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Waukesha Daily Freeman: Wednesday, June 10, 1925 - Page 1

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   Waukesha Daily Freeman (Newspaper) - June 10, 1925, Waukesha, Wisconsin                               AMD MR id Ickrlltlig Dtpt, 548 JBdHorlal, AdT'UdBg 804. VOL. V, XO. ISC (SUCCEEDIM! TUB HERALD VOL. II, NO. 188.) JUNB 10, 1926. PUBLISHED PAINLEVEONWAYT I PEACE, BUT PROMISES JIIKFIAXS Ml'ST AGRKK TO STOP III' 1SLAJT, KKAJiCK by United Tress) Premier Painleve of France today inaugurated a new era In states- W.' Hutton, Dashing out of Toulouse, soon af- >'ctcor Iaw enforcement of the ter..dawn, by soared o! Wtoconalu SHELLS HIT AMERIGAN T. B. BILL ADJOURNMENT _________rj LATEST ran MAY KEEP LMIEOI forth to Morocco to obtain lirstliund information on the French campaign against the Riffians. A. L. Bradford, United Press Paris manager, accompanied the premier to Toulouse, nnd will follow him by airplane to the Moroccan' front. Before stepping into Hie ;airplane 'that Is now bearing him into the war front, the French premier outlined to Bradford, in an Interview, present policy as to Morocco. He wants peace .In Morocco, but only af- ter Abd El Krim has ceased stirring the Moslem world against France. lilookiide Premier Painleve also revealed that he wants and expects a Franco- Spanish accord which will he pre- pared to tell'Krim what peace terms Wilt be accepiable. He proposes a Joint blockade againsl arms and food supplies to the Riffians. For the first time in history, a to confer with his military advisers, is making bis way by air lo a battleground of French soldiers, to see for himself what tile situation ,is, and to 'gather material whereon to shape bis future couise. Painleve announced before hop- ping off into the skies at G o'clock this morning that lie would go directly to tlie front and there get first-hand Impression's. He intends to confer with his .juIj.Kwcy. .il.ircci.ors, General Count de Chambrun; Colonel Freydenberg and Colonel Colombat. Tlie premier's party arrived hero Irom Paris at a. m. was not IVT.OO early, however, for group .'of officials to greet him. Ttfe mayor and other dignitaries .of tVfe city, dressed in formal garb, welcomed him as he descendoA from Ills tritln and brief speeches wo.-p e.x- A'nti-Saloon league, has .tentatively accepted a position as organizer and head of the Arizona Anti-Saloon league, he announced today. "I am now on an extended vacation and In about a month I expect to leave for Arizona." Belgian balloon "Prince Leopold" is the of- ficial winner of the Gordon Bennett Clip race, having landed Touriniaii, Spain. at Capl I'IKKSVILLE, (U. P.) The trial of Congressman John Kcn.tucky Itepublican charged with drunkenness, was continued indefin- itely when called in Ibu city court tills afternoon. The complaint against I.anRley was signed by a woman. Langley came to. court with his attorney a few. hours after being-re- leased from jnil where be served a lOhour .sentence for contempt of court. (U. Barn- ard, Spring Green, will lake Hie stand this afternoon in Iho vice- gntfl-lobbying testify to the- r.art cSnators A. E.'Gary nnd Olaf ohnsoii are alleged io have played n the Moran "kidnaping" episode. Resumption of testimony by. Attov- ley General Herman Ekern, inler- officers lent n Vouch their brilliant VVmi- changed. while of color with forms. Is Historic MJssion Pausin. only long enough for a bit of breakfast. Painleve boarded an airplane at G o'clock off on liis historic mission. Trailing .him In two other airplanes were General iacquemot aiid M. Laurent Eynac of the aviation service. The planes mounted well and stack their noses- into' Ihc dawn, heading out for the azure of the Med- iterranean and the scorching battle- fields -of 'Morocco- where .French and itiffians. long have been fighting. From Pcrpignai) came word that the party In three planes sped over there and headed toward Spain with two other. planes .trailing. Every precaution has been taken for the premier. He .is flying in one of the best machines of France's mighty air fleet a'nd bis pilot is a moil who knows every inch of the way between the capital and the bat- tleground. 'ftikCN .Tourney Cnlnily Painleve's machine was the first to rise Into the clouds. Though ,thc 'premier Is past middle age, he did not manifest the slightest emotion about bis Journey. He was dressed in regulation avin lion costume' and as he in the airplane car, he drew on bis pieced leather headgear and over coat to shield him against the chill o the aerial heights. gan roaring. The motors he by appearance of Di1.' W. ruplei and M. J. Cleary, former iu- :urancc commissioners, will mark irogrcss of the insurance quiz near- ng a close. SHOUU) niKKKKKKTIATK HK- TWKKX THUE AXI> h'AI.SK TVI'K, SAYS K. I'. IIHKKSK "Economy, as a business practice, lias been receiving a great deal of at- tention lately, due to the emphatic gland whlcn our president has taken regarding economy in government expenditures, and I believe that now, or at any other time, a little straight thinking about economy is an excel- lent said R, P. Brcese, prcsi- Icnt of the National Evcliange bank, In an interview' granted, this paper. "There is wise and unwise econo- "and we between AFTER JULY! VETO IIOVIXK T. n. HILI, IF El) UY I.KGISLATI'UE MADISON1. Wis. (U. faction- al feud, centering on Sl.-tOO.OOO appro- priation to reimburse-owners of cattle which react to tubercular tests, de-. velovcd in the senate last night, and may delay closing of the 1925 session until well after July 1. A bill granting SOBO.OO for area test work for the coming year, and iOO for the ensuing 5-year period, was engrossed in the senate last night, with S90.000 available in the test fund, there will be appropriated tor eradication work in tho next year, under provisions of the. bill. The measure Increases the fund available for indemnities, from 000 to a year, test proviso of tho The area re- old was stricken from Iho statute hooks last Iiidicallous are the executive will veto the engrossed bill if passed by tho 'assembly. TO IN AFFAIR .MADISON'. Senators A. 15. Carey; secretary, of the civil service commission, and Olaf Johnson, admin- istration leader, promised to reward George-. Clark, .discharged, senate -.po- In "the Mo'ran 'kidnaping it is slated In n signed affidavit 'by Frank A. Barnard, Spring Green, filed in evidence in the1 graft-vicc-lobbying probe. Depositions signed by principals In the Mbran disappearance "plot" were placed on record. A letter -from Sennlor Gary to George Clark, dated June 1C. several days after (he disappearance, waii filed. Is Very ('crieous The best wishes to you, with the hope -that you enjoy your party as much as we did the fight." Carey wrote. A deposition by Clark describes a mooting with SncaloTS Garey and Johnson, at Middleton. testified to on tho stand last week. John M. Shearer, Miidison detective, told the committee .he paid Clark tor services during the spring of O924. Shearer said he was investigating a matter not connected with the Moran SHOT -TO EMPLOYE .MILWAUKEE; Frenzied by the refusal of Galliin tannery officials 10 give him back, his old-Job as assist- ant Klstis, 36, walked into the plant' today, shot anil killed 58, foronuin; seriously injured a bystander, Mrs. Mary. Pawllk, '30, and then turned the gun on -himself.'- With blood streaming .from the wound In his bead, plant employes" held KIstiB un- til police He was then removed -to a hospl.lpl where it is said he will recover. Hp was served with a murder war- rant shortly after noon. Two weeks ago, Kistls was dis- charged after Mrs. Minnie Tegcneyec bad beaten him Into insensibility, Judge Shauglmcssy fouuil her nol guilty after she related alleged inlfn treatment and torment by Klslls, "plot" Moraii and that his findings affair were incidental the his real business. Shearer was never paid for affidavits and documentcs col- lected from agents in the disappear- ance episode, which were turned over to Senator Severson ns fuel for inves- tigation, he said. Mr. IJreese continued, must learn to distinguish the two. Economy which means spending no money for any purpose whatever is poor 'economy, everyone will agree. "The farmer who economizes by not MINNESOTA, WISCONSIN ARE COLDEST SPOTS In sharp contrast to buying paint for Ins barn when it j w mogt Qf ,-rt ,1.-, I n t li n c T-11 11 fft t FELLOWSiN IALEET HEV. A'. S'. HAItfiEK DELIVERS ADDRESS-O.V 'THIS OCCASION AREIFFEflING, SAYS AGENT HAY .AND 'SMALL GR'AIN CROPS WILL BE "LIGHT. CORN STILL HAS A CHANCE It Is not a rnln doo3 not come shortly Wnukosha Bounty farm crops will are suf- arliig at lack statement the present timo of moisture was' the made by County Agent the county iigeul." blossomed out. II Tuesday evening was file-date -of a [lotable service by the': lo- cal lodge of Odd No? 193, when Rev. Dr. A. S. Badger delivered the following "We are now assembled to com- memorate the lives of those of pur number who are ;no longer but'have entered into the silent chain-" hers of dcrilb. "In my Imagination, 1 sec n lioine consisting.of father! 'mother, an.d chll-' rtren. house J. F. Thomas lo the Freeman today, In reviewing Ihe crop situation in ,tbe county. With the exception of corn, all other crops arcs affected said Mr. Thomas and although rain- within tho next few days will help somo it is nearly time for culling- the hay nnd little benefit will resuil. "Alfalfa Is being cut at tho present added turitod nnd honed by the fanners that tho second crop wilt receive sufficient rains to help Ihc situation for the season. hays uru likewise short. Thnolhy, rod clovor and ulsac cloveV which will ho cut wllhin Iho next two weeks is but a few Inches aliove the ground and many farmers will Ic-ave Die crop uncut for seed. Tho hay'-sit- uation although nol llin best'this yr.ar is not one which will harm the fnrm- ,er as much had not the last year been a bumpjjf bay season. Many had large quaiilltle's last year which will rdllrtvc tlie 'some oi- tept. Speaking of the pastures .Mr. Thoiiius said. "Except for Ihe low are finding It n hard timo' to .secure milk producing pnslnrriRO. Although th'n low lands liavii not bi-e'ii seriously affecled yet the pasluraijo :on those portions arc not the best :cattle and have little nulritlvo, (valup. Somo of lha farmers Suddenly, Painleve recalled be had forgotten his cane. true I-atin fervor be tlculatcd wildly to his friends, on needs paint lo protect the structure j from the weather ful. Using worn uui. f lh that take valuable hours from farm has escaped the col'd. Wisconsin and Minnesota arc the coldest spots. aeunily wiste- thc 13 ln actually waste weathcf-. Fore- out implements wealher bureau reported. Part of the east work for patching them up is unwise. In neither case, is there Climbing the porches of In which resides this family, are blossoming vines of he'auly; trees, of which .Bryant sang, .'Father, Thy hand hath reared these venerable columns', and (lowers and shrubs en- viron it. "However. Ihe superlative Joy of this home is found, not In these ex- ternal oxcelences and beauties, charm- ing as they are. but within, in the love of one for another. "A cloud arises upon- Ibis family circle. Tb'ere is a darkened room; there are hushed voices; there are tears: there is a gathering of people; there is a procession to the sleeping ground of the dead: after which there is a great void in this home. "But this Is a Christian family, anrtj the Christ who stood Ihe side of Mary and Marlba at the grave of Lazarus. mingling His tears with theirs, has been with" them through Ihesc scenes, and they have been com- forted. Mfmory Holds.Past "Time passes, even Into years; but memory holds the past to the present. The voice of child, pareul.j linv Im- Adam; Reltz fortiymUi In "this score.' Sweet clover was sowed Hit1' lands which 'raised oats last season nnd It was the Inlcnllon to 'plow it under as fertilizer. r ..The drought, however, had resulted a i-liangf- o" mind and tha cnttlo qre now being pastured In those fields which -linva.nn abundant crop. "There will little straw in the oals and rye said Mr. Thomas. "Oats" are about ready to head out and most of the stalks are- but or three feet tall. I. list year at this time the rye and oat crops were sev- eral feet lull. Corn has not suffered materially as yet and If wo have rain there should be a good crop. RESOLUTION ON BEER IS LOST AMERICAN WOMEN1 AND CHIL' DREN MQVE FROM DANGER ZONE. COXLEGE STArF MOVESj? Carfton caii hospital at Canton> has, struck by the..lighting W tweon Yunnanese arid v Cantonescf boon MADISON, WIs. (U. Wisconsin Anti-Saloon league showed Us hand In the senate today anil the Meggers resolution 'memorlallz-' troops, Consul. Jen Ing congress to call a consllfullonal kins reported to "the'state depart ment today. Jenkins lias prqt.eT.led contention for the purpose of repeal- Ing the eighteenth amendment went Into the discard, .13 to 1. Urys claimed a double victory In the upper house following action of .'moved from tho danger Senator PolakowskI in withdrawing Jenkins' ndvicu who has' ii motion lo appeal from the decision today. Jenkins' against the Tiring on' foreigners though no one was hurt. f American women and children -.1 pone on of Lieutenant Governor Huber, who lasl week ruled the 1920 hcer vefer- e'ndum, cited as Inoperative by At- torney General Ekern, cannot: be at- tached as n rider to n pending 1'oln- kowsk! dry law revision bill. Indications arc the referendum will go to the state supreme court for decision as lo its constitutionality. RE ELECTED AS TSECRETARY PI.AX IIKCKPTIOX .TO YVIYKSS MKN AT If. S. HOS- ITAT, foreigners to avoid tho fighting Describing tho progress of the war, the department, oh the basis of Jenkins' report, made the follow mg> statement: "l''irhiK continues with growing- in, tho opposing troops filing at i cacti other across the dl vldlng the city proper from llonjui Island. Cinnboats, loyal to eminent frequently ran. through Ihto .waterway and lived point blanl into" the native city." AMERICAN COLLEGE 3TAFF TAKEN TO SAFETY pea crop poor." blossoming and is Tho very Ml no Edith Mlllcii, general secre- tary of the Wnukeslm Women's Christian association, for two years, was unanimously chosen to continue this administrative work for the nexl flsctil year, 'at the June meeting ,of the hoard of directors Monday evening. Miss Mitten. In the opinion of tho hoard, has carried the work most competently 'and Ihe in- creasing Usefulness iiRsocln- llon Is Indicated: by l'ie widening cjrclo of, its fricnd.i and patrons. Its roster of members now stands at the 900 mark, and during May, per sons visited the headquarters. The May activities included twen- ty-two meeting of "Y." clubs, six of non.assoclallnn groups, eight confer- ences, and n lotal of fifty-five persons who availed themselves of tlie "Y.'s" service to Individuals through ils registry and 'omptoymcnf: depart- ments and other channels of assis- ancn and counsel. ('limps llnld Inlrrosl With the coming of summer, regu- nr club work Is largely snspened and nterest centers on camp and con- 'erenr.e programs. HONO American ataH of Iho Christian collego at Canton vii being lakeiutoday lo places of safcl) by.J an American gunboat while Chinese students massed "iround the college, demanding Hint' fropp> dopqr.t. Mr. and Mrs. Prank "Grnmnlon >Slr.'and Mrs. Montgomery Ogdon of the Christian college we're llred 6h any economy at all. gesi tbe ground. "Wiere is It, where Is he shout- ed smilingly, while the others chaffed him for bis absent-mindedness and scurried about to get it. DRYAGlTSffliTY OF LAjniOlATION CLEVELAND, J. K. Russell, former Ohio prohibition director, M. B. Copeland, his assistant, and Warren E. Barnett, Columbus attor "But. refraining from spending money recklessly, or from doing in- to debt for things which 'do not add to the efficiency of a person, espe-l olally at this time when the whole i country Is just gelling back lo nor- In some spots of CARROLL PLAY ATTRACTS MANY TO AUDITORIUM AND DIRECTED BY PROF. MAY" N. RANKIN IS SUCCESS these states the thermometer foil to of a low of 42 degrees today. _ Chicago's low today was 54, a drop o( 35 degrees from yesterday's P brother, sister, husband, wife, as the case may be. though silent to t'li ex-j ternal par. is still heard by 'lit: The elernal contest between love memory. The once familiar (Continued on Page 4) mal conditions Is true economy and should be practiced and commended. I "Do not misunderstand me. I do Colder weather is due tomorrow, Cox slid. The- change in weather is due to the earthward movement of a strata not want to seem to advocate holding; back and slowing up normal healthy j ___________ i progress. If we are timid we cannot rprkllllllD TO HI 111 expect to bring about' prosperity, j WAIIIJN ANO III "LAN iNelther does the president, as I see, lw it, advocate an synch thing, j "What wo do need ia the wit- Three Protestant Demominatlon in Canada Are United I ness to spend are necessary. for the things .which and a firm refusal to RIVER CLEAN-UP TORONTO, Ont. Tbe United church of Canada, representing the most important step' toward proles- tant unity in the history of religion, was born today. Forsaking their Individuality, Ca; After al'v, true economy is.simply "t, clear thinking about what will ng about solid prosperity, and then ney and politician were foijnd concentrating onr efforts and the in federal court here today of coir- funds at our disposal so that they will A meeting of the local chapter of nnillan organizations of Presbylerian; put our money into non-essentials. lzaak Wallon lcague Melriodlst and Congregational ambition, the struggle in a man's heart to decide which he wants most, a career in the vocation of bis choice or a wife and home, that Is the Jiasls of the play "Yon and I" chosen by (he Carroll Players for the play of 1925. are two couples involved in tjie action of the play, the father and mother, Koderick and Nancy White played by E. Ben Weinke and Miss Katherine and son.and sweet- heart, Maltland While and Veronica 'Dunne, presented by Bertha Phillips and Erwln Huenlnk. Father wanted to be an artist but married the gill of his choice and went into a soap factory to make money enough for yesterday by Ynnnauuse trodpB whiffl tryinb' lo make liiclr way acrdss the river In a launch. Mrs. Cinmplon was wounded in Uic.iii'in: their nil dresse.3 were given as New York City; Tho Cramptons wore s ud yeste (o have loft Orange, N J some time ago to go lo Cnnlon.' It is hou, over, tho custom of conic abroad to claim'New York is a lesi dence. If they live in the neighbor hood of Hint city. VOTE MEX FOR SHANGHAI thousand demon stralors. pnrticipntini; In u meeting before the .central entrance to th forhiddct] city, voted to send 000_, 000 (mex.) I'orj tlie relief of the Shanghai strikers. Resolutions were adopted favoring- China taking back forei0n coneys S sion.i. t'oinjiensations for ot the Shanghai shoollng und withdraw al of Ilritisli and Jagianese consuls The demonstrators parlded the city, despite a thunderstorm but sation quarter. The directors decided on Monday to enter le evening, to send four business and In- lustrla! girls to the ten-day confer- ence al Lake Okobojl and three to the annual town and city conference at College camp, CJeneva. In each case'the ilolegales will carry a share of their own expenses. A recent addition to the magazine table at the "Y." is the monthly copy of Outdoor .Life, which comes through TENANT AWARDED IN Mrs VERDICT' _____ .the family. Son has gifts as an courtesy of the Izaak Walton league. Another InloresUnK literary visitor is the Chinese Y. W1. C. A. magaxine, titled "The Green It Is print- ed In Chinese and while not intelli- gible to the average American girl Is being looked through with much in- terest as a tangible evidence of the aroung-the-globe scone of the As- sociation. Mrs. 0. H. I.indholm. chairman of the young women's council, reported enthusiastically on Ihe progress of Hie Co-Getters, a comparatively new club of industrial and employed girls. which has a membership of twenty- six and is displaying a marked de- gree of originality In working out Its program. Hnffrdiln licslhavcii Wives A coming social occasion will be the open-house for the wives of the U. S. Hospital men. which comes on June-2.3. with the women of the ser- vice committee as hostesses. Mrs. Jessie Fetters is the committee cbalr- suit was If. E. N'ipc. complainant in a brought against Harry Burnell, awarded in a verdict in circuit' court, on Tuesday. The ease a contiact for Ihe lease of a farm: NIpo being the lessor. A divorce was granted by Judge C. M. Davlson, on Tuesday, to Mrs.. Isa- bel Earl, against her husband, Arling: ton Karl of Milwaukee. The degree was entered on grounds of cruel arid inhuman treatment and subsequent; desertion. Another action for divorce; filed by a Milwaukee resident, was scheduled for today. Winifred J. of that city asked annnlincnt-'of riis marriage to Mary Werle, which took place in Waukegan, In 1021; on the grounds that he had been drink- ing on the day of the ceremony and was not conscious of. the seriousness and purpose of the.event on Friday evening, at-the Y. M. C. A., churches Joined hands al 3 o'clock at llnal plans name of "The United will be made clean up Fox .under thejilect and Is about to start for Paris Church onto s'tudy when he falls In love, decides j I'OUGHKKEPSIE, N. Y. (U. P.) nplracy to violate the' federal law. prohl- do the maximum amount now and for the future." of for the campaign to Canada" and in the future the j that be cares more more for the girl Only eighteen of Ihe 270 girls in tlie tmuii up rux river, .which laudable 000 adherents of those three for Ihe profession and also goes graduating class of Vassnr college undertaking has been undertaken by inatlons will worahlp under one rooMi'lntn the soap factory to be assured confessed lo being engaged when an- good, organization.' A program.will al- A total of congregations so be presented .at the meeting. been united. Income for marriage. I-ovo nouncements were made at the. Scn- (Gontlnued on Page lor supper. ARHATO.Y JVAJf OX CIIAKRE OF STIilKIXG MOTHFJt.iNVLAW 'was Wed- Wlliard Porter, MukwonaRO arraigned in Municipal court, ncsday morning, on a charge sanltlng his mother-in-law Airs lie Clark. The case was continued for preliminary hearing. It al- so alleged thr.l Mr. Porter struck .Mr. Clark, the altercation occurring its the result of a heated argument over domestic affairs..   

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