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Stevens Point Daily Journal: Thursday, September 10, 1953 - Page 1

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   Stevens Point Daily Journal (Newspaper) - September 10, 1953, Stevens Point, Wisconsin                               Jtomt latte J0imtal FIFTY-EIGHTH YEAR STEVENS POINT, WISCONSIN, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1953 SIXTEEN PAGES GATHERED IN THE MWBY OF the new airport administration building Wednesday were these men concerned with the project: Seated, left to right, Henry W. Lange, civil aeronr.dtics tration architect from Kansas City, Mo.; John Bremmer, Stevens Point, whose firm Installed the plumbing and heating in the building; James L. McCarthy, local airport manager; L C. Herried, Madison, chief engineer for the state aeronautics commission; L. E. Hebal, Fifth ward alder- man and chairman of the common council's airport committee; W. C. Knoepfle, representative of the Chicago regional office of the CAA. Standing, left to right, Gerald G. Krueger, Wiscon- sin Bapids, electrical contractor for the building; W. J. Zutter, a pilot for the state aeronautics commission; Henry Yulga, Stevens Point controller; Ed Sommers, general contractor for the project, and Don E. Arnold, Madison, an inspector for John J. Flad and associates, the Madison architectural and engineering firm which designed the building. ___________________ Inspect Airport, CAA, State Are "Pleased Representatives of the civil aeronautics administration and the state aeronautics commission expressed their approval of the new administration building at the local airport after an inspec- tion tour Wednesday of the building. Representing the CAA were Henry W. Lange, Kansas City, Mo., an architect and W. C. Knoepfle, Chicago, from the Chi- cago regional office. State aeronautics commission representatives here were L C. Herried, Madison, chief engin- eer for the commission, and W. J. Zutter, a pilot for the commis- sion. Zutter piloted the plane which brought the group to the city. L. E. Hebal, Fifth ward alder- man and chairman of the com- mon council's airport committee, Henry Yulga, city controller, and the airport manager, James L. McCarthy, accompanied the in- spectors. Representing those who had worked on the building were Don E. Arnold, an inspector for John J. Flad and Associates, the Madi- son architectural and engineer- ing firm which designed the building; Ed Sommers, Stevens Point contractor who built the structure; John Bremmer, plumb- ing contractor who installed the plumbing hi the building, and Gerald G. Krueger, Wisconsin Rapids electrical contractor who installed lighting fixtures in the structure. Herried complimented the city on the building, saying the "job was well done." and noted that it is an "excellent building." Knoepfle said he was pleasant- ly surprised at what he saw. He took pictures of the building both from the ground and from the air to use when discussing airport buildings with other small cities. Herried and Knoepfle wm re- turn to their home offices and file reports on they saw. Their reports will aUotrfinal payments to be made from CAA and state funds. The building is part of a improvement project at the airport which also includ- ed work on the runways and drives. Of the total, came from the federal government from the state, and 350 from municipal funds. Youths Accused Of Rape To face Court Friday Sheriff Henry H. Duda said this morning that he Is still inves- tigating an alleged rape case for which two youths sre being held in the county Jail and that the pair would not be arraigned be- fore Friday. The youths, one 19 and the oth- er 20. are accused of raping a young woman Saturday in the town of Belmont The woman was treated st St. Michael's hospital after the ind- dent. Royal Mounties Protest Parade Nelson, B. women and 77 men in the Douk- hobor tent village of Polatka were arrested Wednesday night for parading in the nude in pro- test to orders that their children attend public schools. The arrests were made by Roy- at Canadian Mounted Police in the village situated on the out- skirts Perry Siding, 250 miles east of Vancouver, B. The members of a radical wing of the Doukhobor colony were rounded up and put on Canadian Pacific Railways cars for shipment to Vancouver. They offered no resistance but re- mained unclothed during the roundup. All of the 148 persons arrested have been charged with contri- buting to juvenile delinquency. Only a few of the Doukhobor children showed up at school opening time. The radical group has for years opposed regularly consti- tuted authority. They have been a headache to provincial authori- ties ever since coming from Rus- sia early this century. Two Boys Trapped, Die Inside Freezer Desmet, six-year- old boy who was to have started his first day at school and a brother are the latest victims in a nationwide series of tragedies involving home freezers and un- used iceboxes. They suffocated Tuesday night when they climbed into a small home freezer on the front porch of their home near here. The victims were Peter Shep- pard, six, and Robert Sheppard, four. The tragedy brought to 13 the number of similar deaths recent- ly across the country. Within a few days last month five chil- dren died at Marion, Ark.; four at Richmond. Va., and two at Haverhili. Mass. All suffocated hi unused iceboxes. Probers Get Inside Dope On Influence By CHARLES F. BARRETT Washington "The teacher asked the kid was the world round, and he said no. "She asked was it flat and he said no. "She says "'If it is not round or flat, what is "He said, "My daddy says it is crooked.' "I think that is what everybody thinks of the Washington situa tion." With this little aside, Stanley L. Bishop of'S. L. Bishop Associates told a house investigating sub- committee of the trials and troubles of a "manufacturer's rep- resentative" in the capital. A manufacturer's representa tive generally tries to get govern ment business for his client, or help otherwise in relations with the government. The armed services subcommit into alleged "influ ence peddling" in military pur plenty of inside dope on the profession in 254 pages of testimony, released Wednesday. Sounded Nice Bishop told the committee he really didn't have an office and didn't have any associates but he chose that title for his operations because he thought it sounded nice One view of how some people in the business operate was given by Jon Jonkel who himself has been investigated and criticizec by a congressional committee for (See Influence, page 15) Communists Accuse Allies Of Faking List Of Missing Theaters Open Tonight With Reduced Prices The Fox and Lyric theaters, closed since Monday, Aug. 31, will be re-opened this evening, with a new schedule of reduced admission prices in effect, it was announced today by Al Frank, Milwaukee, district supervisor for the Fox Wisconsin Amuse- ment Corp., operator of both show houses. The theaters were closed after three days of demonstrations on Aug. 28, 29 and 30 by scores of teen-agers and a few adults pro- testing a price increase. New Prices The new schedule is as follows: Adult "early from 6 p. m.' until 65 cents; adults from until closing, 85 cents; stu- dents at all times, 40 cents; chil- dren at all times, 20 cents. Frank said that current student admis- sion cards will be honored until a new system of student identi- fication can be devised. Reductions are noted in admis- sion charges in all three categor- ies. Formerly, the adult price was 85 cents at all times, stu- dents were charged 60 cents and children were admitted for 25 cents. Adoption of this schedule was what precipitated the con- troversy which resulted in dark ened theaters. Prices before the recent increase were 80 cents for adults, 50 cents for students and 25 cents The teen age protest was aimed primarily at the higher student rate. Changes Made While the theaters were shut down, workmen were busy with repairing and remodeling in both buildings. New screens have been installed, with the Fox now equipped for the showing o: three dimensional pictures, Frank reported. Painting and refurbish ing has been done inside and out side at both theaters and a her of new seats have been in- stalled at the Lyric to replace some in need of repair. It is likely that the re-opening under the new price schedule has cancelled the need for an eight- member committee recently formed to meet with the manage- ment representatives to explore possible solutions to the contro- versy. "We still are perfectly willing to meet with the said Frank. "If there are other matters that the group wishes to discuss, we will be glad to talk them over." He added, however, that it was his belief that the new price schedule would prove satisfactory to all categories of theater patrons and that norm- al operation of the business could be resumed without in- cident Final Tribute Paid To Chief Justice Vinson Washington The body of :hief Justice Fred M. Vinson was brought to towering Wash- ngton Cathedral today for luneral services in the presence of President Eisenhower and former President Truman. Throngs of ordinary people and dignitaries of the nation as- sembled to pay a final mortal farewell to Vinson. Under Bed Roses Under a blanket of red roses supplied by the supreme court, the mahogany casket was brought from a downtown funeral home to the cathedral on a height overlooking Washing- ton. In the nave of the church, front row seats were reserved for Eisenhower and Truman on opposite sides of the center aisle with places for the supreme court justices and government officials behind the president and members of the Vinson fam ily with Truman. The services brought Eisen hower and Truman together for the first time since Eisenhower's inauguration last January. Vinson died of a heart attack early Tuesday morning. He was 63. Long Service For nearly three decades this friendly man had served his country. As a congressman from Kentucky, as secretary of the treasury and in other high posi tions in the executive branch tt, the government and finally for seven years as chief justice. He wm be-buried-Friday m Louisa, Ky., the little town where he was born, in a cem etery on the bluffs of the Big Sandy river. McCarthy Calls Army To Explain ted Pronananda Washington Senator Mc- Carthy (R-Wis) has demanded that the Pentagon explain, by nightfall if possible, how the ar- my came to rend out to 37 of its commands last year what the senator termed "clearcut Com- munist propaganda." "If you read this and believed t, you would move to McCarthy told reporters, point- ing to photographic copies of 70 >ages of a document he said was jrepared for an indoctrination course for intelligence officers and others. There was no immediate com- ment from the defense depart- ment. A preamble, included in the portions which McCarthy made mblic, said the purpose of the study was "to develop an under- standing of the Soviet people which would be militarily use- :ul in case of war." And it added: The problem is not to demon- strate the political injustice and Advise Sending Money To Beat Indochina Reds By JOHN SCALI national British Prepare To Bury Victims Of Red Gunfire Claim Durkin Quit P. Dur- kin was reported today to have resigned as secretary of labor. The White house declined com- ment on the report but a top offi- cial said an announcement on the subject was expected momen- tarily. The Wisconsin: Partly cloudy with scattered showers west and ex- treme south tonight, and most of state Friday. Little change in temperature. Low tonight 50-58. High Friday 70-75 northwest, 80- 85 southeast. Stevens Point (Furnished by Airport) Yesterday's maximum. 77. Last night's minimum, 59. Noon today. 77. By FRED HAMPSON Hong Kong (.T) This British crown colony prepared today to bury a reserve captain. in its army defense force and five Roy- al navy men killed Wednesday when a Chinese Communist war- ship fired on a Hong Kong naval patrol launch. Five wounded survivors of the attack in the estuary of the Pearl river, were in the Royal navy's Hong Kong hospital under tight secrecy guard. They had been picked up by the destroyer Con- cord after reportedly suffering both bullet and shrapnel wounds. The one identified victim of the fray was E. Frank Gower. an ac- countant with a Hong Kong firm who held a reserve captaincy in the colony defense force. Identities of the other stein have not yet been disclosed but all were believed to be members of the Royal navy. Funeral serv- ices for all six were scheduled to be held Friday. Barred The damaged launch reached Hong Kong this afternoon and was immediately tied up in a closed portion of the navy dock- yard. Newsmen and photogra- phers were barred from the area and the navy issued no statement The tight official secrecy has created speculation that the shoot- ing might have important politi- cal implications, but most mari- time observers said the shooting apparently was unpremeditated and resulted from Communist suspicion of all foreign craft The Reds have opened fire on numerous craft large and small, in the past but Communist shells took by far their heaviest toll this time. In London the admiralty identi- fied the damaged craft as the 72- foot Launch 1323. It was under- stood the craft, which normally carried a crew of two officers and 12 men. was on a normal patrol at the time of the shooting. Presumably the rest of the men aboard the launch were rescued. In International Waters The navy said the clash oc- curred in international waters seven miles southwest of Lin Tin island. This is south of Hong Kong and on the east side of the Pearl river estuary leading to the Communist Chinese port of Can ton. 90 miles upstream. Official details of the incident were lacking. Colony officials maintained a close-mouthed aiti tude. apparently seeking to avoid heightening the already tense re- lations between Hong Kong Red China. In London, the foreign office today called for a full report on the attack. A foreign office spokesman said "we want a clear picture of the incident before do- ing anything about it" security council was reported today to have recommended thai France be given several hundred million more American dollars to back a new drive to end the bloody Indochina war. The American funds would en- able France to transfer nine bat talions of troops from Europe to Indochina to lead a new cam- paign against the Communist-led guerrillas. Highly placed officials who re- ported this council, the said the security government's top jwlicy-making body, decided on this move Wednesday at a review of the Indochina war. Expects Ike's OK President Eisenhower is -ex pected to approve the recommeiv dation after discussing it with kev congressional leaders to de- termine how to scrape up the money. Preliminary estimates indicate the new aid program would cost some 300 to 400 million dollars in addition to the 400 millions congress appropriated for Indo- china this year. The Eisenhower military and foreign policy leaders are report ed convinced the United States has no alternative but to back the new French-Indochina pro- gram if it wants to keep this strategic Southeast Asia nation out of Communist hands. Communist-led rebels, supplied by Red China, already have con quered large areas of Indochina during an eight-year campaign and have tied up more than 350.000 French and Loyal Indo- Chinese troops. Main Part Of Plan The offer to move nine bat talions of French troops to In- dochina to reinforce units alrea dy there is reported to be the strategy. But the French are said t have promised also that they wil try to build up the loyal Vie Nam array further so it. alon; with Cambodian and Laos forces, can eventually take over the burden of defending Indochina To increase popular native support for the Indochina con flict the French governmen also has pledged to grant com plete and lasting independence to the three Indochina states. Start Moving POWs Into Neutral Area By SAM SUMMERLIN Munsan The Communists today accused the allies of faking a list of missing UN soldiers, mistreating war prisoners and kidnaping a Pole who fled a truce super- visory team into American sanctuary. The Reds unloaded this barrage as the Korean armistice moved rapidly into a new phase the disposal of Red and allied ers who refuse to return to their homelands. economic tyranny of the Bolshe- vik government but to illuminate the Russian in his existing habi- tat." McCarthy, in other activities of is senate investigations subcom- mittee, said he had: Summons Witnesses 1. Called two witnesses for closed session questioning-today about what McCarthy term- ed Communist infiltration of ar- my civilian employe ranks. The witnesses' names were'not dis- closed in advance. 2. Ordered an inquiry into the promotion of an army major, noi named, who had been convicted in a case involving "unusual mor- als." McCarthy said he called on the army to name, and produce for questioning, the author of the secret document intended lor use in the training of intelligence officers. The document itself said 100 copies were distributed in January, 1952, mostly in the Far East. (See McCarthy, page 15) The first group of 500 North Koreans moved into the buffer zone under control of Indian troops today. Throw Rocks A spokesman said they threw rocks in rage when they saw two Communist observers standing outside a barbed wire fence. The Communists backed out of range. Neither was hit. The first group of anti- Red Chinese was to be turned over to Indian troops Friday. The angry Red charge of kid- naping the Pole came in a meet- ing of the four-nation truce super- visory commission. Swedish Maj. Gen. Sven Graf- strom, commission chairman, said Communist Poland's delegate ac- cused the Americans of kidnap- Hajdukiewicz. a Polish Interpreter who ducked from his inspection team into American hands as a plane warmed up to take him back to Red Korea Wed- nesday. Threaten Protest Grafstrom said the Polish dele- gate threatened to lodge a strong protest, probably Saturday. The- other Red denunciations were broadcast by Peiping radio, often a weathervane for officia moves to come. Peiping Hed prison ers returned in the exchange just ended have been hospitalized be cause of "physical and mental ton ture at the hands of the Araeri cans." American officials customarily decline comment on such Red broadcasts. In another attack. Peiping said the UN command faked a list oi unrepatriated allied soldiers missing men for whom the UNC demanded an accounting Wednesday. The allied list, which includes 944 Americans, came from van- counted for. ous sources returning prison- ers, letters and even the Reds' own broadcasts. Peiping said the list was in- tended to divert "world public opinion from the fact that a large number of Korean-Chinese POWs who desire repatriation are still being forcibly detained by the Americans." Meanwhile, an incident between an American soldier and a Swe- dish supervisory team officer gave the Reds more propaganda material. Hit By American The officer, identified by the supervisory commission as Capt Elune Larsson of Stockholm, re- portedly was struck by the Ameri- can in a dispute over sending a cable message. Although the UN soldier's name was not disclosed officially, Peip- ing radio identified nun as Pfc. Millard Armstrong, but did not give any hometown. General Grafstrom, supervisory chairman, said he considered the incident closed after a promise by the U. S. army to take disciplin- ary action -rr.a special court tial. however, the Reds termed the incident- "shocking and infuriat- ing" and lodged a protest. Pentagon Sends Notification To Kin Washington -41ft- A faint spark of hope went out from the Pen- tagon today to the next of kin of 944 American servicemen whose whereabouts are unknown since then- reported capture by the Reds'in Korea. The defense department list will be made public beginning Friday, 24 hours after telegrams are dispatched to the relatives of the men missing and unao Polish Interpreter Believes His People Will Revolt Against Reds By ROBERT B. TUCKMAN SeonMffX-A young Polish in- terpreter who bolted from Com- munist control and was given U. S. sanctuary said today his people some day will rise hi re- volt against the Reds "but now is not the time" Jan Hajdukiewicz, 28, told a news conference the Communist rulers of his homeland could not be overthrown "without outside help" even though 99 per cent of the Polish people oppose the Red regime. Hajdukiewicz was a civilian interpreter for Polish members of the neutral nations inspection commission supervising the Ko- rean truce. Yesterday he asked U. S. Col. Harold T. Babb for political asylum as a plane to carry him back to North Korea wanned up at Kangnung air base in east Korea. His request was granted and he was quickly taken to a place of safety. "We had to get that guy out of there in a hell of a said one U. S. officer. Only an hour before the bald- ing young Pole met newsmen in Seoul a Communist official at Panmunjom charged that he had been "kidnaped- by the U. S army. The Polish delegate to the neu- tral nations supervisory commis- sion did not demand the return of Hajdukicwicz but said a strong protest would be lodged. -Lart Ctance' Hajdukiewicz. wearing green U. S. army dungarees, told his news conference he made his "the subjugation of all life." After the news conference Hajdukiewicz was accompanied by U. S. officers to an undis- closed site, presumably in the Seoul area. He probably will be flown to Tokyo in a day or two, but army officials said they had no information on this. State department officials in Washington said the circum- stances were unusual but it is U. S. policy to grant political asylum to persons honestly at odds with communism. Only Temporary The asylum is given on a tem- porary basis, but it can be ex- tended and Hajdukiewicz even- tually could be given opportunity to apply for U. S. citizenship. Hajdukiewicz told newsmen he decided to flee before he arrived in Korea with the Polish delega- tion. Underground At Work "Of course" there is an active underground operating against the Reds. Asked if he thought Poland would help the free world hi the event of war with Russia he re- plied: "I think so, if they are told about it hi advance." He said thert is no food short- age in Poland but everything is expensive. Hajdukiewicz said he received no special instructions before coming to Korea but it was pos- sible other Polish members of the neutral teams were told to spy on the allies. He said he had no idea why he was chosen as an interpreter. "I suppose it was bv chance." he said. "I didn't belong to the Communist party." Hajdukiewicz said the Polish people were permitted to listen I to Voice of America broadcasts He said that when he learned but not to discuss them. He de- he was to return to Panmunjom scribed Voice and Radio Free and then North Korea he acted' Europe broadcasts as "the only immediately because "I knew it true news for us." was my last chance to stay The young Pol? said he was afraid of what might happen to his parents and a sister still in Believe War Near He said the Polish people be- lieve war will break out soon and that the only way they will win liberty is through war. Poland. The UN command went to Asked by newsmen if other invite other Polish and Czech officers to attend the news con- ference but ail refused. Hajdukiewicz told the news ronference he did not believe "I suppose there arc some Red charges that the allies members of the Polish delegation might want to flee from commu- nism and seek U. S- asylum he replied: persons who would like to re- main here. They arc in North Korea. I cairnol say for surf." Speaking of his homeland. Haj- waged germ warfare in Korea and that the Polish people do not believe them. He said lie spent much of his life on a family farm at dramatic break because "1 knew dukiewicz said: it was my last chance." I "Wp cannot say j and attended the university there. He said he believes his escape i cannot discuss anything. He said he worked as a foreign will encourage others in Poland. 'The Polish government is based on he said. "I didn't want to return to my country which has been subjugated by the Communist regime. I should like to go to the United States of He described oonununim M our industry is working onlv for war" against "the free United States of j try in Poland. America, against the correspondent" in the import-ex- port agency of the leather indus- western! Asked what the 1 would do U they got him back. The Communists do not open- ly oppose religion. The war be- tween the Communist regime and religion is underground." he replied calmly: That wfll be very dangerous for me. It is sure that I shall M thrown t JNFW SPA PERI IKWSPAPF3   

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