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   Stevens Point Daily Journal (Newspaper) - October 25, 1939, Stevens Point, Wisconsin                                Phone 2000 teueits itomt latly journal City Edition FORTY-FIFTH YEAR FULL LEASED WIRE SERVICE OF THB ASSOCIATED PRESS STEVENS POINT, WISCONSIN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1939 10 PAGES ADVISORY ELECTION ON WAR URGED Railroads Are Named in Anti-Trust Violation by Murphy MOTOR CARRIERS DISCRIMINATED AGAINST, CHARGE Says Roads Refused to Set Rates on Trucks, etc. Washington, Oct. 25 CrB At- torney General Murphy announced today that he had authorized fil- ing of a complaint charging: viola- tion of the Sherman anti-trust act against the Association of American Railroads, its officers and directors and 236 member railroad companies. The bill of complaint charges, the attorney general said, that the railroads had combined trade by agreeing not to extend to motor carriers the same cooperation in carrying freight and passengers which the roads customarily ex- tended to each other. Refused Set Rates Another allegation was that the Nazi Paper Says Next Move Wiii Be to 'loose a Shower Of Bombs" Over England railroads had jointly refused to establish rail rates on carrying motor trucks, trailers, and truck bodies, "all commodity" rates, con- tainer and similar rates, and had jointly refused to through rates, joint establish rates and fares, and joint billing arrange- ments with motor carriers, in order to eliminate competition. Murphy said the complaint would be filed later today in the district court for the District of Columbia. The announcement was made through 'Thurman Arnold, head of the justice department's anti-trust division. Arnold said that the agree- ment complained of consisted of resolutions adopted by the Railroad association, which includes all maj- or railroads. Aware of Resolutions He added that the department had been aware of the resolutions for some time and that the defend- ants in the action had cooperated "fully" with the department in its investigation. "In view of these Arnold said, "and in view of the fact that a civil suit will adequately present the issues involved, the de- partment believes that a criminal action is inappropriate. "If the court ultimately 'Jeter- mines that the defendants' agree- ment contravenes the anti-trust laws and cancels them, and these remedies should then prove in- sufficient, the ways will still be open for the institution of criminal proceedings, but it is not propo- sed to resort to these unless the civil suit should prove inadequate." He added that if the restraint of trade charged in the complaint was found to exist, that the department believed the suit would restore to individual railroads freedom of action to enter into through trans- portation arrangements with motor carriers. The department, Arnold has no function to promulgate a trans- portation policy for the nation, but that its "sole duty" is to attempt an "emancipation of the railroad from the restraints of these agree- ments." He added: "It is not unreasonable to ex pect that great impetus will b given to the establishment of co ordinated rail-truck service, an that the practical experimentai.ion in this field will develop mor efficient and economical transpor tation channels, thus facilitating the movement of interstate com merce." One Objection The department's announcemen noted that "one large middle western railroad" had refused to subscribe to the A. A. R. agree ments and had successfully estab lished coordinated service with motor carrier whereby it trans ports between Chicago and St. Paul loaded trailers consigned to it by the motor carrier. Agreements entered into by the defendants in the complaint, Arn old's statement continued, forbic such arrangements, as well as other methods of coordination rail-truck service which Arnold said "have proved practicable, efficient and economical in the past and those which future experimentation and invention may prove to be so." Motor vehicles operating in in- terstate commerce have maintain- ed arrangements for through oper- ation similar to that of the rail- roads, Arnold said. The nation's ex- tensive highway system, he added, makes interchange of passengers and property between motor car- riers and the railroads practicable, but the railroads, he said, have sought to prevent this practice by WINNIE JUDD, TRUNK SLAYER IN'33, ESCAPES Flees from Arizona State Hospital, Gov- ernor Reports Phoenix, Ariz., Oct. nie Ruth Judd, trunk slayer of two women companions in 1933, has es- caped from the Arizona state hos- pital Governor Bob Jones disclosed today. Mrs. Judd was sentenced to the gallows for one of the trunk mur- ders but on April 22, 1933, she was adjudged insane, automatically sus- pending the death sentence. She was convicted of slaying Ag- nes Leroi and also was accused of killing Hedvig Samuelson. The slay- ings occurred Oct. 16, 1931, in Phoe- nix. The bodies were dismembered and sent by trunk to Los Angeles. Mrs. Judd was arrested there a week later. Governor Jones dispatched his ex- ecutive secretary, Y. C. White, to the hospital on the eastern outskirts of Phoenix immediately to investi- gate. Border inspection stations, the state highway patrol and peace of- ficers throughout the state were no- tified of the escape. FATHER WAS PASTOR AT DARLINGTON Darlington, Ind., Oct. Mrs. Winnie Ruth Judd, reported today to have escaped from the Ar- izona state hospital at Phoenix is the daughter of the Rev. H. J. Mc- Kinnell, a former pastor here. Mr. McKinnell in 1935 attempted to obtain clemency for his daugh- ter but the plea for a pardon or parole was denied. Mr. and Mrs. McKinnell went to Phoenix to be with their daughter at her trial in 1931. Indicates Hitler Ready to Unleash H is Dogs of War By LOUIS P. LOCHNER Berlin, Oct. 25 Germany's next war move probably will be to loose a shower of bombs on Eng- land, the authoritative newspaper National Seitung of Essen said to- day. This daily is known to be especi- ally close to Field Marshal Her- mann Wilhelm Goering, air minister and No. 2 Nazi. Hence its editorials command special attention. "The moment has come when the war desired by England must rain down upon the British Isle itself, National Zeitung said. Limit to Patience "The patience of a people has lim its. In their doubtless indignation the German people to a man now must turn against the British war inciters in order by a fight which liereafter will bfi relentless, to create :he necessary guaranties for theii security from such irresponsible ma- chination." Meanwhile the high command's communique reported another com- pany of French troops had been driven from German soil on the western front. How many remained was not stated. (The French military commen- tators in Paris said the Nazis yes- terday launched efforts apparently French WAR NEWS AT A GLANCE (By the Associated Press) States told that Germany and Russia are consulting on captured freighter City of Flint. London Air ministry reports night scouting flight over Berlin; Britons concerned by loss of four more merchantships. sporadic fighting flares on western front. and Yugoslavia reported to have promised military aid to Hungary in event of trouble with Russia. POINT GUARDS SCHEDULED FOR MCOYNOU-1 erecting "an artificial through joint action. barrier' FOUND DEAD Chilton, Wis., Oct. Dorschel, 63-year lumber dealer, was old Chilton found dead beside his car on a roadside near Calumetville today. Coroner A. C. Florin said Dorschel died of a heart attack and that apparently he stopped the automobile and stepped out when be felt the at- tack coming. PUNS BEING MADE FOR BIG CONVENTION IN CITY NEXT YEAR Preliminary arrangements for the 1940 state convention of the Broth- erhood of Railroad Trainmen, which will be held in Stevens Point next fall, were made here Tuesday by J. C. Doster, Green Bay, field supervisor and organizer for the organization. The convention, which is expected to attract nearly a thousand mem- bers of the Brotherhood and its auxiliary, was awarded to .Stevens Point at the last convention, which was held in Green Bay. Local committees are being ap- pointed to continue plans. Wisconsin Police Chiefs Open Meeting Milwaukee, Oct. 25 The thirty-second annual convention of the Wisconsin Chiefs of Police as- sociation opened here today with police officials from all sections of the state in attendance. The meeting runs through Thursday. Speakers on today's program in- clude Dr. Herman A. Heise, ex- ponent of the urinalysis test for drunken drivers, and Circuit Judge William F. Shaughncssy. Risen Attending A. R. Risen, Stevens Point police chief, is attending: the Milwaukee convention. Ship Damaged by Heavy Seas at Racine Racine, Wis., Oct 25 The 270-foot collier, Carrollton of Sag- naw, Mich., was delayed here for repairs today after heavy seas ram- med it against the Racine harbor breakwater yesterday while it was attempting to leave port. Strong wind and high waves com- bined to fling the empty coal car- rier against the concrete South Ar- pier, the Impact opening a arge hole in the side of the boat above the water line. The Carrollton was bound for South Chicago and Gary, Ind., to take on a cargo of steel and scrap on. outposts from Germany in tho Warndt forest area.) An assault by German troops west of Voelkingen yesterday, a com- munique disclosed, caused the with- drawal of the French "rear guards" across the border. These "rear guards" were said to have made up the one French com- pany still on German soil as a re- sult of operations on the western front in the first weeks of the war. No Action on Front With the exception of this action, the communique said, there were "no special actions" on the western front. Hans Frank, German minister without portfolio, was designated today governor-general of all Polish territory occupied by Germany but not incorporated in the reich. Frank, a decree published in the government law gazette disclosed, will exercise entire administrative authority over the area and be directly responsible to Fuehrer Hit- ler. Named deputy under Frank was Arthur Seyz-Inquardt, minister without portfolio and former gov- ernor of Austria. They will as- sume their posts after the present military commander in Poland is relieved of administrative powers by Hitler. Since Sept. 30, Frank has been governor of Poznan, a part of Po- land now incorporated in the reich. Can Decree Laws Authority to proclaim -law by de- cree in occupied Polish territory is vested in Frank, the ministerial council for national defense and the director of the four year plan. Existing Polish laws are to remain in effect insofar as they do not con- flict with German laws. Cost of the administration will be borne by the occupied territory. Principal subject of interest in Germany today was Foreign Minis- ter Von Ribbentrop's address to par- ty leaders, which apparently was accepted generally as a signal the war with and Britain is "on in earnest." j Authoritative quarters in Berlin interpreted the address as having "definitely put on end to foreign reports that Germany Is seeking peace under all circumstances." TRIAL SCHEDULED FOR THREE FRIDAY IN GUSTER CASE Going to Camp Firs Week, According to Present Plans Stevens Point national guan units, Battery D and the Head quarters Battery and Combat Train will go to Camp McCoy for a week of field maneuvers from Novembe 4 to 11, according to tentativi mobilization plans announced Brig. Gen. Ralph M. Immell, ailju tant general of Wisconsin. Th plans are subject to the approva of the war department. Immell announced that the. fns week of maneuver's would be from November 4 to 11 and the sccorc from November 11 to 18. These dates, he said, may be altered slightly at the discretion of the war department. All of the units of the nntionn guard will be quartered at Camp McCoy except the 107tb quartermas ter regiment, which will be station- ed at Camp Williams, and the 135th medical regiment, which will op- erate out of the armory at Tomah The first week of maneuvers will see in action the 57th field artillery brigade which includes the two Stevens Point units, the 64th in- fantry brigade, the 107th quarter- master regiment, the 135th medical regiment, the 32nd division tank corps, the 32nd division militaiy police and the Wisconsin contin- gent of the 32nd division headquar- ters. Michigan national guardsmen compose the other units of the 32nd division. The second week of operations will be devoted to cavalry rruneuv- rs with the 53rd brigade headquar- ters and the 105th cavalry regiment taking part. The mobilization of the national guard at this time is in line with orders issued to national p.uard units throughout the United States jy the war department. Trial will be held before Justice Ed Larson on Friday for Ed Pio- trowski, Stockton, Dominick Zblew- ski, Amherst Junction, and Emil Zdroik, Stockton, charged with as- sault and battery In connection with the September 30 dance hall fight at Custer for which several persons previously were fined and sentenced. Ambrose Herek, Sharon, and Ed Hintz, Stockton, pleaded guilty be- fore Justice Larson last Friday to assault and battery charges in con- nection with the same Incident and their sentences were withheld until Friday. All of defendants are at liber- ty on their own recognizance. "MAILING LIST" OF PEACE LEAGUE MADE PUBLIC BY PROBERS Washington, Oct. 25- The Dies committee made public today what it called a "membership and mailing list" of the American League for Peace and Democracy. The list contained names of 563 persons said by the committee to be employes of the federal and District of Columbia governments. The list included the names of Edwin S. Smith, member of the na- tional labor relations board, and Louis Block, member of the mari- time labor board, both with salaries listed as Chairman Dies, (Democrat, Tex- in making public the list, said in a written statement that the committee was not charging that the government employes affiliated with the league are members of the Communist party. He added, how- ever, that "it has been established conclusively that the American League for Peace and Democracy was organized and is controlled by the Communist party." There was no evidence. Dies said, to the effect that the government employes In the league were Com- S, SEEKS FULL INFORMATION ON CITYJF FLINT President Hopes to Re- cover Vessel Seized by Nazis By ANDRUE HERDING Washington, Oct. 25 Full information about German capture of the American freighter City of Flint was sought today before the government takes any formal steps to obtain her release from a Rus- sian Arctic port. President Roosevelt told report- ers late yesterday he hoped to get back the vessel, seized by a Nazi cruiser while carrying contraband to Great Britain. A report from United States Am- bassador Steinharclt in Moscow, he said, explained that all the facts were not yet known there. Mr. Roosevelt added he had no informa- tion as to the whereabouts of the American crew of 42, supplanted by Germans on the trip to Murmansk. Washington officials expected no difficulty from Russia in getting the City of Flint and her crew re- leased. They pointed to three fac- tors in support of their view: 1. Word from Moscow that Rus- sia had interned the German prize crew aboard the freighter. 2. A statement at the same time that the American ship was being detained only temporarily. 3. The willingness with which the Russian government promised Ambassador Stcinhardt. to get ull possible facts from Murmansk port authorities. To Clarify Soviet Ponltlon The case appeared to some offi- cials to be a likely means of clari- fying Russia's position either as a neutral or as a virtual ally of Ger- many in the' European war. The United States contends that a neutral country should not per- mit her ports to be uacd as a re- pository lor ships taken by a bel- Socialite Posts Browder Bond munists. he declared, 'the fact that these government employes are members of a Communist front organization and apparently con- tinued their membership long after this organization was exposed as being Communistic justifies in the opinion of the committee the pub- lication of this list, xxx "The committee has not hesitated to make public the names of private citizens who have been charged with Communist or Fascist activities and we can see no justi- fication for making an exception in the case of the government em- ployes. "In fact, there Is more reason for making public the names of gov- ernment employes than in the case of private citlzeni." Igerent. If Russia permits her ts to be used as a refuge for crman vessels and their prizes which are unable to reach Germany jccnuse of the British blockade, she, in the American view, would be going beyond the limits of neu- .rahty. What would be done here in that in a matter of pure speculu- ion, although it is hot improbable hat Russia would have to be nam- :d in the president's neutrality pro- ilamatlons along with the other Belligerents. This would cut off shipments of war materials to her under the law, and would prevent ships from going to So- iet ports if the neutrality bill be- or the senate is enacted. In any vent, the United States will insist n the release of the City of Flint nd her crew. Russia's position has been a :iat.tcr of much study here, and fficials were not certain what at- itudc to adopt toward her. Russia assured this country of er neutrality when she invaded 'oland. She also gave a genetal- sed assurance of friendship toward Inland in response to a telegram rom Mr. Roosevelt, to Soviet Kalinin, despite the fact hat the United States re.fusted to ccognizc the conquest of Poland y Russia nnd Germany. On the other hand, Russia and ermany joined in a recent demand ,-r. :i.'i consent o peace, and they agreed to con- ult on what measures to take in he event their demand was re- ected. WDA Manager to Speak At Eau Claire Co-op Line Opening Madison, Wis., Oct. A. Becker, general manager of the Wisconsin development authority, and W. W. Clark, associate, direc- tor of the agricultural extension service of the University of Wis- consin, will deliver addresses at Eau Claire November 2 when the Eau Claire electric co-operative will be put into operation. The co-operative, whose presi- dent is Lloyd Anderson, of Strum, has 787 members and 272 miles of line. Work on an 87-mile addition is expected to start soon. The state withdrew its aid from WDA last march aa a result of an act of the legislature. Tho socially prominent Mrs. Hester G. Htmtlngtoii, who ponied security Tree Karl Hrowder after hln Indictment on passport fraud charges, is shown with Kilwnrd Kmitz, Itrowdrr'n attorney. She made, It Hear that she did not know Urowder, general decretory of tho CoinmuniHt party In the UnlOd Stairs, personally. Local Guardsmen Advanced in Rank Promotions of a number of mem- bers of He.'i'lijunrliTH Bitiloiy mid Combnt Train, one of the two Ste- vens Point Natlonnl Gunrrl unit.s, have been itnnnunced. They Jol- low: To seigrunt, Coipoiiila Lloyd A. Cornwell ami John J. to corporal, Pi ivales FilM CInsH Ku- gene P. Urill ami Raymond M. Urbans; to private first clans, Pri- vates William H. Leypr, Roman N. Kurzlnski, William Miller, Wil- liam F. Slehei t mid William L. Winkler. Tho battery, by Cap- tain F. A. of thiee officers and '12 enlintod men. In tho latter group mo one fhM sergeant, two .stuff sergeants, sergeants, five corporals, nine pri- vates first rlfiHs and priv.iles. Non-commissioned officeis and pri- vates first, flnss outnumber !hu pri- vates, 23 lo 19. Two Men Killed In Auto Accident Manitowoc, Win., Oct. Adolph Otto, 55, town of Liberty farmer. Otto, and an unidentified man about 25 or 30 years old were killed last night In an automobile acci- dent on Highway 141 seven miles south of here. Otto's car, apparently being driv- en by the unidentified man, went into a ditch, was steered back on- to the highway and then went into a ditch on the other side and fin- ally crashed into a barn. The machine was wrecked. Otto formerly was chairman of the'town of Liberty. STATE NYA CENTERS OPEN FOR SEASON; 28 ENROLLED HERE Twenty-eight aie enrolled nt the Stevens Point NYA eo-operntivo center, one of operated in Wis- consin by the NYA. Others are lo- cated nt Supetior, Mire Lake, Me- nomonle, J'inirlO du Chien, 1'laltc- villc, Antigo, Wfiiwa.ii, Kncine, Sbe- boygan, Rhmelandcr, Mar incite arid Milwaukee. The centers, some of which arc entering their' third year of operation, have, a total em-oil- men t of 375. All of, the cenlrrs are for boys, except those at Stevens Point and Ricfi Lake, which are for girlH Home economics, clerical work and nursery school training are courses offered at the. girls' centers, while the boys' courses include such sub- jects as plant arid animal husband- ry, farm mechanics and marketing, automobile mechanics, salesman- ship, bookkeeping, typing, forestry and metal working. At each of the centers civic work projects are carried out, providing the boys and girls with employ- ment for which they receive per month. From thin they pay their share of the center's rent, light, heat, food and housekeeping costs. Each person's share per month gen- erally is about The 14th center In the. state will open next week at LaCrosse with a registration of 35 boys, according to John H. state adminis- trator of the NYA. NOVEMBER 27TH DATE SET FOR BROWDEITS TRIAL Blames Republicans for Federal Grand Jury Action New York, Ort. 25 -Trlnl Communist Karl Brnwder, charged with obtaining a passport through falsi) representations, 1ms been set for November Tho head of the Communist party In this country appeared nervous yesterday on hln icleu.su from a federal detention cell after bond of had been posted by Mrs. Hester G. Huntlngton. Mrs. Iluntlngtnri, society woman and sister-in -law of Robert Minor, a Communist lender, said shfi furnished bull "as a matter of principle." Rppomling If) a Hiibpoenn, she testified lal'T In Hip day before the federal xinrid Jiuy that indicted Hrowdei in ils inquiiy into the rc- poited operation of a "pfisspoit mill" supply i rig faki; American traveling cdcnlialx to Communist agents and fumgu .spies. Jirowdcr blamed Republican party national cornrniltoo "interven- .surrender of now deal liberals to reactionaries of the "Martin Dies and imperialist war mong- ers for IIIH pi execution. Declaring the action against him was "obviously a pait and product of. tho manufactured war Browdor said: "The legal absurdity of the pro- ceedings is revealed by the fact that even the reactionary Hoover regime, which had this alleged case when it was fresh ten years ago, decided there wore no grounds for prosecution. Now it is warmed over, so that it appears my so-called crime con- sists of traveling under my own name. Even traveling under any as- sumed name, which I have not done in many year's, is a custom of the highest American social circles, and one could imagine the con- sternation in high society, if it should be established as a crime. No Body Found in Newly Dug Grave Juneau, Wis., Oct. iff Harold Hammer, after investiga- ting what appeared to be a newly dug grave on a farm in Theresa township, reported today he had found no sign of a body but that there a bundle of clothing in the crotch of a nearby tree. Ap- parently the clothes were those of a 'teen-aged girl. Hammer said no girl in the Theresa area had been reported missing. THE WEATHER Doudy tonight and Thursday with oecjisloiml light rain Thursday; somewhat cooler Thursday and in went tonight. Highest and lowest tempera- tures reported in the last 24 nt official weather sta- Wichita 90, Helena, Mont., 12. Point Furnished by Postofflce maximum, 48. night's minimum, 41. today, 48. Precipitation, only trace. AMENDMENT TO REPEALER ASKED BY LA FOLLETTE Neutrality Measure Rushed Along to Fin- al Vote in Senate Washington. Oct. senate rejected today an amendment designed to limit the president's discretion In In- voking: the administration's pro- posed neutrality legislation. A proposal hy Senator John- son, Democrat, Colorado, to strike discretionary language from the measure was defeated, 61 to 26. In effect, Johnson asked that once the president found that a state of war existed ho would have to proclaim Invocation of the law. An the bill now stands invoca- tion of the law is merely auth- orized. By the vote the senate ap- proved retention of thin provi- sion which Johnson said would permit the president to decline to Invoke the act, despite the outbreak of a foreign war. Washington, Oct. La Follette, Progressive, Wisconsin, proposed today that the administra- tion's bill to repeal the arms embar- go be amended to require that a national advisory election be held before congress could declare an overseas war. His proposal came as the senate's rush toward a finnl vote on the neu- trality revision legislation bogged down in a fresh flow of speech- making. Leaders of both sides in Ihc firms embargo controversy Bald the final ballot was unlikely before tomorrow or Friday. Would Only ho Advisory La Follette, an opponent of em- bnrgo repeal, described tho suggest- ed election aa purely advisory and not binding on congress. Ho told newsmen the only case In which such an advisory lest of pub- lic sentiment would not be required would bo In the event of a threat- ened attack on this country or by non-American country on any na- Lion in this hemisphere. At the last session of congress, La Follette was joined by ten other senators in unsuccessfully propos- ing a constitutional amendment which would require similar refer- enda and make them binding. The proposed constitutional amendment was similar to one pre- viously introduced by Representa- tive Ludlow, Democrat, Indiana, fh was opposed by the adminis- .ration and rejected by tho house. Of fern ZZ Amendments Senator Lucas, Democrat, Illinois, ilso introduced 22 new amendments o the neutrality revision bill which 10 said were mostly "perfunctory md perfecting." He told reporters he legislation was so important hat every precaution should be tak- n. The new speech-making upset cal- lulations for a quick vote. Alt hough expressing' hope the IOUHO would uphold the embargo, Senator Nyo, Republican, North Dnkota, agreed with Democratic Leader Baikley that the senate's decision would come late this af- lernoon or tomorrow, imd added thfit repeal would get from 55 to 60 votes. As the vote approached, Senator Bornh, Republican, Idaho, co-lead- er of the opposition, told leporters: Sees I'oints in Cash Carry "If they aic going to pass a bill based on the principle of this mea- and is about as good a bill as they can write. But of course that is not to be con- sidered as the principle I have stood for. Cash and carry is just as unneutral as repeal of the arms embargo." A decision by Senator Vanden- berg. Republican, Michigan, not to offer an amendment to embargo only "offensive" weapons eliminated one possibility of lengthy debate. This proposal had been advanced by former President Hoover and Col. Charles A. Lindbergh, but Van- denberg explained that no one- couid be found to distinguish clearly be- tween offensive and defensive weapons. Called Early His announcement came after Barkley had called the senate to meet an hour early fat 10 a. m. Both sides had agreed yes- terday to curtail debate, and Vice- President Garner, in one of the most talkative moods since he be- gan presiding over the chamber, had told senators he would stand for no slow "horse and buggy" action in offering amendments. It was Garner's fast-moving gavel and quick parliamentary tongue that helped the senate adopt 10 and reject three amendments yesterday after slightly more than three weeks of general debate had ended. He denied, however, that he was "railroading" the bill, which he supports. Cftuuifm Made Under changes in the "cash and carry" sections approved yesterday, American vessels could transport no arms anywhere. Such shipments to belligerents would have to go in foreign vessels and would havo to be paid for and title transferred (Continued on   

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