Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Watertown Chronicle (Newspaper) - December 15, 1852, Watertown, Wisconsin                               VOL. 27. N1CLE, 15, 1852. WHOLE NO. 287. WATERTOWN CHRONICLE. PUBLISHED EVERY At A HAiwLEir. rpTTIHTl Terms ef Subscription ani Advertising. 30 i-iiVriuoiiis will clmrscil.wliun Hiu Ollifi-vv All paper is delivered by liic niirnur. AifVKIlTISlNCi. One cii'uimi per your, yaper..... Ilulfuulllliiii. Ciiuirlui- column........................ Kijjhih coin !uss.) lirm iiisorlion For cadi .sulisoiiiiUiit Legal unticc.-j ;il rates [in.'sunbci j by law. Nu in' Varaacs urc tinkssiit ilic imWUIiur'B option Business und ulker lellers must .WO 00 -JO 00 IS! DO 7 00 0 31) 85 until ar- PliTKll SKA1JURG, Notary Public- ami l.am! Agc-ut, U la. JHtADLEY NOYBS, M. niysiciiiii nnil Surgeon, Bcuvur Dam. If W. II. BOURNB, Dealer in Geneva! Dry Hoods, ai-uuuries aiirt Uiivnor ofihdnjiiMNQrat su-cols, T.TE. BOOMER, Utonicy anil Counsellor at Law--OIIioc in D.Jonos' Brick'Block, Wntc.towa. W.C.Sl'ALDING, M. D. iu the Emi'i i'OHTKR. liROTUER, Propriotcira of iliu United Stales Hotel, i'ox Doilge eo. D. P. WEYMOUTH, Attorney anil Cour.M'Hor at Law, Solicitor in Clianc-e- rv au'l Xotarv Public-, jclluivoii, 'Ml B. HUHUJUT, Attorney tuid Counsellor at Law, Sulicitorin Chance- ry mid Hilary Public. YUUJAM DUTCI1KR, Attorney CimnsclUirat Law and .Solicitor in Can- .lellrrsnii ro. "UAIRD, ,w, Dodjjo Center- und Coiiusellur.s at L D..ilirc eo. FOUNTAIN, ;iinl lleta'.l and dealer in Paints Oils, Jjyc- ______ .1ACOB SivlNNKH, Altornovainl ut Law. 1'iilniyra. All luisi- iifssrntrustuil to his euro and laithlully nt- tendcdto. _ _ JUUSOX I'llKN of en. All U'isiiiess oniruato-l lo .us utlv uil-juded lo. A ill! rew, fan? pnmiMtt v nnd Ceiiti-r 1'. O. T. .1. jONKS, Dealer ii, ]Vv Caps, Koui's. ni ailie tl e Kivi CHARLES AlKliN, V- su iho One I'riuu Attorney, v Courts i.f the chor.i'n. il'.lrn-l llie I it' flCfc-i'c1' J ircuit und Supremo lii'siilencr, Little .1. A. Dotinly Clerk ut'-.lm Circuit nnd Coumy Courts ol .Tel- fiM-.son county. I ol iuientiun ofc nvleili-'incnt ol' Fl'fl'ERSON b MAMMNER, Dealers in UryGuo.ls. Groceries, Crotkory, Hoptsnnil Shuc" Books ami r-uiiioncry, and LiqaoM. CarpciiterM1 undCoopers Tools. NiiiK Susli, (Jlai'S, I'ntly, at the Dutch iun-o. ___________ Attortiovanil CounvfiU.r ut Law. Cathedral Music. FT CHAULS3.MACKAY. Tuo iinthcm censed, tlio kneeling women rose; Tire long nislou slowly emptied of tlio crowd, Ilul elill llie organ pealed its solemn toncis} Touched by n mighty mttnur of urt, It cjiiveits will of melody tor his. He pltiyod u Voluntary lo himself. Unconscioim of n listener. WbaUie dreiimcO1 novor I thai heard him play Shaped hHinviginnlion to suit my own, And formed lliem Into his: Thelow.mifl notes Trickled upon each other, like tho drip Of raid in summer upon trees and llowern. Anil wandered Unco (loop in ilio grass, Through ngraou moaiUiw piuil with butler cups, Viilerinn, daisies anil wild hyacinths. I heard the murmur o( a In'ook, Wluxie liiinliil wiitui-KMpnrkloil to lha Upon brink a troop ol'children Fair lioys, with chubby cheeks nnd hutching eyes, And girls, with ringlets waving In iho wind They braided garlundsof tho mciuinw flowers, lied tlicni up with luislics; I could hoar Their joyous laughtor and thuir aitlcna lulls The song of binels-birdsin the neighboring copsD, Tlic trumpet of liic gnat, ihe ben's louil burn, Tlio click of grssslioppcre. like meeting spears. Anoutlie organ poured a deeper strain, And carried me fur -away. In llie green meadows, milesnml miles adown A lengthened river, widening evormore. I lawns nnd cities on its I heard the pealing of tlio holiiiuy bolls, And roar of people in die market place, Tlic Hupping ul'the saila of merchant Bhips Luilcn willi corn, lliat wiili each flowing lido Camuupwiirilsto the towns: I heard Ilio creak Ot'ttlnurfsnnit il nipping anchors in ihe ports, A chorusnt the capstan, of the cresvs. As round am! round they lixxl with moasured steps, Aiul all llie busllcol'liieir biiny life. An-.l still Hoods of sound The unsGcn music-kin his keys, Transported me u willing auditor, Where'er Ins fancy deep full tones Grow deeper, i'ulku', louder, more sublime, Until Ihe waves of music swelled to seas Whoso angry billows, vvliiie with ercsls ofToam, Hustled willi impclnons thuhiTers on die land. The moon withdrew- hersplendorl'roin tin; clouds, Amlhidlturscil'in wiml rose And I'oju-eu in chorus with tho exulting sea, That answered it willi llininlcr-s ol' its own. llaiii.-hail and avalancheofsprny, Hi'oko in nnd sea and sky, Or.uu-e on in woi'hls of sound, '.rite discords evormore; Duly ;o meet und I'U.H: in harinonies. Anon the lightning flashed upon '.lie ilaik, Anil thunder rallied o'er ihe cloudy viuiit, As il'lho chariots ol'thc heavenly host Drove lo llie jii.k'iin.'iil-sciU, nnd last day by ihe trumpet iif'llie ftiherea. The echoes rolled through tiie cathedral nisles Ami dieil in silonce. Lo. tiie round full moon Peered from I jr.- bosom of tiie riiteil cloud The mink raging seas grew culm, While loud clear voicesfrjm the upper air Sang hi KWOCI harmonics, The Lord U great, His loving kmilncsu lasts forevermore" W.cll, ,ne iiainu iu- taxinjf 'as.j'f a guilt had .sud-. may as, well, go to ruin at no une i.u niy Iryinjr to do body hatea and body cares about may us. well go to ruin at.onc.l.! Tall Ihe woman, who atoor] far eno.ugii for flight..if lliiit. sh.ou.ld.be ncces- ho.w camo'you to go so young.to lliat ilrcadfiilpluce? Where 'Qh boy, w.illi a, burst of thai was terrib.lo.to. behold, 'oh I haint hat) no mother since I waa ii baby. If I'd on- ly had u continued, hie anguish growinjf .the tears gushing out his slriingij.srcy I wouldn't 'a been'bound-out, arid kicked, .and laid on lo whips.' I wo-jldii't 'a been saucy, and got knocked down, anu run away, anil then slolo because. I liungry. Oh 1 haint go! "P hainl-gut nu mother linint had no niolbor since I was a baby.' Tho ftrniiQth wins all Rone, -from the poor boy, and he aank on his Iviiens dubbing great olibkini; sutiu. and inn hot tours a- with his (ioor idinchlcu. And d.d thai stand ihoro Did ahr> bid him coldly to iiac'U up and ba the jail birdt sho .had boon a mother, anu though all nor children slept under the coliJ soil ill tho lie waa a mother edit. She went up tu that poor boy, not to has- ten him away, but lo -lay lier finger kindly, shftly on his tell him to look up, anil from henceforth find in her. a eiea put amis, more that pity- ingly, about the neck of ih'at forsaken, deser- ted ahe poured from her mother's heart sweet, womanly of couneel .and tenderness. Oil! how uwcel was her elfep that night; how soft her pillow! She hail linked a poor mifferini; to hnrs 'by the must ail ken. the strongest bands of love; ehe had plucked soina thorns from the path of a but striving mortal. None but tho angels could huve witnessed her joy, without envy. Did the boy loave her? Never. is with her vigorous, manly, promising youth. The low charac- ter of bin countenance has given place to an open, pleasing depth enough to mafcn it an interesting study. His foster- father ia d'nad, and his (rood foster-mother, naeil and sickly, but she liuowu no The once poor outcnst is her only depend- ence, and nobly does he repay the trust. 'He that savcth a soul from death, hidotli a multitude of Bins.' [Olive Branch. The Doctor lu spite of Himself. PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE, Jt said that the following incident sap- plied Molina with lor Ins i fellmo Citizens of the SSenale nuilgre liuij suite of himself Duhe of Muscovy, a martyr to the gout, issued a proclamation proiniBing great wcallh and honors to any one, no mat- ter, how.humble hie bo, who should Itoahle to reliavB him frnm hisauttfer- l-njj.' The wifo of ii peasant, who had jus) parties Ihe r ntttionnl congratulation that the choicei and House of Representatives Thebriefspnco which 'has elapsed since the close of: your last session has been murked by no extraordinary political e- yent. The quadrennial election of cliici' rrmgistrnte bus passed with less than usuul excitement. However individuals captain general to allow the passengers and mails to bo landed in certain cases, for n, reason which does not furnish, in the opinion of this government, a good presumptive ground for such a prohibi- has been made the subject of n se- rious remonstrance at Madrid, und 1 huve no reason to doubt Ihut due respect will be paid by the government of her Caiho- Washington, her minister for foreign I fit in hadiulhonzoil our cliarjo to nnnuunco to tho Amartcan whicli had gone to the Lobos inlanda for ibtt th4t government was willing lo freight then un its own Recount. This intention has been carried into effect by the Peruvian minister an meiV. which IM behoved to be advantageous lo the parties in interest. lie Vrmjesfy to The rejiresentations which The settlements on iho shores of tho Pa- otir minister has been instructed to irmUe cific eivcn extension and a new direction tu our commerce in that o- for.ith'e.jjoul, bui that he -did ncit like the prince well enough to ciitnmunicale Iho se- cret. peasant, wfia; imrtiedialely mim- inoned to cumt and interrogated, and] as he denied having any knowledge of iho remedy in he .received a smart flogging and wua put in prisiin. In vniii he. prottsied lhal it wasfrcnn maiiee that his wife had attrib- uted to him possession-of the remedy. A rnoresevert! flnjjelulion follownd, nnd he was told to.prepare to.have his head cut olll if.he persisted tn refusing to cure the g-mnd duke. The poor peasant, in despair, asked for fifteen days' grace, in order to'have time to procure the needful sjimplae, which delay being grunt- ed, he sent a man to Cgirbach, on The river Occa, lo collcr.l a waijon luad of horhs, which arn peculiarly large .and fine in that district. With these he made a hath, after using which tha grand duke fortunately found himself much relieved.. Thereupon the bastinado was agiiin administered to the peasant, as a punishment for Ilia previous ob- but, on tho other hand, he waa re- warded with a new coat, two hundred roub- les, and eighteen serfs foi liimaelf and his doscond-ints to perpetuity. At tho same time he, WHS forbidden, under the severest' important peniilties, to execute any revenue uuon his wife. I am assured that this couple have over since lived.together in perfect.harmony, liiis been effecled by ihn independent sul- Crnges-of u free people undisturbed by those influences which in other countries, Imve too often allflcted ihe purity of pop- uhir 'elections. Our grateful tlinnks ans due to an Ail Merciful Providence, not otily for staying the pestilence which in different forms has desolaled some of our cities, but for crowning the labors of the husbandman.' with uii abundant harvest, and. the niition generally with '.ho bles- sings of pence and prosperity. Within a few weeks tha public mind has been deeply nfiented by the death of Daniel Webster, filling ut his disease the ofjri-je of secretary of slnlc. His associates in the executive department of govern- ment have sincerely sympathised with his fitmily nisi! the public generally on this mournful occasion. His commanding till- wards the steamers employed lo curry the mails of the United Stales to Havana, with the exceptions ubove alluded to, been marked with kindness and liberality, and inJicntes no general purpose of interfer- ing with the commcruinl correspondence und intercourse between that island uiid this country. Barly in the present year, official notes were received from 1hc minsters of England and France, inviting the government of (he U. Stales lo become [mrty with GrculIJrit- ain and I'Y-inee in tripHrtitc convenlion, in vir'.iio of which ihe throe powers ehuuld sev- erally and collectively disclaim, now und for the future, till intention lo obtain possession of the of Cuba, and should IjinJ tlicm- solvcsi to disconuloDincu all altempln to that elFoct on Ihe part of any power or individual wh.vtnvc'r. Tliia invitation has heenroBpccl- fully declined, for reasons which it would re- quire loo much space in this cuimminicalion great political and piofessif mil t'0 jn ulll to think well tried patriotism, mid uropnscd nienstiie would be of very doubtful impolitic und tut- d Commissioner ml ol tillii-r iiislruiiiiMit' imdc-'i' sen I to IIMCI! or recorded in ilio suite of New York. Oilice over Molu.n Candle Manufactory, O eV.llilic th..i they are i orfitialilv of TALLOW attlie CANDLES, ri'dio ci-11. wholi-sulo irn! rotml AM) lilCADV tf'l'OlMC, Main Ki.oasl 'liili- ol tin- BY Iho a.lilit iliiiuniil nrc: 10 ,1 or Custnni Vv'ln.-at that they wish ;o .-u. all lime-. Tlio market prii'c i live, liiirley. Corn innl Oat l' Cn-t'til) nnd ml Mills n inisciiia [.nMi-n-liani iiiifl I'arnur, h'.ivii'g n he arromu.la !tbil n TIIU MTTLE OUTCAST. BI MKS. Mnyn't I slay, ma'tn? I'll thing you wood, go alter water, and do all your errands.' Tho troubled eyes of tho speaker were fill- ed with teirs. it wau a lad that stood nl the ouler door, pleading with kindly looking w'.iinun, who still lo doubt the reality of his gouil The collage nal by itself on a bleak moiir, or what in Scotland would havo hacu termed such. Thu tiina was Iho latter (ind of SiiptHinhor, and a fiorea wind ruitled Use liotighs ol tho two un'.y nrtkoil near the i en, who takes .them O 'at a lL 'in 'I'.n nd Mawnboy .Si 1 ami t'i mil! dry li'u lus. J. in ot j C'" ONOENTH.ATKJJ KXTJl ACTdlVA XI LI. A Ll'-MON U-- ir0ij.N TAIN'S 100 269 JAU1US' pltKSS HOODS.-A new assoitmen insi i-eceiveil nl llie slum of nvr, I'KTKIISOX MAI.UASKII. ilcd with a shivering sound into the narrow it for warmth nt. tin- fira. JNo'.v and-ihen a anow-flalic touch'.'d with its soft chill the i.'tii'ok of the liatoner.or win- paid for Wlieat. ffdnuss nf tha poor hoy's N.'c'. ULMlLliL'tiT. bonnnild'd finifors. The wntrinn was ovidenlly nln to grant ihii poor hoy'f n.-qi-iosl, and the peculiar look Mlainpcd upon !us feiitnrco, would hiive Bug-. iTiJtei! tu any mind idea of depravity far hf'Viirnl hi.J years. lint her woman's heart could nol resist the Borrow of those large but by no means hand- some jrroy eyes. 'Come'in, ;it any rate, till lae man cntnas hiiiuo; t'hero, sit down hy Ihe Von look UH it'y o'.i were perishing with tho drew rudn chair up to the arid casting a suspicious wlaiico at iho child from the corners of her eyes, she continued selling the 'table for sup- I'rpsently camo the Iramp of heavy whoes; the i-vas swimtr open willi a quick jnrk, anil thn 'good man' presented himself, weari- ed with Intiiir. A look of helween wife and himself; ho too scaniied llie hoy's f.ice with fin expression not evincing salis- hctinn, but ncvorlheloas nmdu him come to Ihe table, and then enjoyed the zest with which he despatched his mppar. Day lifter day passed, and yet the boy beg- to bo kept 'only till so the CAN'T HE is theory of weakness, indecision, indifference, and indolence. What can'1, be done? Some- thing tliut some oilier man has Well, you can do it; or you can do some- tiling towards doing if. At all events you can try. Until you have Willi resolution, application, uncl industry to do a one is justified in say- ing it can't be done." The in such a case is a mere excuse for not attempt- ing to do anything at till. You remem- ber the story of Robert Bruce and the spi- der in the cave. Trying to climb to a certain point, the spider fell to the ground again and again; but still the little crea- ture rose again to the task, and at the. fortieth effort it succeeded. said Bruce, if a spider can succeed after so many failures, so can I uftsr my de- and ho sallied from liia hiding place wilh new hopes, rallied his mon, and ultimately conquered. So in all things. We must try ol'ten, and ti y with increas- ed resolution to succeed. Failure seems but lo discipline the strong; only the weak are overwhelmed by is. Difficulties draw forth the best energies of a They reveal to him hie strength, and train him to thu exercise of his noblest powers. Difficulties iry his patience, his energy, and his working faculties. They test the strength of his purpose, and ihe force of his will. "Is there :i. says John Hunter, whom ciifficultiosiio noldishenrt- bv the throat and with them? That kind of man never fails." John 'Hunter himself, orig- inally ;t working carpen'.er, was precisely n man of lhal ssorl; ami from making chairs on weekly wages, he rose to be'.he first surgeon and physiologist of his time. Influence of n Newspaper. A'school teacher who has been engaged a long time in his profession, and witnessed llin influence of a newspaper upon the minds of a family of children, writes to ihe editor of the Sentinel as foilawa I h-ive found il lo be a universal faat with- out exception, that those scholars of bulb EOXCS and uf all ages, who luve had accefls to newdpapers at home, when compared with who have not, 1. Hotter readers, excelling in pronunci- ation and emphasis, and consequently road nioro UPuVrstandinrrly. 2. They aro heller spellers, and define svordit with greater ease find accuracy. 3. They obtain A practical knowledge of in almost half tho time it re- (juiras oihere, ns the newspaper has made thnrn familiar with the loculinn of the im- portant places, nations, their governments and on the glubo. 4. They are better grammarians, for hav- ing become so familiar with every variety of Ktyls, in the newspaper, from the common place aJvortiaement to the fininlvec! and clas- Kical n.-alion of Ihe staUfiinan, they more readily comprehend lha meaning of thu text, anil consequently analyze its construction with accuracy. 5. They write better composition, bolter .language, containing more Ihoughtu more cletriy and connectedly oxprcsHcd. 6. Thaea men who have for yearn bficn readers of the are always taking the lead in debating; nociety, exhibit- ing a more extensive knowledge upon a greater variety of subjects, and expressing their views with grealor fluency, clearness correctnoae in iheir uee of Ungnagoi. WOHKI.NO can- not love them with clieeka like the his long and faithful services in the most public trusts, have caused his death lo bs lamented throughout the coun- try, and have earned for him a lasting place in our history. In tiie course of the lust summer con- siderable anxiety was caused for a short time by an official intimation from the gov- ernment of Great Britain, that orders had been given for the protection of lire fishe- ries upon the coast of the Hrilish Provin- ces in North America, against the alleg- ed encroachments of fishing vessels of the United Stales and France. The shortness of this notice, and the season of Ihe year, seemed to make it a matter of urgent im- portance. It WHS) at first apprehended lhal increased naval forces had been or- dered In the fishing grounds lo into direct the British interpretation of those provisions in iho convontion of 1318, in reference to the true intent the two guv- ernmenis differed. It was soon discover- ed that such was not the design of Great Britain, and satisfactory explanations of the real objects of'.he measure have been given both and in London. The un- adjusted difference, however, between the two governments, as to ihe interpretation of tha first article of the convention of 1818, is still a matter of importance. Our fishing vessels within i) or 10 years have been excluded from waters to which they had free access for 25 yesrs after the ne- gotiation of the treaty.' In 18-15 this ex- clusion was relaxed no far as concerns the Hay of Fundy, but the just and liberal in- availing1. however, in common wilh Keveral of my directed lhal the minis- tern of France and be asssurcd lhal the United SiateB entertains no dwignH a- Ciiha, but thut, on llie conlrary, I should its incorporation into the un- ion at, Ihe present lime, as fraught with fin- rions peril. Were thi'i island .Iciititnte of population, or occupied by n Itin- :lretl ruco. I it, if voluntarily ceded by Spain, its a nio.-it desirable ncrjuisi- tiun; but under wxirtinjf circiurieUnoc'.0, I .shuuld look upon its incorporation into our union as a very hsziivilons mcafUi'C. II wiiuhi into tliu confederacy a pop- ulation of a J.iuirenl national a (iltfurcnl language, anJ nol lilioly to liViriu- unixo with ill'.' other members. Il would probably elVnol in a prejudicial manner, the j industrial interests of the Routli, and it. niij'hl revive llinse conflicts uf opinion bylvvecn the j clifloreiil licclioriij the country, which hue- i ly ehuok the ncion lu its center, and whicli have been BO happily compromised. The rejection by ih'i Mexican congress of the convention which 'tad been concluded be- tween that government and the UintcdSlates fur the protection of a transit way acrt'BS the iuthimis of anil of the inlcrestn of thone citizens of tho U. Slates who hsd become possessed of the which Mexi- co conferred on (ice of her own eilijtuna in regard to that transit, has thrown The waters of the northern 1'ucific even into the Arctic no, have of Into years been fre- micntetl by our whalemen. Tho of steam to the general purpoitca of iiavigi- lion, is becoming daily more common, tncl itdeeirablo lo obuin fuel andolhor DC. Biipplici at convenient along Iho routo from Iho Asialic io our Pacific shorcn. Our unfortiinnta coiinltymen who from time lo time stiller shipwreck on tho of thu eastern entitled to protection, liesides those objects, ilio (roncihl prosperity of our titHlcs on the Pacific, re- (luircs that an attempt should lie made to op- en thn oppoHJto regions of Asia to a mutual- ly beneficial intorconrte. It its obvious tint the attempt could lio inauc by no power to no (Treat advantage as by thu U. S. whoso con- stitutional system excludes every idea of dis- tant colonial dependencies. 1 have accordingly been led lo order an ap- propriate naval force to Japtin, tinder the command of a discreet mid intelligent ojiiccr of thu highei-t rank now known to our ser- vice, lie is instructed to endeavor to obtain from the nf (hut eorrm relaxation of tho inhospitable and tniFocial system whicli it has pursued for alicnit two centuries. Ho iias been directed particularly to remonstrate in the slronji.'st l.int'iiaire a- "faini-t tho cruel treatmont to winch our and shiri-wreclifd inariiicrs havo been eitbjoc- twl, and to insist that they should treated with lie is instructod, however, at thu tune, lo trivu thai government amplo iissiirancfis that the objects of the li- nked .Statoi; arc tuch on'y I have indicat- ed, and thnt the oxpcditioo ia friendly and peaceful. tho joiiluiisy with which tho (jovcrniiicnia of caniorn Ada nil overtures frotr. I nm not williotit hope of a beneficial rustill of iho nxpedit'on. Shuuld It lie crowned with miriws, tho xvill not. confined to llie U. S.; hut us in Iho ca.-'o of Ubimi, wiil be t.'ijnally unjiiycd by all ntlicr maratiinn powers. F urn inucii (.'ratified in Ktatinjr Ihnt in all propaiaiory lo this liic govern- ment, of the United Ulalns has been malcri- the a serious ol a national object, t am etill i lhal the dliiciiltios on the obstacle in the way very desirable willing lo hop subject which exist, or may hereafter adjusted. the will be amicably tetnion ot ihe home governmoDt, in com- plmnce with what we think the true con-1 struction of the convention, to open all I The subject has, llie attention of senate of the U and requires no further comment m thiucuui- niunication. the other outer buys to our fishermen, was xhe settlement of tho question respecting abandoned in consequence of the opposi. lion of the colonies. Notwithstanding this United Suites lias, since the Bay of bright'eyce and elaeu'e. stop, how cheerl'uCy Wus re-opened to our fishermen in pursued the most liberal course to- wards the colonial fishing interests. they go to work. Our reputation far it, euch girls will make good wivee. Bleasfid, indeed, will shone ineti bu who secure such prizua. Coiitrsst those who do nothing but High all and live to follow Ihe fashions who earn the lirnad that they oat, or the shoes they wear who aro languid and from one weuh'a end to another. Wiio but a simpleton and popinjay would prefer one of i Iho Inner, if he were looking fur a compan- ion. Give us Hie working; o-irls. They are worth ihcir weight in gold. Vim never soe them mincing or have a (i catnip fit" ill the siutii of a npidsr or a mouse. They hav ii-i-U I'.ryai'-'s Tuh'ioco I in Also renfivud (liri-'Cl from Un- xv. I fur yn.'i it iV Co. OIGAU I'OUMAUN grappl WRITB Writo to your sis- ter. Your leltors are u luxury to her tlmt Khe prixes ttimve her je-welry, nmi thcv cost you nothing, or neur it. He at By the revenue law of 1940, the duties on colonial fish entering our ports were very greatly reduced, and by the ware- housing net ii is a uwe'J to be entered in bond without payment of duty. In this way. colonial fish has acquired the mo- nopoly of the trade in our markets, two en- and is entering to some extent into 'nc j tnc nesrotimionB from a desiro to home consumption. These facts were ally aided by iho ollid-s of tho king of i ho Neilicrhinile, ihconly power having any comiiiercul ro'sttions with Japsn. In paBstrjjj from this nirvoy of our foreign rotations, I mvtlo iho uttenlion of congrcii to the condition of that branch of lha gov- ernment lo which this department of public business is Our inturcoursc with fo.rcif.rn powers hap, of laic years greatly in- crcasvd, both in cunfioquonco of our own growth and the introduction of many now stains intu the family of nations. In ihia way Iho department of data has become ovurburtlioncd. It has, by tho recent establishment of a dopnrimcml of the interior, bcon relieved of f-oino portion of domestic ]f the reniftnc of btisincHH of that kind, tho distribution of ul ducuuienti', (be keeping-, pu'iht-hinp, and dislrihutiin; of the uf the If tilled Slates tho CNflciHiun uf Iho copy rijfhl laws; tho subject of reprieves and parij'ins, and some Rica and Nicaiaguu in reijsrd to iheir boun- gubjuclH, relating to interior ailcninis- ......nation, t bun Id be transferred from iho dc- :iU', it would of iho public nervice. 1 will suggest, also that tho build njj ap- propriated to the cute department is not firo proof: lhat thcro in reason to think thero arc defects in its cunKtrtiction, ami that tho archives uf the government in charge of the iho uoil of San Juan do Nicaragua, and conlrovcrBy between tlio rcnublicx o! (Josta d.irv, was coniridereil indispcnsablu to tlio cuninienceniont of Ihe ship canal belwncn i piutmoiit. Iu tha mean lime, the refusal of watered by tributaries of Iho La I'lata, and they gave notice of this purpose lo the U. Statcf, that we might, if we llio't proper, pursue the siiuio cuurec. In compli- ance with this invit-ition. our miniKter at Rio Janeiro, anil our charge d'affaires at JJiiunou beon fully to conclude COIlljlHIC 10 be isppiiod to lli one whenever the st'ji'lt ho purchasoil within tha liuiits at to prices authorized by law, Tho viihiniif furuisrn iiKirchmnilisc imported ilio hist fiscal year was anJ tin) valuij of d.iini'stic productions ex- ported of foruijin incrchamlisa making tho. uf the entire exports oxcl'isivo of thu above there wan exported 8 in spooiu and imported from furuisr" porla In my first unnual tu congress, I called your attention lo what boomed to ma (u be K'jrnu iV'f'icU in the prcseiit tariff and rccummuudcil nucti in my were bent adapted to remedy its and promote tha of tha ireaties with the newly organized coiifudora- country. Noliiinj; has ditico occurrcil to lion, or tho states composing it. The de- lays which have taken place in the formation of the new government, have, us ted the execution of theee instructions, but there is every reason lo hope that these counlrieA will bo eventually opened to out commerce. A treaty of commerce has been concluded between the U. Status am] Iho oriental re- public of Urajrtiay, which will he laid before the senate. Should this convention yo into operation, it will open to ilia commercial en- terprise of our citizens, a country of extent and unsurpassed in natural resources, but from which foreign nations have been almost wholly excluded. The correspond- ence of tbo lale secretary of state with the Peruvian charga d'affaires, relative to llie Lo- bos islands, wae communicated to towards the close of the last icssion, Since that further invculiifKlion.lho doubls which had been entertained of tho title of Peru to islands, hive been removed, and I have deemed it just that the {eroporary wrong that had boon unintentionally duno her from want of information, ahould bo re- paired by an unreserved acknowledgment of her snvcrcii-nty. I huvn the satisfaction uf informing you that Ihe course piiwHOd by Peru, bas been creditable lo tho liberality ol her ffovernment. Before it known by that hsr would acknowledged at my views on impurlanl question. Witlioul rapoalinj; (bo arguments contained in my former message in of ditcrimina- protective I deem it my duty lo call your attention lo ono or two other con- gidnrationti affecting this Tho is tho efluct of larjfe of f.ircigon npun our currency. Most of tho gold uf California f.-ttt a.i il coined, fitnln iis way to Kurope in payment fur pur- chased. In the ncennd placs, raanii- aro broken down by competition with foreicniirc, fho capiUI in- vented in ibem lout, of and aro thrown out of r mplovmcnt, anil tho farm or, that extpiit, deprived of a home market for the ealo of hin nurpKii produce. In the third place, destruclion of our inanufaoliires Iho without competition in our market, and he rainoi Iho price of tlia articlci here far ln ill. increased co.t of iron imported from an.l wealth of .very nalion itinil depend upon it- farmer i. stimulatod to by product., by without loss of time or expcnso talion for manufaclBrw, winch comforl or   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication