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Waukesha Freeman Newspaper Archive: October 4, 1888 - Page 1

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   Waukesha Freeman, The (Newspaper) - October 4, 1888, Waukesha, Wisconsin                               BEST-.IOCAL PSPER. The onh paper wholly printed in Wiiukeshn Countv. WAUKESHA FREEMAN. LABGESTpMHQH The Best Advertising JTcd- luni In tlio couiuv. (Entered at thu Post Office nt WaukMha, Win., as Second Class Mutter.) Volume XXX, No, 40. Waukesha, Wisconsin, October Whole Number, 1557 TT1LL THE P. M. GO? HIS BRETHREN TRYING TO OUST CARNEY. A Strong and Determined Opposition to Carr.ey's Long ported Petition to'Washington. everyone was well satisfied with the first Republican demonstration in our village. A similar meeting will take place soon at _____ Sussex, and it is also intended to have at least one more in thin village before Postmaster Carney may have to election, J. A. WHITE, vacatp his odiee. Even before the 4th of f Secretary H. and M. Club. next. And the reason for this Capt. E. Enos of 'Wa.ukesha also deliv- ered a short and witty speech, which was characteristic of that popular represen- tative of the "Saratoga of the West." After a short speech by President Samuel Jr., the meeting was closed, and the two clubs formed in line and marched to the armory of tho Pewaukee Club, where they disbanded. The evening wruj very pleasant, and extraordinary possibility lies not in the shameful inefficiency with which the service has been conducted, but in the fraternal solicitude of some of his brother Democrats, who feel that the load of office and honor which he his for some time borne are too much for him, and demand that he be immedi- ately and permanently out a pension however as fur as has learned. FROM AN OLD ROMANCE. A Long Ago Romantic Marriage at Muk- wonago Ends in a Law Suit. The Mil wau kee Journal of Sept. 28th prints a dispatch from Chicago stating TEE PULL PEGGED OF THE BAPTIST .CONVENTION NEXT WEEK. Papers and Addresses by Emi- nent Clergymen. Meeting of the Woman's Mis- sionary So- cIe ty. Notes. The secretary of the reception com- mittee for the Baptist Convocation has received notice from between one hundred and fifty and two hundred delegates who expect to be present. This number will probably be con- siderably increased by the end of the DEATHS DURING THE WEEK. Three Pioneers of the County Pass Obituary Notices. Mr. Samuel Baird, whose death oc- curred' on Friday, September 2Sth, was one'of the early settlers of this was of that Scotch-Irish stock wh'ose characteristics are so dis- tinct, and who have given many hon- It has long been an open secret that the property left at Hager's death. It in the membership of the Democratic i is also intimated that Prof. Hager in- camp which in located on this portion centionallvadministeredthemoi'nhinR that suit has been brought against the week th h it is th ht Mrs. A. D. Hager, formerly Rose Blood'- of Mukwonago, by a former wife of Prof. Hager, who alleges that her di- vorce was procured by fraud, and that therefore she is legally entitled to all the banks of the LittleFox, discord occupied a prominent place. Mr. Car- ney used to have things all his own T.-tty. He got used to to dic- tating and demanding, and if any oth- er Democrat, had anything to say it was said in open defiance of the com- manding spirit. Of course there hap- pened to be such Democrats now and then, and the result of their bravery an opposition party, not so very strong indeed, and not at all united except upon I he one tenet of opposi- tion to the boss, but this single plank ;entionally administered the morphine that caused his death, on account of financial difficulties. Residents in the southwestern part of the county still remember the sur- prise with which it became known, six- teen or seventoen years ago, that pret- ty youthful Rose Blood, the village school-teacher at Mukwonago, was going to loarry her mother's man of wide reputation as a geologist and occupying a good position, but thrice her ago and with a living wife and three children in Vermont. The marriage was consummated wide enough for them all i however, and the couple went to live on whon in buttle array, and they have succeeded not only hi worrying Carney a good deal, but sometimes in Absolutely triumphing over him. Mr. ,T. J. HndiielcL after the more -weighty matters of making his fortune and belonging to the Republican party had been disposed of, naturally slipped into the plaeo of leader of this opposition party, and still occupies that proud position. He is the man and keeps in fighting trim thu opposition, and from the op- position conic the threats against in Chicago, where the Professor was hardly reach the five hundred which were at first expected. Every Baptist Church in the state that contributes to the state fund for Home Missions, is entitled do a delegate, besides the clergyman, at this convention, and for every extra contributed, another delegate may bo sent. The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, of Wisconsin, will hold its an- nual convention ou Tuesday, October Oth, at the Congregational Church. This is a Baptist organization, but holds its meetings at the Congrega" tional Church for reasons of conve- nience. Special preparation will be made to provide appropriate music during the convention. It has been stated that besides be- ing the serai-centennial of the First this country from Ireland ip 1839, with his sister and their pa- rents, he began with only his willing hands and his honest and resolute purpose, and secured for himself a home and competence, and for his children a fair start in life. It was his honorable pride that he had done this by faithful work, and that all he had gained represented good service ren- AN OLD MAN'S PATE. THE TROUBLE AT MUKWONAGO. Peter Callashan Burned In his Cot- His with Wife Rescued Difficulty. Temperance Lecture [Written Death in Letters of Fire. Peter Callagban was an Irish labor- er between 60 and 70 years old when he concluded, about six years ago, to invest one or two hundred dollars in a little house for himself and his old wife. He asked permis- sion of Mr. Haight to build a cottage on the latter's land near the St. Paul railroad on the Mukwonago road. The request being granted, the house vras soon completed and theoldcouple moved in, but the wife died a week or two later. Falsa Reports That Have'Been Cir- culated. dered. His Christian experience com- From that time on, Peterpaiw more Baptist Convention in the state, the same date is also the fiftieth, anniver- sary of the organization of the church manager of the Histoncal_ Society, j herej nut this is not quite HIS CHAIN ALL BURNED. the postmiiKti'r. It is reported that a petition has been forwarded to Wash- instoiulcniniulimtliis removal. How the matter will all end is an WMle Lose; One son was born to them who at the time of his father's death last July was fourteen years of age, and with his mother became the sole heir of the Professor's property. The death of Prof. Haser was caused by an over- menced soon after his coming to this country, and continued to the end, making his last days calm and hope- ful. He married in 184o Miss Mary A. Carpenter, and made his home three miles south of this village, re- ceiving for part of his farm a patent from the United States. There they ived until her death in 1S74, and there one ot his sons lives after him. Four children survive, three living in this vicinity and one in Nebraska. A very large company attended the fu- neral, which was held on Sunday at the residence of his son, Stephen A. Baird, where he died. And so, at the age of 70 years, has passed from us a good citizen, a true friend of virtue and religion, an enemy of vice and in Chris- tian peace a life of Christian purpose. and more lonesome, until vS'resol ved to marry again, and in IS S3 wedded with the widow Gleason. The new Mrs. Callaghan was subject to oc- casional visitations of appetite for alcoholic liquor, and Mr. CallaghK.ii, who had been a total abstainer for some years before, we believe, was in- duced to join his wife in her excesses, but after one or two such occasions became disgusted and insisted upon selling his cottage to Mr. Haiqht, so tnat he might leave, as he said, and go to Milwaukee to live with one of dose of morphine, supposed to have been taken to relieve sick headache. Mrs. Hager indignantly denies the assertion of the former Vermont wife, and claims Wiat the divorce was per- fectly regular and legal. church was not organized until some months later. The full programme for the conven- tion is as MOXUAV. OCTOUEH 8. p. M. Mc-clinj; al Hie Board of II VSCO.VW.V BAPTIST MINISTERIAL CuWO.V. open question. Mr.Canieyhasalarge portion of thu local democracy at his beck and call, but the- members of the His Barn and Contents by Fire. Last Wednesday afternoon, minority are livelier and mndo of bet- i the threshers on the farmofAlberi 'tor lighting material. It will of Alden. Delafield, were waiting for a course i-ome down to a relay of coal to continue work wi question of the larger body, comparatively inactive, or the smaller body moving briskly, can accomplish more for the Demo- cratic party. THEY TAKE THE LEAD Pewaukee Republicans Rally. Hold a Lively The following should been pub- lished lust week, but on account of the laxity of the mail sei-vice was re- ceived too la-te. As news it is not the freshest, but as an expression of Pe- WiUikee loyalty think it will be read with interest by our Republican read- -ers: ED. Harrison and Morton Club of this vilhigu had a grand rally on tho ovouiuj; of s'ept. 25th, the ilou. G. W Uazloton of Milwaukee being the orator of Clio evening. The Republi- can Clubot SHSSVX ttuikpnrt in the torch- light pursuit', and tho tine appearance aamira-ble drill of this splendid body their engine, a spark from the unex tinguished fire in the engine fell upon a wheat-stack and set it on lire. Brave effort was made to extinguish the .'lames, but a strong wind "was blow- ing, .and in spite of all the fire was communicated to the barn, and the whole burned to thegrouud. The loss is heavy, probably not less than 500, while the insurance is only New Appointments of Methodist Clergymen. The M. E. Conference closed Monday evening. The following appointments were made in Waukesha county: Menomonee Lucg. North Prairie and C, Maxon. Sewell. i Pewaukee and Par- sons. Sussex and P. Havlett. .M. Annual .Sonuon, Rev, J. JI. Coon. Cul- k-clion fur Mimslor.s' Aid Sock'ty. Appoint- moiit Committee.' TBF.SDAY, OOTOUBU 'J. -MOKNING. Ek-L-tioii of Utiixirt of Ilihtoricnl Committee. ftlloircJ by confonjiicii nnd prayer. I'.islorn! Visitation." Hev. .E. 0. Tnvlor. 1-cci.ure. 0. Sub Hie Tlioole-Ry. AKTEKXOON. Rovh-uK Hou- to promote tlieni in 01 Cluircboji. Di.-cu.ision opocotl by licv, B. i I'HSicott .ind Her. S. E. Price, followed by Ih uiiiiutc voluntary iiddrcsses. Lecture, G. W. Xorthrup. Subjec Tlio Atonement. Business. Adjournment, KVKNJ.XG. W1SCOSS1X BAPTIST STATE fpmfil Jubticc Scri-icM. Address of Welcome. Rev. A- Brood hurst i Ite-spunM! by I liu President of t he Coi vviitlon, Jubilee Address, by IIoii. J. E. Doolittle. The and who wroupht during the living ;md deud, Rev D. 15. H.-ilteittiui WKIXVESDAY, OCTOBER 10 MOItMNG Prayei nnd Praise Led by Rev. A. Miner her home, in this vil- lage, on Saturday morning last, Mrs. Lydia Holbi'Ook, in the 74th year of her age. Deceased was the wife of Dr. W. D. Holbrook, to whom she was married bis grown-up children. After months of such solicitation Mr. Haight bought the building in the summer of 1SS4, but after getting his money for it, Peter concluded to remain there with his wife and to pay rent for the house and its adjoining little garden patch. From time to time since, Mr, and ilrs. Callaghan had seasons of rather hard drinking, but never did any- thing apparently serious or dangerous, even to the extent of breaking or otherwise injuring any property ot 1S40, and resided with her husband j their own or of others. On Monday Five Dollars Covers the Cost. ol men tlio chief attraction of life outdoor part of theeveuisig's programme. They were commanded bv Capt. Daiiijh- Barker's Cornet Band sxipplied the music, which was tiuelv rendered. The .rewnukee Club mailc its first ap- pciiriinw in line on this evening, and, considering the short time they have been organized and their limited" oppor- tunities lor drilling, made a remarkably fine appearance. This was owing to tlfe skill of Capt. Brooks and LieutsI Wood and Palmer. Only part of the Club could apptMU- in line, as there were only 40 uniforms on hand, wbile the member- ship is nearly double that number. The e i As there seoms to be some misui v I demanding about ic, the members o the Ladies' Art Class wish to stat that the membership fee of Five Do] lars covers all expenses. The cost o the omnibuses is paid out of the general fund, and there will be no as sessments. The first meeting of the class will be held on Wednesday, Oc- tober 24th. column was headed by a regimental stand of colors and a handsome bonnerluving a portrait ot Harrison and Morton. There were also several transparencies carried in their ranks, showing the mot- Republlcan Village Caucus. A caucus of the Republican electors of the Village of Waukesha will boheld at the Town Hall, ou Friday evening, October 5th, 1SSS, at o'clock, to select delegates to the County Conven- tion to be'held October Gch, and to transact such other business as may cst "American OitizensMust Rule and several others. The.chibs formed in line on Street. jn front of Mrf. Holies' residence, and nuv.-chetl through the principal streets ol the village, halting at the hall, where n, large crowd was already gathered. Many prominent men of both political parties were in the audience. Mr. Hazleton began his address shortly alter S o'clock, and made the finest ar- sumont- in favor ot the protective tariff that was ever heard iu the village. He frequently stopped by the enthusi- astic clwcrisig and apphiuse of his intcr- oKted audwuee. the meeting. H. M. Chairman. Village Committee. 3ZS Destructive Fire at Lisbon. Fires in the county are becoming much too common. The last notice of destruction comes from Lisbon where on Saturday last Tomas Brown had his barns and all this seasons yield of grain burned. The 6re is said to have been started by Mr. Brown's little son, who emptied a pan of ashes upon a straw-stack: growth iron otio to fourteen, Rov. J. W. Fish A Half Century of Sunday School Work ill WiscoiisJn. Kov.'w. W. I'ntfengill Ednciilionul Advancement in Fifty Years Rev. U. A. Hobbs Tlio mul Growth of German Bap- tists in Rev. H. L. AFTERNOON :00 The Bepinnliig.-ind Growth of Scandinavian Baptists in and Kev. N. Jensen; Swede Bnptij K. A. Ostorjjren Christian Benevolence and in Fifty Years, Rev. if. G. Hodge Woman's work and the Jubilee, Mrs. S. K Curtis Reniiniscencws from Vjoneers and others. Le 1 bv Kev. Janius Dolnny Adjournment EY7.xi.vn FiftyTcjT5ofBnptistHistoric.il Gleanings, Her. J. n. Heir S'SO The Divinely ordained elements of Mission- ary Power and Growth, Rev. W. P. Helling TBCIMDAY, OCTOBEItll The General Work. JIOKNINO Prftye" and of Committee on Nominations and Election o OlHcers IJcpon-oftheBo.ini I'renentud by KCT. D. E. HaltcniaH I Report of Treasurer Presented bv Georc. W. and Evangelistic Churcl Work Itcv W B Bulliss Annual Sermon Rev D B'Cheney, Jr Announcement of Committees Adjourn ment AtTERMOON ore in Tteport of State Vice-president, Mrs L Smith Addreuscs: Our Stato Work. Mrs K A Oster prcn Work of Woman's B H M Society MraEAHovey The Training School, Misi LotUo Uerrinr Report of Committee on Homo Missions Presented by Kev 1 B Culdwell Address on Western ilissiOns, Kev Spencer 4.no Report of Committee on Bible and Publica- tion socioty Presented by Rev D B Cheney, Jr in Waukesha since 1851. Prior to her death she had been ill for a long time, but bore up uncomplainingly to the end. Mrs. Holbrook was pos- sessed of a kindly heart, and was be- loved by a widecircleof neignbors and friende, who have in years past been the recipients of many kindnesses at her hands. She leaves her husband, the companion of nearly fifty years, to mourn her death. Services wure atternoon last, he was seen to go along Main Street towards his home about 0 o'clock, .evidently somewhat under the influence of liquor. At a quarter to seven the inside of his little cottage was a sea of flames, and Mr. Wrti. Uohuson, the painter, who hap- pen ;d to be passing at that time, was bursting in the door, (which had been locked on the with a view of rescuing the inmates. Mr. Johnson was met by a flood of flames and held at the residence on South Street, I smoke, but dropped to his hands and i____ _ ___j____ j 'i_i_ i f Monday forenoon, and the remains were conveyed to Illinois for inter- ment. Address. Rev C C Bittinr Specsal Business and Adjournment EVKyrNG Report of Committeo on Educntion by Rev Robert Leslie Pre- Addrexs, G JF Un field Address. Eev F T Gutes FJHDAV, OCTOBi-B 12 PrHyer and Praise Service Address .Prayer in relation to Missions, one of our prcstest needs. Rev E O Smith Report of Committee on. -Foreign Missions Presented Rev F A Marsh Address, Rev C H Tolman Report of Committee on Resolutions sented by Rev P Hellings Report of Committee on Obituaries VscntedbfRev A A Drown h45 Unfinished Butinesy Final Meeting of the Board of Managers AH the railroads in Wisconsin will ell round-trip tickets to Waukesha rom all points in the state nt one arid ne-thirrt fare. Pre- Pre- home near AVauke" sha, Sept. '27, Anna Blackweli; aged 77 veal's. Mrs. Blackweli, the widow of Deacon Alvin Blackweli of Waukesha? died on Thursday, Sept. 27th, aged 77 years. Her maiden name was Anna Wagner. She was born in Chenango county, N. Y., one of ten children, three of whom survive her. She had been married seven or eight ,'ears when, in 18-15, the family re- noved to Wisconsin and settled on -he farm two miles west of this village, vhore the rest of their days were to ie spent. Mr. Blackweli was an hon- ired officer in the Baptist Church here, j.nd Mrs. Blackweli has for many been a faithful and beloved mem- 'er. Since his death, six years ago, he has lived with her son, George] 31ackwell, patiently waitingand look- ngfor the final summons. Her sick- ess was brief. She anticipated the atal result sooner than others, was content in the anticipation, and gave directions in regard to her funeral, which, in the absence of her pastor, Rev. Mr. Broadhurst, was conducted by Rev. Mr. Camp on Monday, Octo- ber 1st. A Jarge company gathered to do honor to her memory and to at- tend her body to the final resting place. knees and groped within till he felt Mrs. Callaghan's prostrate and sense- less form which he dragged out and handed over to Henry Haight, thefour- teen year old son of Mr. Haight, to be taken farther away while he himself made another attempt to enter the building for Mr.Callughan. This time h'e could not enter, and in a minute more the triumphant ilaraes were above the roof, and other people arrived on the scene. The alarm was telephoned down town from Mr. I Haight's. and the fire department answered thecall with prompt alarcity, arriving there with the hose cart be- fore it would have seemed possible. The progress of the fire w'as checked at once, and before S o'clock there was hardly a spark to be seen. In the meantime the body of the old man was seen on the floor of his living room, the legs sprawled apart, and she_arms bent by his sides an though trying to lift himself t'ronr, his position prone to the floor. His clothes were entirely consumed and his back burn- ed to cinder from the skull to the heels. The back of the skull was so charred as to hav_e fallen apart, leaving the cooked brain utterly bare. The remains were taken away as ten- derly us possible, and Justice Green called a coroner's jury together to view them. A coffin box was then Undoubtedly there were lively times at Mukwonago a week ago Monday night, on the occasion of a church meeting of the Congregational Society, but reports have been published that pervert the true facts. And that of a Waukesha paper, which said, vari- rious prominent people, among them an ex-assemblyman, etc., took was especially perverted. The truth of the matter is that two of the Trus- tees of the Mukwonago A. E. Perkins and Dr. agreed Saturday night as to allowing the Republicans to hold a meeting in the Church, and it was held under the wide-awake protest of the minister, Rev. Mr. Brown, (a who refused to deliver up the key, and the door was foroed open in the presence of the Trustees, it is said. So much ticuble was occasioned, however, that ameetinc of the Society was called to settle the" difficulty. At this meeting the two Trustees, Mr. Perkins and Dr. Alexander, (the latter receding from his position of Saturday became involved in a dispute, and finally, if reports are true, tho Doctor struck Mr. Perkins in the face, whereupon the latter did what most people would have done, proceeded to pummel his enemy. At this juncture Charles Clark, a prohibitionist, who was opposed to the use of the church by Republicans, took hold of Mr. Per- kins, when che latter's son came to the rescue of his father, and gave Mr. Clark a severe whipping. About this tirnu some very effective language was used by both men and women, and all agree that it was not such an affair as would grace an v sort of a church. It may be safely conclu- ded that the trouble was between pro- hibitionists and their democrat icallits, with Dr. Alexander on the one side and Messrs. Perkins and son on the other. Prohibitionists had held meet- ings there without awordofobjeccion, and Mr. Perkins was fully warranted in thinking that Republicans has as good a right. The Freeman does not care to up- hold the idea of quarreling over such matters, but from all the reports that have come in it is safe to say that Mr. Perkins could not have gotten up such an everlasting row unless there had been a good deal of bad blood among the bevy of Democrats and Prohibi- tionists who opposed him. Caucus Notice Pursuant to the call for a Republi- can county convention to b.e'-held at Waukesh.-., Oct. Cth, 1888. a caucus of the Republican electors of the town of Waukesha is called to meet at the Town Hall, in Waukesha, on Friday, October 5th, 1888. at o'clock P. M., to transact such business as may appear necessary under the notifica- tion aforesaid. By order of THE TOWN COMMITTEE. Enjoying Great Opportunities. Last Saturdu.y was the best day in the history of the Milwaukee Exposition, over people taking ot the extraordinary low rates secured by the Exposition for visitors to the State Metropolis. THE GARDEN OF AMERICA. How a Waukesha Co. Man Flourishes in Southwestern Minnesota. C. N. W. E. E. Co. LAJTD MARSHALL, Minn., .Sept. 2S. j E. E. Lubar, Win.: I have just had a talk with Peter Pur- vis of Venion, Waukenha county. Ht bought a Farm here two yeareaso on sec. 11, town 110, 40. He tells me his wheat averaged 2.'1 bushels to the acre, 3e Ibs. to the bitthel. He has about bushels, which lie sell here now at about 05 cents per bushel. He will hold it however, and get per Me has 40 acres of corn that _ cannot be beaten an vw-here, and his oats sent for, from Bannon and the body I and vegetables are all fair. His farm The death of Richard Griffing of waukee occurred at midnight on Thurs- day, September 27th, after an illness that had its origin in the hardships and exposures of the war. The funer- al occurred on Sunday under the aus- pices of the Grand Army Posts of Wa-ukesha, assisted by the Post of Sussex andPewaukee. Sixty veterans escorted the remains of their departed comrade to their, last resting place. Mr. Griffing was well known and greatly beloved in the. community where he had so long made his home! Ie was a brave soldier, a worthy citi- en, a faithful friend: An aged moth- er, a wife and two children, and many rierids mourn his death.' He was'only :5 years ot age. J sent to his undertaking rooms.. Mrs Callaghan, lying all the time by the roadside, and powerless as a wee cloth, was taken down to the county jail for the night. At the inquest the next day her testi- mony was taken. She denied having drank a drop during Monday, and said Peter came home about dark, drunk, and bringing more whisky. After some talk between her and him she suddenly discovered that there was fire in the room, and was trying t-o take her trunk oat when she was dragged away by two men. She did not remember noticing what Peter did after the fire started- There are cer- tainly inaccuracies in this statement, but the strong probability is that Callaghan struck a match for some purpose and threw it upon something inflammable enough to take fire, and that in trying to. extinguish the flames, both parties fell to the floor and were unable to get up. Mrs. Callaghan was probably quite as intoxicat husband, to say the least; as her Being rather nearer the door she was rescued instead of him. -It is expected chat, she will be sent to the county house: The calamity is the most appalling example of- the effects of intemperate drinking' that Waukesha has ever afforded.' will Howjstbat for a farm that cost all told? The farm paid him in proportion, last year, and will cio as well rightaJong. Threshers tell me they hjivenottbreshed less than 1C bushels to the acre, while the average haw been 30 bushels to the acre. The corn also cannot be excelled in Illinois or Iowa. They have had no Iroet here yet, and everything is ripe. Investors Are last coming in, although there are thousands of acrea of the very finest soil open near thriving towns and railway centres! at from to an acre. It will pay all who want these lands on Ions time and low interest to comeout thisfall. There are only two more excurnions at half October 9th and 23d. Thin a golden opportunity lor farmers and capital A. A. SHEPHERD. Geij. Act... fr. Railway Co. For all information concernlnc these cheap lands apply to Richard E. Labar, Land Agent for C. N. W; Railway Co., Exchange Bank Building, 71 RC AD IAN, H "Trip IliD For a, boolc upon ha and the ARCADIAN Srjtl.xo, send postal card to.THE AKCAPUS MlIflliAJ, SPUING Co.. UU. Wia. ..v.   

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