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River Falls Journal Newspaper Archive: May 23, 1860 - Page 1

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   River Falls Journal (Newspaper) - May 23, 1860, River Falls, Wisconsin                               VOLUME ill. RIVER FALLS, PIERCE COUNTY, WISCONSIN, WEDNESDAY. MAY, 23, 1860. NDMBEB VTEKKLY UY 3L- -A.. AVU Rvrisor Sco Fonrth Page. LET ME KISS HIM FOB HIS MOTH- ER. (.A TOUIIJ; ti.nii who lini) left liii liowo in Mnuip. ruilily :iinl vigoroux, was iMfei-d with Mcr in Xi-w Orliani.nml though nur- with dcvotitl care In- fnvnilly tlicd. When cloned H.IH! nnngcil noiii.ui, "li-tnii- L< 1 mi- liim lor liii inntln-r 1 lire lav him tin- j'.ir anav fnini hump. anothrr Sure mny Infn in lior Ui il lijis would him, Till lur huirt uuiiM nearly brvnk in to I'liim'ulio'll him J-tt mi' Mm fur licr l.i i Oum IIJM iiiiitlifr, t n." tin- wiiiKlirihi; Iniy It nir.r it mi nlhT l. i of Hoirou' i iijinn liir until. him his mother I dm '1 ill Hit foul lulu I ion r.K.ilhiii; in (hi J.  him fur tnotlii r ami inj; iindnr nor In srilullicl, Ut-iiiN- n alnni, wliili' ye rtaJ. 'll.iul. ih. linmaii, y mj; lum lufihtll LI I'hri-tian woman LILLY S GRAVE. ni iiilt il. l.i' Imi j.l.m j J. ll'tttlM'V 'J Incc. 'I. li Jr.! JH it. Kin .1 i-Mtil tnii-la p'ltlu i-nii i.rliiuft angrls i... iii-.llll lii.'il Ill'illnil, 'or J.illi' f- l Cmr :UK! 'in r] mr II .ml "it ii'I. r. H.I 1--1. A u J H'l )kr w n v wJ mi >lw llnwv. loo jmn- for car'.li, Ami hi till Sin- with us n .WiOmlt hums, Tlirn wliiffcil r (liglif U> hvmvn. COMPOSITION KOR i Ona. 'i uo Tho rose is tho protest aii'J most of all flowers. Altho' a little out of fashion, it is very nice; it is Mtvct, pretty, nnd O, so sweet. Tho rose bus all speaking of love. Jt is to nice to converse with flow- I do Jove it so much. The rose in (LeunrJy winds of Juno. Tho of Hows tho roso nwiyr. 'J line i iiie ofthoso old ones which very nise jicoplu now tliink so fuiMi-li: that 'Mother Gooso's Moio- niid, 'Cock and '.luck o' the -Jack ihu Giant Kill- cr.'imd -Citi'loiolla.'aiid 'Ooauty nnd tho Bonn." Mid t'lible, with the and Children's and the 'Tiensuiy of Choice Old Fain and the 'Story of Poor Joseph, and and 'Sinbnd tho were n library for little folks which none of the who modern hooks cou'd nifiko up fur (Iicwmil of; nnd I was tosoolhwn their books; though sunn- of tho now books wera indeed ns and for them us any thing tlmt could bo imagined; such as (Vndcison'f and 'Master- man Ready.' and the Settlers in mid 'Sir Jvlward S'Jw.trd's nnd that oxqitiiito litllo book, (A' Tivp to Catch a and other cqtnil'y Ii stories by tho snino hand, nnd iho'Huy the 'Minister- ir.y C'lnK.'reti, and some others that J coiii'J nn'I 1 was glnd to see thorn nmoiig to-day; only this they must remember, ihnt ''to more they read such books na the Insc f.wo, J'w more dead thtir would 5'id the hauler thc'r heart1-, if they did not try or or pioud, or selfish and self- willed, or iclio and uu-itracij.) but (fod did not think nny tho worse of thorn on that nccconnt, provided they honestly tii- ed to bo good indeed, tho harder they found it, the more was pleased with lliem, if only they tried the more earnest- ly and thoy must not bo (discoimig-d, or afiaid of God, if they should sometimes stumble and fail into wiong, (ns most like- ly Ihoy but bo soiry, and on slnvinjj to do light, and bo sine thu, God would then them just a? tender- ly, nnd foigivo thorn, and nmlco allow- ance for them, just ns loting fathers and mothers ays do, and they uould cer- Ininly 8UCCCOO at last, tor God's good spir- it was in all thair hejiits to holp'overy one to become good that honestly and kept on trying. "Hut how good God K At liist thought it would .seem one of the mom n- fulloH things in tho vvoild that 'thu littlo folks should bedopiived of tho sweet in- fluence of right instruction; tho blessed scuso thnt they aro God's dearly loved childron, and subjected to such teaching as Mr. Gum's; mado to think themselves tho childron of tho Evil Olio, nnd sure to fjill into his clntchoi nt tho Inst, unless they happen to bo among the elect, which it is ton to ono thfy woienot. Ono would think their young uould ba ovcnhadowed and chilled to its very cen- tre, by groat black horror of such a ciecd. But Hod lakes care it shall not bo so. If you chance tocorao tipou n (roop of those little ones oct of doors at school iccoss, jcu uill ihom running, and scampering, and kicking up their hcols liko young colts let loose, nnd filling iho air with tho mciry ling of their shouts and laughter. A stianga spectacle nnd R fiiglitful one in a tight logical consid- eration of the thoy nro' taught to see tho doomed littlo wretches nud thoughtless thotorific chances of thair fato iSiit God, the trno loi ing God, is stroiigoi- in bia henrts than tlx-i" Catechism, selling foith a God wise than all tho difl'orcnce bolween a bud one and nono. Let us rojoico it is so. Let us bo thnt sneh wholcioinoiiistitictions enter so little into the iiic-ciiculation of children's heaits, b.il oil ofr', for the iTiost pniC, liko ilio littla pollois of hail fiom tho uindows, iiny.ndhcsioii at all.' "35ut, husband, flo you tint tho [inrcnta and oldois icnl'y hold any ril 1 they th'nk thoy do; some of them only think they do, but in tciihty not; they hold only t'tc words: "-omo f hold (ho ductiincs but ivuhout or htlicunp. in tlio coiisi'fjucnces. TJIOI7GJUT. will be reported. All things i have golton something from it; some- thing good tind quickening to true iotis fooling in thoir hearts. But tb'n, God bo thankod, neither the childien are es-gagod in rejortW their own hislo- no, for lie u.o.l p.ut, ihoir panmta UM- Tho and tho nUciKt tho Cntecbisio; so the hnrm l was small; lather in the good thoy did not got than in the hai in thoy did. 9B9E MJKE Vl'AIXII THE BAT-TAITj C'ACTt'S. IVHIXIXti. .lioy "JJut (as I said) there were compensa- tions for little people. For tho younger ones the primer, which contain- ed tho catechism, contained many tlrngi ed by tl.oir own shadows. The rock leaves its scratches on tho mountain side, tho river its channel in tbo soil, tho nnitnnl leaves its a in the strat'im, tho fern nnd tho leaf thoir modest epitaph in the things llint young and henltlfy conl- >Jllc falling drop makes its wspul- iniuds could contrive to grow ehor in the snnd or atono; not a footstep Thero wn, that wondciftil alphabet with jn the Jmw or along thu ground but prints its pictures n.) 1 couplet of tunes to end, 5 nloro or )ocs ,Mting a mnp letter, of winch I remember nothing hud but tho opening: 'In Adam's Fall, We sinned nil. 'This might have done i of ils match; every flcl of man inscribes itself on the memories of its fellows, and in his own faco Tho air is full of sound the children tbo sky of tokens; tho ground is all inom- upon men. harm if they nn.lcistood (.olicvcJ, or tried to believo tho meaning it was fram- ed to convey, orat least it mighl perplexed and troubled ihoir yoxng thoughts. But I don't think they got nny insight of thnt meaning, nnd so no harm; nor would thoy, I think if the coup- let had been luinod mlo a by adc'ing, might with equal truth be added: In Cain liis sinned fin tlier. ''There too was tho moving ballad of Iho bunting of. John Rogers, and the btil! moio moving pictures of his vtifo and nino small children mound him nt tho stake; thochiidien's heads going down just liko tho stops of stairs from "biggest to least, except the )ittle.st ono that can tad at tho mothei's bionst. Other things thero wcie too in thnt piimei which (without nny purpose or cons-cious- neas, jou may ba soroon the part of its makois) had tho genial effect of good fiction on tho childish mind nnd heiit. "Then, too, the children, both young- i Bieteb and older, hnd tho inngo of tho Bible, pcihaps tho gioal Family ]5iblo, contain- ing somelimei, most lemnrknble wood- cuts or mid oien pcilinps tha n maucllous mld-'lion lo their nlthouriu some of them oraudn signatures, nnd every object is cov- cied hints which speak to the intelligent.' SEHMOIV. Wo find the following excellent homily oil Honesty in an exdinngo: "All tiue in hfo must bo bnsed honest dealing with oin fellow nil need friendship, nnd I There is n class of in this world in i .11 by no menus whose prominent Thev whine lm- c.ulsc they nro ,h wbmQ bccnUQO another blessed were not allowed to read it on liic Snb- i.'ttli. Tlie Bible! full of etoiies, nlliioi- 'iii'l Ink'sfo chiklion. some oi them in- not ic> suiliiblo niul olnM- sympathy. Lifo without these, is miseiy indeed. A mnn in any neighborhood known to be devoid of common honesty is slimmed as nn cnomy to his rr.co and nn outcast ft om respectable society. Liko a freobootci of the sens, is n hiss and ftbywoid in cvoiy well-oidoiod community. Honest men look upon him a putrescence on the bofly His countonanco betokens .1 The frowns of Ho.iv. en icst upon him. His doom is to suff- er lemorsa and slmme, O How PEOPLE CUEATK WHAT TIIEV SEF. XAIUUI: Four men s'isited Xi- ayiiri Falls, Olio pionchcr of tho moie luiio At tho foot of tho oupitol gardens Pennsylvania avenue fan the r ght hand i side as you aie fiont.ng that building.) is nn inclosed containing one or more tenements and I some conservatories mid I becnus j some f, icn.ls have died aud Here for some yems past and until his ihcy whine enjoying L'nclo Sam's pntronige, sojourned a Fienchnmn, learned in bot- rny and many other sciences. Some companions, while passing those were vaunting his acquiiomuiits to Miko, who, from a spirit of contradiction, called them in quaslion. lie doubled whether eminent botanis's knew ll e dill'urenco between oats and wheat, nnd belicveJ, hi snid, Ihnt n Howery boy could persuade them that corn clover. Finally, Miko mideitook, to deceive tho Frenchman with whatever he could pickup where they stood, in tho lane skirting his promises. From a wreck of flower pots nnd rubish, ho selected one sound pot and a dead rallying next tho heap. Placeing the rnt in the flower pot ho covered it up wilh mold, leaving out tho tnil, which he fixed perpendicularly by tying it carefully lo a small -vieen stick which happened lobe 'convenient'among tho garden rubbish. Ho called on the professor, and told him Ihnt n friend, ship having touched at ono of tho islands of the then terra ineoy- nita Japan, had seme interest) hnd presented him with a very cuiious kind of This ho wished tho pro- fessor to examine. No one, Miko snid, had been able to make it out, nnd he might have it for ten years and not find people who wou'd; so he hardly felt justified in keeping it out of a public col- lection and yet he did not like to part with a keeps'ike from ft 'friend.' The professor eagerly repniicd to examine the Then, Hauler the r hearts it they did not try ;u tho other Miss Yon spmo way, according to their opporl'uni- befl'Uiful tala of 'Heart's Ease'5 tics lo imitate the good oxnmplcs which jooking ovor tho now: touched their (ondor so deeply; por. and to tho rest, they must have noth ing to do with such books ns 'Professor Savothonglit's Truth Hi ought his nnd 'Gront Thingn Made Small nor with Mr. Silloy'.s series: tho 'Child's Book of of 'Natural and tbo rest; nor with Softly's Oiilrluh nor'Jfrs. Seinom'i Awfulncss of lufnnt nor Miss Sharp's Profitableness oi' Pioty, tho wisdom of serving Gcd be- cmtso He pays bettor than tho Kvil Ono; that they must never look into Ihose books; and, in fino, they must speak the truth, obey parents, lovo their broth- ers nnd bo kind to every body, ny their pvayors. and remember always that God's children and not tho dovii'u tunt God lovod to tea Iovcd fnir> to linvo them hswrf a PIoocl timo na often ns they coulu get it, provided they did not neglect miy or thing wrong; 'tlmt tlioy should try to do right becnuse it was right, anc! notmeioly for any thing they might hope to by it, whether from God or from otters; and never to do wrong bocmis'o it wrong, ineiqly from ftnf nf what might come of it oitbor or nftor that the good Lord lovad denrly, and Jiad not a thought or wish about them, but to have them good, and happy haro and forever, and tbay'should therefore live as His dear childron, and try'to plcnse Him out of love; llut thfiy could not bo good without His any, more tlmn they could lift tbcmselyoi the in n that some- limci hard to bo good, harder forborne than for others because their was not ni fatornblo, (some being' naturally wcire prone than others to 'angry1 ort out of patience, or to bo itiHen or wondcil'nl influence: it ono of Gud'i thcincots'stciicy thcioisbo- ATOen a mother's head and u ro thci'j heart, between n father's crcud and a fnther's loie: and so through God's ovoin them and ihoir patent's lovo sin- rounding them, the littlo ones get a chance tor n joyous childhood, unless in ho midst of very unhappy otitwnrd cir- cumstances. Oh! when will all thoso 'iiondlj-3 I never think of tho social it'a of highly c'vilixcd nations, with so much sorrow for its ciils in nny of its other iclalionM, as in its bearing upon the unfolding of childhood.' K x ft 'Mis. Oldlinm hnd been sitliog for >ome time in silence, her s-eN-sois bu-ily tinning in and out tho indented edge of a collar she was trimming for Lilly. Fied and bis sister vvoio on tho other side of ho table, cnch absorbed in leading, the no tho other Miss The nowspa- Mrs. Oldhnm at length cn-sting her eyes upon tuJ> chi.Mron, 'how dirt'eront tno ibeling aiuono; people now from what if used lo bo about nov- ols and works of fiction.' "Yes.' replied tho Doctor, Uhoy did not understand, in tho days of your grandmother, thnt it is through tho world of fiction children first enlor into tha di- vino and eternal world.' "Dear me! husband, I afraid I don't understand icturned his wife. "I bog your pindon, rny dear; I was nbsunlly transcendental in plnnso. I moan thnt it is from true fiction, from the living products of tho creative imagina- tion, children got thoir first ideas of tho wonderful, of a world out of nature, 'tbo kipornntural and'divine. True nnd pure fiction is the pit rest truth, tho natural 'and necessary aliment for tho young imagin- ation, througk the quickening of which faculty alone the other faculties 'of nriind nnd heart aro best unfolded, oven if they "can be nt all unfolded in any other way.' '''.4, sad litno then, in those old 'days for tho unfolding of the young mind and said Mrs. Oldham; 'almost a hope- less case.' "So ono would any at first replied tho Doctor; 'but God watches over the'littlo'ones. He'contrives com- pensations and protections' 'where they concerned. Ho' does not let mon- strous doctrines nnd pious absurdities of -projiidico altogether 'prevail -ovor' com- mon-sense and tho impulses of love in parents' "In thoso days children were indeed mnde to'study 'the Caio- cb'im' for'their Sunday (or a? they called ren ns 'Robinson Crusoe' other nov- els might (in I tit vorv inanv of thorn of such biiuity and intou'st ns no uthci book cnn tho sto'ies of of Ruth; of little Samuel; or Guliilli; of Daniel; ofJo-iali: nnil thoso pniabksof our J.cnd, llie -Good and tho :l shocking of wnler-powor. Ar uhHhmnko.httlc peoples eye, Illl up tho poet. nil run with sviupnthetio so much do they quicken tho fatuity and touch the hcsut. foi thoic was the nousctiitc of Olotlicr Goose's Mo- which iho good Loiil (I 0.111110! .1 type of theology, tlio second c After n close in- bnl llimk) look special care, hold on Iho instincts of mother that no black doctrines of picl< and and no puiitnnical sourness sanctimony should dcpvh a t'io little ones of; nnd as they grow bigger, thoie wero with thoso wumler- fnl wood-cuts in the spelling-books, vvhuro wcio sloiiesloo, such aslho'-tory oiPoor Joseph (who had 'o many childron lo feed nnd so little to frcd Ihem with) nnd his littlo boy, who thought he would nol ent his shnio of tho blond, bit dio nnd   a geologist. What ynir I'lipiession of it? was asked the man. "I could only think of God's wr.-'lh." And what was Mr. Ut litarian? tlinunlit it tVnd poet, "tt seemed as if a million wat-horses were invhing down n piocipicc, and with flow. Jiinnoi.'1 And what wnsyouis, Mr. (faologlst? '-I i.-.lctil.i- ted how fnsi rotk wearing lloniti j it noiild 1-ike the oataiact j to up to Buffalo." it Sabbath) losaons. inach bottar" Sunday Veadinff'for' they would really drawn many n tear from other stones, more than 1 can mention; all of them novels and tales and romances to the young. Besides this, arid it seems to bnva baen n special 'dispensation of Providence' in favoi of the young, it al- most always happened, in some mvhteri- ous way, by nobody's procurement in pnr.'Oulnr, there went circulating through ever neighborhood, Btrny copies of 'Cm- UordJ'n, or the Glass 'Beauty and the 'Transformation of Indus' 'Aladdin's WoTldoiAil and 'Sin- bad's which somehow tho pious fathers and mother ikiled to see belonged to tho class of books prohibited; and so tho little ones got thoso ideas of the derful and supernatural which, entering tho childish mind through the imnpina- tion, in tho garb of fiction, prop.iro it for divine eternal truths. Then too, God be thanked, there wero bnt few childron, in New-England nt least, that did not in snrno way, through His liok! of 'Robinson tbe most fas- cinating of human books to childien at a proper ngo; of tbo rending whereof ob- seivant poisons would find proof la num- berless islands, notsrirronnded by wator whore" shipwrecked littlo people built Inits and played at 'Crusoe' and his 'man iB'riday'.with great daliglit, while their miuds unfolded and grew in the joyous activity of their play. CHARITY. Charilj ombiawB theuido tiicjo of ni! poss.t'lo Itindncss. Kveiy good set is chniitj smiling in youi biother's hico is chanty; your fellow man to an oxbortion to dio Is is, equal to iong; your putting a in tho right road ischauty ;your assisting tho blind is charity; your moving stones and thorns from tha rond is charity youi .giving water to tho thirsty is A man's good wealth hereafter is the good ho docs in this world to his fellow man. When ho dies, people will say, 'VVhat properly hns ho left behind him Hut tho angels will ask, 'What good deeds has he sent before him' There is a gontloman in Glasgow, Scot- land, so polite that lie begs his own pardon every time ho tumbles down.----- Being good-natured, he always grants it. spoction he determined vth.ilit was, oral least christened it bv n fino fiu'ck name two words, Mike six- teen Tho professor exhausted himself in persuading Miko thnt tho in- lercsls science i requited thnt ho should sacrifice to them tho sentiments of friend- ship, by surrendering this rare production of tho vegetable kingdom to the keeping of thu botanist. Thu reluctant Miko ev- entually consented, on ih willing nnd solemn nssnranuo of the piofuvsor that it nould 1 o teiulo I t'l the utmost j and so it in a hot-home, it c u i y ut caieful'y bespii ikkd with ntn icinpci'iiuiu of seventy degrees by the thei mometer. as not- iced and dcscnliod in tho National Inli-1- ligencer. 'J'henolicQ was copied into oth- er papois. Tho pU.nt was exhibited with, prldotoajvei.il eminent nt length, with tho hcnt nnd moiituic, iho tip of tho (nil began to excoriate. Tho they have aches and pains'; thoy vtlim-', no ono can lei! why. Now, 1 would like lo say n word to these whining poi- sons. Stop whining. It is of no tbn everlasting complaining, fretting, scold- ing, faulting, fan'it-finding and whin- ing. Why, you are the most deluded ?ul of creatures that ovor lived. Did yeu not know that it is a well settled principle of physiology nnd common sunsc that those habits nro more exhaustive of ner- vous vitality thnn almost any 'otlior viola- tion law? Ami not know that life pretty much as you taka it and make it You can make it bright, you can tnako it dark, shadowy. TliH life is meant only to fit us for ft higher and purer stale of being. Then stop whining and fretting, and 'goon jour way rejoic- ing.' You are inlseiublo, nervous, dvspcptic, in wrong relation to yourself nnd nil God'a universe, nnd that's all that ails Then stop short, take up tho song of life and leave oft' forever that whine ot donth! 'A merry heart doeth good like n mod- icine; but a broken spirit drieth up tho bones.' 'Live simply, cheerfully, trust- ingly, and by-nnd-by your iroubles' 'will take lo themselves wings and fly You will gradually grow mitre-mid more into harmony with the'natural order of things, nnd tho bright light ol heaven will shine pleasantly dotvii into souls life. nnd them into tiuw DOMESTIC AECE99ITY. Every house should as nn i lil II f VFl L11U1I f r "So itmay bo seen what -propidenccs papa say and what compensations there weio for childfan'in those days story-books were A minister's wife first time I took my oldest boy to churchi when ho was two ycais and a half old, I managed, with and frowns nnd candy, lo keep him very still till the ser- mon was half dono, this time his paticncs'v.ns exhausted, and ho climbed tohiajfeel, and stood.on the seal looking nttbo preacher (his intently. Then, ns if ho hnd hit upon a certain' 10- iief for his troubles, he pulled mo by the chin tor.ttrnct my attention, end exclaim' eft'in a distinct voice, 'Msronia, f aw, and good people's thoughts restiic- tive and auslero." I old spcnbing of the different 'allotments of men, by which somo become useful, ci tizens, and ethers worthlen vagrants, byway of illustration, romarltir, slab of comes A aaeful doorstep, i whilo 'another becomes a ly ing't'omVkono.. BE just ami1 fear not, A lawyer engaged inn case, tormen- ted n witness so much with questions, .that tho poor fellow at last cried for water. said the judge, 'I, thought you'd pump'him dry.' What wind should .a hungry sailor wish that blows' fowl and chops about. 'Come eut of the u th' shark ssid, wteu swallowed tie tailor. professor was THIS budding. It examined with giant intcro-.t by of the chief pitKnis, Ihegicnt Daniel, to xilunn tho botanist promised ono o''tho first slips foi Maiahllold. 'It was too good joko to said Mike, 'especially in n hot-house, so bofoio long linn n rnt.' The wrnlh nnd shame of iho pro- fessor were excessive, nnd so u as ihe iu- dignalion of iho grest Daniel, not at Ihc author of the joko, but at thounfoitunate botanist, he stigmatu'Vl ar, .1 frog-eating Frenchman, through whom ho hnd been Inkon in, nnd who ought to have known better.' mute, n good natured, tidy, old lady. This important fixture should al- ways be, if poss'blc, a grand-mother, or as next best, an aunt; so indispcnM- ble to tbo rcspoctnbility, comfort and con- of n well iogiilatc.1 household is ttioold ladj, that if this system of housa- keeping become it wiil beconxi J quite satuinl to Rnd, under tbo head bt' in uewsp'ipe.s, for prop- er tl J Indies lo supply the lack oi'dvar old fo'ks gone to the belter home, Indeed, O'd ladies, discovering themselves in de- mand, would keep in tnu.-b longer, nor begin 10 miko winding shevU and grave caps full ten jears before I'KO great reaper come lo gather in ihc shocks of corn fully ripe. Old ladies are vanled. Providence designed svcli to fill n larto space in the domestic re- maikablens living not for tlicniselics hut for most j of diaintcreiitod this sido of- on. RK.1 L'TIFl TAT.K. Nobody abuses small talk unlc% ho bo slranger to its convenience. Small talk- is tho small change ofh'fo; thoro is no gel- ting on without it. There are times when 'tis folly to be when gravity and sodateness ought to be down stairs. A philosopher cuts poor figure in a ball room, unless he loaves his pljij- o lOphy at home. Metaphysics aro instru- "nionUin the midsl of agrceablo prattle, a death's head on n festal Board. have met -with men who wero too lofty for small talk--who nould nercr indulge in ermplants as.to sorrnntii, nor the state of tho oather. They, wci B a- boro such trifling; in other -words they were above making themselves above and above being plcasod. They wero all wisdom, nil gravity, all dignity, and all tediousncss and sarfoiis- ness, .which they bestowed upon compa- ny with more than Dogberry's noble erosity. A man who cannot talk has" no more business in society than a The world is made up of trifles, nnd he who can trifle elegantly and is a valuable acquisition to Mankind. He is a Corinthian column in fabric of J'KKS- Tho following lines nro taken from Siv Humpbroy Davy's Salanionia: 'I envy noqnnlily of thoiniml or intel- lect in it genius, power, yrit, if J could choone what would be the most delightful, nod I useful to me, I saould prefer a firm relig- ious belief to any %otber Messing; for it mnkos life a discipline of goodness es new hope, varnishes and throws orcr tho decay, tho destruction of most georgconi of all light; swnkons lifo even in death, nnd for corruption and cny calls up to benutj1 and divinity; makes an instrument of torture the ladder of ascent to parndlso; and "far nbovo combination of earthly hopeVcalH up ibe most delightful visions of aranths, tho gardens of the blest, and the swurity of ererlaating joys sensualist nnd skeptic only 'gloom, snd a time of mncli nnd consequent discussion, an honex Putchjfnrnaer OB bis opinion as to which denomination of were in the right way Heaven: 'Veil uid he, 'Ten ire ride out wheat to Albany, same die road ii do and say it 'don't raXich difference which we for bdiineM our. icAeat.it   

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Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

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Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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