental vigilance is chiefly demanded. What attracts them away Iron) homo, and what they do when abroad, is what the parent is the mo4 interested iu are I'. :b a jirciiy sayinj; 01" an oU writer, that men, like, books, begin uud ccd L'huik I'ti-i seiuhtv. "Mr. 1 waul lo buy .1 shiiiing'j worth ui liny." ly it lor -'Oh no, it's for tho dorssu'l ofct Husband. J h.iio tin- so In! :bit 1 can't '-Well, HIV d-ar, 1 wouldn't try; nobody wants to It it snid that pood actions thrown away. Asa we iiud very few of them. If the person complains the town :n which lie the presumption In s despised in it. Allow a boy lo run at one year in indolence, and you lime Lid tl.e riun d.atioti whereon will be buil? his future ruin. It is bcllcr to be the sheep of poor and honest than a mutton-pie at ihe feast of a. king. Peace is the opening star of the souf. aud virtue its sun; ihc two are never far apart. lar go issues on 1 banks. They mukc no solid cn-iital. pretcn-l to what we really ccrct and nivtii often to d.-sjiise whut via "Vou your t.'uipcr in ir.v .-aid an individual of doubtful reputation to a gentleman. "True, sir, and I shouldn't wonder if I I have about me." Through associations formed, and habits r. land with taxa- contracted in evening hours, for which thej sipaiion they are tempted to gamb'.e and steal. There is uo. propriety in allowing children, while acquiring an education, to be without the circumspection of parent 01 teacher. When past that period of life, they' are safe only in some regular and respectable employment. Idleness is vice. Young men should be brought up to feel that next to the infamy of crime is the di'grace of dependence. A genteel vagabond has no more sigmfieanc  might haie theirs. Tho man w never tued ihan the commonest They be-lconipniiinnMiip oi a lilliu child has como distinguished from each other main- ly when the vagrant, having e.xhaiistcd tl.c resources or the patience of friends, is thrown upon public charity for support Drinking-houscs and office-socking arc- about tho most corrupting agor.cies nf the day, in their influence upon young. ly passed by uiie of flit jrro.itesl of life, as one. pasiCH a, rave tiowor without nluiking it ot knowing its taluv. An Indiana paper diiriiif; a trial in Lawrence Cuuit. a hid who oalli-J as .1 witne s, was if he an f.alli, and where lie would so if lie told n lie. Jfe Mid he to Uio sweet stars above, that, looked kindly in I all "What d exclaimed individual to an voiitli that, had seized him by iipun the strofcl. uOb notliing, !o sock my fortune, waltz, every measure of which spoke a long ing sorrow, a wailing wo. Tho hall glis- tened and shone with bright jewels, nnd brighter eyes; but Sophie was more glori- ously beautiful than all. The richest gems lent their charms and their lustre; the pure myrtlo wreath bloomed golden hair, and the rare and costly bridal veil shaded hor beautiful features fnm the full of the adoring crowd. iStrauss, :i haggard, cmar-iafcd man, with brilliant, piercing black eyes, sharp, strongly marked features, dressed from head to fool in black, as thonuhho had assumed this mourning livery for the bride now dead to him, stood sad and silent in the gallery above, directing the movements ol' the orchestra. Sophie danced, now with one, now with another of the wedding guests; and as often as she paused after the giddy whirl of the dar.cc, she turned her eyes towards the pale, grief-stricken Strauss, in his robes of sorrow nnd mourning, and met his piercing look of despairing love. It was more than pity sho was remorse, it wivs kindling love. A terriblejf'ensts than ihc luxurious by constant pain invoke in her heart, like a swelling'toasts. the city dandified men have Inarnod to be-1 provision not earned by honest industry. I wave of ihc Green Mountain Fair. j It is a mistake lo suppose that jfrom sixteen lo twenty-two are beyond What does ele.v.c mean. 'it menus to stick !rKCth Does 'Im weed t'l-eti.er imj the onlv nose Tai ji-cntii is ihe preparation property quahfv j child." [ihe voting for submission to authority and j jlaw. These are well known truths. lull >.n "unu "li i-. i i Kuin and politics, rum and Ipractically they ;iro disregarded; and (heir nier.uingbwl amli'ing, au-i i d" I'll her! thankless and jjuilty chi'.- jtumnml are l-.nr.-i hand in.- iu n- .viiv iiol-'l of the lit-ti'lrMB' ln and shame. So-! IT i, a Uc.-hcd Ihit-g lh.it th- :-c niv i leiely.suffers from i I iu ihe multiplicalion, called crazv men in the tii-ro tiling that in "I'. i r J___ .____j ___i .-_ .1 To of lid. oat and drink is to ivith :otu.n and oil. the liiuip of poverty and crime, and in the vicious I influence of turbulent and unprincipled Trarscrfyt. we make tho. sitoiii-.ieh a -rgular retiiPtevy of fond, lln1 soon beciiine the sepul- chre of'.ho To make a God of your belly is to sell yourself to the devil. _The poor are much less injured by occasional Sccrcinry, stream, growing over wider and deeper, threatening to overwhelm aticj destroy her quite. Gladly she would have wept, but on each spot, and cacti on the same sur- Lhe (5riml tt souruicd twelve o'clock, WM. it. MOUO.VX. At JMkwn'soKUtaii-J. BRKAD CHEAPER TUAX FLOUR oj otcr At tin? Taylor's Store.! tntjl.-j. njy rwm. li.'.TH i AVIXG taken c'mrge of Uie B.ihcry in this I sm prepared ti> nf! I IO< A 1 n an.l. N OT A U V V f K J JatI ntOI-'KSblON'Al. UAKKR in il'aco, and many other objects at tho same one is seen as a picture. But darken j it chamber and let a single pencil of rays iu through a keyhole, then you have a pic- lure on the wall. We never fall in love wiili'i woman in distinction from women, until we can got an image of her through a, pm-hoie; and then we can see no'.hing i.'l-c, and nobody but ourselves can sec the image in our mental Breakfast Tuff'c. 'lo.tn.-i.. .tlornilion T ;.vy f.xoi. .K- tc. AH .ii.-.-.'Mi; -lili-n'li'l I Wan) i, p. .'-1 -lO I'M not fr-.r tin- -.-.'ouU. tJ.tll. nnd eon- vave o.n.'-l v.- In .i.i is tim.i Hour and Strauss gave tho signal for a new waltz. The gay dancers stood up, Sophie on the arm of the happy bridegroom. All stood spell-bound with the wondrous witchery of those magic sounds. They forgot to dance, they gnzcd wonderingly up at the pale man in black, whose grief-torn soul breathed out its wo through the! souiuliug strings his instrument. Hi.-, bow moved, with his heart went his spirit, bridegroom led dance and are those mad with the idea of to beai back the many wrongs which op- press degrade poor In some pni-ts of liic country, editors Where shall I go to trade? People ask nre always supporting other themselves this quest inn almost as often as j and uksciting r.o rights lo olive themselvcK they have a want to supply. And what j They remind us of the walking must be the answer? Common fcacs sajrsldcsciibcd by to iho man who aceupies a con- J upon all-fours and offering their backs to spicucns place in the advertising columns i accept Ihc a.< of the newspaper.'' If a man docs not! j think his worth advertising, people wwsed i out null th..-.r Jl is proud prerogative of noble na-j tures thnt they retain their influence afler death. The lamps whiuh guided us on earth, become stars to light from above, and the beneficent may still olaim our aspirations the species of apotheosis equally honorable to the living and tho dead. danco. ?rra-i: Mirth is like r. flash of lighltiinp, that iv ilia "_t m m apt to lake his business at his own   was tion. word of it. j.jiaa who said: He tlmt acts toward? iuen, us if God MW him. ncd prays to God He levels ac easy credulous ear to as if men heurd him, although be raaj M. IIo who ICVCB jesting nr.d raii'c'y brio v--! with Jarful eyes j'uto ronny iroublcs. land dnncr, nnd ows the fiyin-- pair up a kind of .'h-yiin-bt in tbe mind, aiid icalumny, is cither a man of very ill obtain all he asks, or Encceed in h-> win They'danoe, it with ,-v Moa'-lyT anj porpe-ua! bar- no more and uB-lnrttandingFunderlJikcs, wil! fj wil! never ceaso jtv. jtban a child do so.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication