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Waukesha Democrat: Tuesday, March 26, 1850 - Page 1

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   Waukesha Democrat (Newspaper) - March 26, 1850, Waukesha, Wisconsin                               WAUKESHA, ,1 I VI HV MORNING, IJY f '-H" ion. in advance, 00; months, >2 00, be "n i MI "i'l's I' ;li the list al rates. ol CTnt flcrainc. I 1'ieels on Tllesd ly nun..-it I I. l) O. I' ,Lt, x< Tn "day in  conduct him to the pl.iee ol exe- cution in Thomas, St. Uis fortitude, as Cur- trim ii-, ci-- r Ury.int was inspired by the eution in 1 homas. St. His fortitude, as Cnr- i'l uilum.i nr the s iblimity i run -afterwards remarked, uiioottintalious.__ nl 1, bil' nt sky. Hi: loll :t, us I H'J fell thai he was ilying in u nnV.o Ciiusc, let iv-i) h -iirl lias been ralletl to fool, iissomo au i hu K new I hat his blood would cement hib n.-vi r ami. Y a we tlieic nr" 'iiiniy ol country's At a short distance leaders, u-ii i, u-, dt tin; p.-ruMil ol .fro.n the carriage iit he was impris- t'lo-i niKjio hue-., wi.i feel a holv n-irl Oucd: n in.i.n-niiiir fnn.di fnl'mvml i ,i fj', evening 6 G :d. .1 U Nirgi on, ''7 i -.ili la o oi i'ivor st .1. 'I I d iiukcfil.J1.. at li'.s ic'.siderieo. ie-i -inipie line-., wi.i feel ii holy irid d.-ep oued; nil-i ti iii s1 irred m if is the de irost w.u-d in hie. Onlv he h oued; ii in.Kii-uiui: coaeh followed, which had one oc  tho cnnfUhnco uf 1'iieiid. i- one i.ioiive jon pun trust; fur ho ha--il.-uds iit tin1, purest t-arthly lui( s and with children, and h.i' dy men s >bljed for 'you'iu Air. Robert.' ftl.iny within a few yenrs. shed, but neM-r -A -in r.t. d to 'uu Ail ,1 "O h huthor. at tho s u ,t i 11 3. f il !1 I l I .11 V. i i or evil pii1 po-jc-s; nor an ,'u are vi'natinc in tho I ch iiiiVT'i of tho line my i child." Ii t his hands to sin which would n' I ace, o I'll-.- I win: i t h r le-art to know. lhe ro- 'I' r re of ii inoMior'.s love is t'.ie invest x this, yoiinj; man, the world ;i i'- lil hi'S no! th..1 rerollec 'oil of li.u! icii-h Much s icrod one so n ..'11 b jlovod, soduoplv rom-et-- ted. He vv is indeed the child of Ireland's Tic 1 .boi hardened uiechauic- shoo v !i'..e ;i in'i vou-- woman. Tho SliiiK'.U on the martyr's piile and d liis id'-ril. The old man 1.! d vulhthe world lor wept like some enthusiast boy. The croud svviijod to and fro, as if their piissiop.s moved them. Ho tinned to them; p-ojile, liis I'riend.s, his brutliei to tlu m for whom If his life drops, to s ay whose misery, like Ion he went joyfully to tho scaf- fold; he turned and spoke in the full sonorous middy tone u l.ieh was heard so often in his college s nnd delight. j I d'u in iiiul svith S-'iiliments o1 universal lov and kindness to" ards all O'i liiid, nnd niiisi he tlio. hat! have ye no KEPORf. A vessel ihnt left Jlavaiiit on the 2'2d of Februaiy, the very iiinusitig intelli- ijeiict, that i w.-is currenl uf that pkce rlnu Presidi nt was iibout to abdicate in favor of (lonoi-iil OASS, who was to take possoh-jiou o tlie Wit te House as liis sue- in thi We tt it not ut al'l unlikely that such" n repoit iiiiiili! circulate ut, Itivina. nr.d be bo- lieM'd ;o ii ci n.sidi'rablc cxtunr, so ijiiriint are t! e cjunnoii people in nil coitutr'os, .11 1 in uomo not Sprtiish, of our po- j litic.il i.ntidi and of lin- maiKier in which, thf! Pps.det sol'the Republic ar made. Tiieie u report i.fl >at too, that another expi w is boinj; fjuba, andtl.-.t lhi- time., not R ii.nd 1-1..nd, but Id be the pont ior emb ir'nation, woul! -as-iembb nt that uii'posf (.'urr) lhe expedi- to thii.r Oi (ho Ihis. nothing o'lly that (Jliaftres is ,'ctetl for a military Ii'it has oi'on sel'-ciod, il innsi )ie for s 'emit fro n interruption, :ib the New f 11 .liiiidiau an honties roidd not the ex- podition ii y would, nnd uobod} oKo would hu'. e n i ij.lit 1 i stop it, wo suppose. GLbe. :ind that sit .mers place fur th tioniiry force triirL or wt h we i nth to a pl.u o lo be si In w len the seat of Oovornmerit was lield in Nuw York, cer ain discontented HINTS FOR THE SEASON. This vegetable, should be sowed as early m the spring as the state ol the weather and condition nf the soil will admit. I hiivo even Unosvn them do veil when sown btlorc the fiosl was l.iiily out of the oven when experienced iu excess, being but .slightly lo their during the of th( ir developement, if, in deed it lliem iii.iavo-.iibly at all. A portion of every kitelien fjiirdt-ii should be appropriated to this nutritious and health- ful vegetable, especially as it is oue of the two vari 'I les of sccJb, which poptr.ar ciistoin pel-- mils us to use in a green sti.te .s an arricle of food. I am not ut pri'iint of tho jlcld cultivation of !'ui-> thut depart inout of aurestie labor beinj; reserved to be trtiiled in a mo'e extended essay, and ut a uioro time. On this subject, a late writer olisoi ve.s "l'i the iisuiil inaimor oftiie culture of pciis, they nre mviuia'oly in didls the  tn iiiiinh.iiiJ, in, II'AV blest; I.H' tliv pr.ii-.ei when right, unJ iky VDHiJ, hen UP.- v. itli st-Jiir. I oT ll e counsels unliceileil or epnrtied. been told that i-  youuij r'nuf is murdi red] O'.i God! not r, i ansvs orinu voice, not a manly blow, not- a mountu n clve'M-. "A.cyon "Xot the word it. choked; iliu Ssead is sev- ered fio-ii the 6xly: tin; uptunic'l faces are by a of horror, a'ld the, of Thomas !Sr. are laiiping hi.s blood." A- i.uiti, 1 An. I iniv Tlioti il-.isl In. IT i.v nil t-li 1 ii. r liad sic'n .dl hdple--. I lay. O mo and bjothc nv: bj i.iglit and i liodi a ii. U [-1ST. i" 'i-'ni'ii. il ihe C HI! i III U-U-.- J; lo done .ed manis-r, nod ''i ol e V the Unit d Stilti iii< p' ifes 1 --oivioo< '11 i'l "sli.i, l-on  1 llfu'j [LV-bwij Ainu u'o ie soric kind o-ios tl Pr.> bo, There bisic to tuve mo, to lovu mu like ibco. mivl or lU'iir nu'ihtr, cola bcnirU'il dic-y (.ijcm nit oli! 1 inn not M hat I soi-in; v and ad cb.ingot- I lunr, in ni> tin' fL-olin.f is thcie lonlv, ini'inorv reralU Tny at ibe tear hsl'.s. llil-ll IlOHEliT JO M. MET. Jose pi i is deiivrringa cor.rse '1 the Zfaril Course in livery Have the coinage to do without that h 3'ou do not neeJ, much }oui eyes may cov- et if. Have the to spcnk your mi. d, when it i> uocos-siiry that vou .should do so, i.n.l to hold your tonyio, when it is prudent 3 on bhould do so. FL've lhe co iniije lo speak to a frio.ud in a coat, oen though }ou arc in ny with n r'cli o'ue. ifiive the cmiiii'ie to own you nre poor ;iud tlus.s disui'm po'veity of its sharpest sliuc. Have couraceto '-cut.' the most ngrecaUlc iirqu. i.itancos you have, when you are con- vinced tliiit heluks A friend should ii frimd's infirmities, but not with n I friend's v.ees. j If ivc the currnze lo wear your old clothes, I until jou can aiiiird lo pay for ones. II t've lhe foi.iatre obey our Maker ;it llic risk lidiculed by man. And, finally, have the courage io lake a guoJ paper and pay for ii in a Ivancc. itcy is, according to Mr. Mil ton, ho has ately published a treatise on boos iu n. universal specific; and amorifj its uil e valuable properties, be de- claies that .1 pi jvents corisumption, and states that thatdcs'ro -er of human life is not known whore honey i roiridarlj' as nn article of food. 'I hotJ wbo liavB less faith in the specific, nriy p srhaps attribute the cause to tlilfen-iirc ol ell nate rather Iban to The Italian it is said, are greatly in- debted to hofipj bu> their prncticc is toshnrp- en it a fex drops of acid, though they soiticti ncs ;a' c it in pure state. Thf Stick! ff V political editor spf'tikiugc'i lhi eiiacit) wit'.i which an ailver- s.u to h s s 13 s that he rt- m sin ii dies mdiilK." in inaiiaoinjT mv p-irdeu pea0, 1 pursue a somewlrat different polu j from the After pri'p.iriii" the toil, if the sett! is unv of the more diminutive or duui k nds, 1 diuu my dulls four feet apart, and having sprink- led a small quantity of cumpost, welt fuied, in tin: boliotr, I coni'iienio This is performed sti oiiir stake at the soil t'i'it it will resist, olfeetnally the weight of i the full ynnvn vinos, or siny other weight that I may be to bear upon it. Tiii'i R feet from in the hue of the dull, I place another, and to on to the end. Around the fir.-t inches li'ini tho jjiuiinil, tie ii strong and JKISS'IIIS it arouud the next slake, co on to the third proceeding to the end of the drill. The cord is then inches, nnd firmly secured .mound tho hmt  'id not discover how ve were payim; him off ii his own coin, until we asked him what i1- was ii? was writ- ing tohi-ii sihotit.- woman' ''Why look here, srys he "you surely are i.ot ina my privnte. ItttoraV "Certainly  unty. It. that time tli3 wifi of Mi. E'lOnezer Si'eley aot it IrK 1 Iluvv IHM tj, Lo n; i vi intii j nevt 1 a y A nr, Dnliu found took from thenec -120 talents of gold; but in a divorce rom lur husba.iO, and subsequent- M'I" "V i! arol.ls Oh, onicles H, chapter vdi, verse 18, it is ly marned a l.u yer mimed Crosby TIP to a letter well i .st.-tum. nt oi to ot- to ven ember linn as vdi, verse 18, it is j ly married a lav yer named Crosby. first husband suc  si-ttin" nosifiiiu HA. niv. JrlmkpnhPttrteil nnd day cxpens- of building and the lem- 1 ...i... ,.r ,n winch tills Hold was KU'e sfttis- i-.., i i.'iiens i f od and mai- ?ln''s' ornamental painting, -S. IS.'iO. sa dreams, her air built castles, swept uwiiy hke ..osannu.r threads, her sunny visions of happy home endless ot young fac -s, radiant iu d beautiful as his. .shot out Irom her clouded s-oal her heart widowed o. its love, and dark night soltening on the mor- i- i "f hcr life' A'ld Civater nc. r me isn me, i _ j 31U- father, soured and shadowed by has turned away his luce from Tier; e. ______ ---.-._ soul to the quick, scars her with his words as of W  n, for which brought from Or'hir, was 3G5ster- _ more than the nation tl d< bt ov Greut BrTtuin. If Ophir was n three year's voyage from the Red S-n, then it xvas not in Africa Ctivc a vcrd ct of ;1. 100 damages in fai'or of the plaintiff I'o -g JuttrnaL o) niiitu i ous' fil wlue'i niny now be regarded as perfectly ucohn.atod iiud connnnn, if not iu to the sod. The land for bcaus (I nn speaking of the garden should be strong, deep rich, for whatever sonn may be pleased to say of their rapacity of g -owing on pour or cx'iatislfff sm'k, the very is the case beaix, other production, requiring :i not excessively rich soil, and an earlv and favorable Mai t, to perfect th< ir growth. the pea, they are Jestioved by fiost aud cannot, theiefore, be planted so early in the spring. THK SPRAWBRBUV. For tlie strawberry, the soil should be warm an 1 light-, ng an obvious pi odominanc-! of sand. -The sets should be planted about ten inches apart, oneh way. Horse mauure. fresh from thu stublo, and undetenoriiited by fermentatiou, should be applied in liberal quantities to the soil be- fore planting, and well iiiti-nnixed bj' digginc! ;mrl Hiking in. If practicable, no portion ol the manure shouk, remain nearer the surface of the bed than five inches, as, nt this depth, it t be liable to diy up, und will furnish, for a con-ideruble portion of the season, the moKt healthy pasturage nrd aliment lo the plants. The most successful method ol securing yood fruit, is to transplant vidmg the roots into as innny and minute por- tions as possible; can; being had, however, to preserve on each division, a heallhy and unin- jured jni.it. Some recommend coverirg Ihe feurfuce of the soil, between and under the plants with dry straw, just before the fruil itpens. This precaution obviates the likeli- hood of injury to the b.irries in consequence of their coming iu contact with, or beating in- to the sand by Charcoal fol owino- method of his unusually fine 'ooliing, closely shaven face or the Indian Ocean, which was within sixty day's joun-ey. the oldest map of Califor- nia. San Francisco is laid do vu'as the "G Ad- en Ga'pt which is Scripture phrase. We r.i.n find no other location but Cuhfot nia for Ophir. Major nn ihpu l- nt 1" Ka-t water J- A' NOON AN, Affent. 31tf KltJUJV LU '1CI nww brings the smile oiice more to her pale and the rose to her cheek. Bo not intraue on her; do not seek with impertinent cunott- ty to fathom her Stay but a HANDS. A gentleman playing whist with an intimate friend, who seemed as far as hands were concerned, to hold the Mahomedan doctrine of ablution in supreme contempt, said to him with a countenance in sorrow than in 'My good fellow, if dirt were trumpa, what a hand you would have Dissolving tU He-n. Thaddeus Ste- vens, in a letter from Washington to a gentle- man in Huntiniitpn, says: ,'We dissolve the Union here every day, but it heals up .the following night, and the next morning is aa sound and (strong as if- it bad never been dissolved to be disfigured vith a moust'.iclie. On his arrival in town he called on a lady and was shown down into .he parlor. A young imp, the pride of the amtly, slvly opened the door nnd peeped i i; but on seeing the vis- itor, ran frigditen -d to her mother, crying' 'Ma, ma, what's tl e man got his mouth way up in his hair for? call. heard th( inquiry and made a short We cannot undi rstund how it is that deli- cate young too delicate to run up and down stairs in their own houses, arc able to dance down ihssti ingest men in n ball-room. 'Tis, a phcnomenot of nature of which no one seems csipnble of giving an explanation. What youn? girl ;vcr refused n handsome partner at five o'cl f murder "Yon are tobe hanged, und I hop it wilt be a warning td you A conundrum srtittca 'correspondent asTts is an ubse it preacher, like the fn- tureV unlew it "Because he is not the Ptut-or present." up lengthwise in the center ot the road about five feel high, being nine feel wide a; the bot- tom and two nt the top, and then covered with straw and earth in the manner of coal pits. The sarth requirpd to cover the pile, taken from either side, leaves two {rood ditches, and the timber, although not spli is easily char- red, and when charred, the earth is removed to the sides of the ditches, the coal raUd down to a width of fifteen feet, leaving it two feet thick at the centre and one at the sides, and the road is completed. A road thus made in MicUigan cost per mile, and is said tobe very compact and tree from murf or dust. At a season when the mud on the adjoining earth r-iad was half ax- letiee deep, on the noal road, there was not the least standing, and the impress of the feet of a horse passing rapidly it was liUe that made on hard washed sand, as the surf recedes, on the shore of the lake.' A NI-.W j'HASi: OF re'- niarlis ol Mr. Djvyr at Tamnmny Uall though coming in near the end of the procee- and therefore crowded out of our re- port, in subManci He mail tained iliat in her lale TJt-vohitiop, France hud aoiie jiibt as far as America arn-r hcrli.alr. She proclaimed political Institu- tions css-entiully like our own; bul, HKe its, ief' untouched the monopoly ol lu-i --oil. Tho idleness am' destruction which hud grown up in her cities under the old system, ivsKei'. for employment and tin: es- tate'- of the Hunrbon nobility born thus confis- cated, iis were their worthless title.- and dee- had the soil of Franco been available to the men of France, that employ- ment and that rewaui would have brcn cured. But instead of adopting this wise polio the Lnmartine Government invented fireat im- practicable workshops, in -Ahull they propos- ed to d.ii'y einplcymont-and daily to Jwo or three hundr >d thnusand This impossibility thj-obuh HI a few (Is, fliniLCr and returned. Thf pablic in its first and !.i--t ut- terly fiii led. And there France-lay, :i gprelru-Je lo tho te in her the houi of her victor} a vir-tm i The tiiitiotib of Europe, which line! avisen to her ti limpet-call, Itsoketl ut cond.tioi'i now, and th-siiiht pa'sicd their liahi Of what value a IJepublic, if those were to be 'ts fl uiN] So U ll libe 'ty. Had France scciind to her people a lioine and an independence on her sod, dijT'i'- ent to day would be the (life of Europe. And France did not do this, because Amor- iea did i o! give her lial.t to   friendship of jeople oar shadow, keeping while we walk in but dwmtiitg uu enter the   

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