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Ripon Weekly Times Newspaper Archive: August 29, 1862 - Page 1

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Publication: Ripon Weekly Times

Location: Ripon, Wisconsin

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   Ripon Weekly Times, The (Newspaper) - August 29, 1862, Ripon, Wisconsin                               WeeWj Times: BT BOWBRMAW C. J. ALtKN, OM1CE OPPOSITE THE CITY HAIL, OYJSH STORE Doll.ranil Fifty Ccnli a Year.- To or Bujlncn Cnrd One tlO; Two Sqnnrc' Onr-Hnlf Column, Ooo Column, Foralxmoiichi. chrcc.fiu oflke jcirlr rrtci. For :hrcc [Wo. fifths jrou-lj prkrt. PT7T IT THROUGH. ftTfm the ft-ettm Dully AdYrrtaei.} COTM Freemtn lo the Land, Come meet the Last Doiimni] Htre'.t of Work in hand, J'ut it through tltre'i a Log across tho way V.'t have stumbled on all day, Jlert'ri n. I'lough-slinre in the CUv, I'ut it through JUre'j a country that's half free And for you and mo To SBJT -wh.-it its rate Blmll be, Put it through While one traitor thought remains, While one spot its banner stains, One link of nil Its chains, 1'ut it through TJcnr oiir brothers in llic field, your pwor'ls us theirs nro steeled, l.iriirn'tu wit-Id tho arms they iricld, Tut it through J.'jck Ilie yliop and lock the store  'atln-r ihnt man thrives fvcry vronjion our iwiMity million lives JV: It I lo ru'i llio Trust is :Ti- v-.ni lli-: Uoll is drive it Jlv Ood of Heaven Drive it   whore he foil down a hatch into tho hold, and was nearly killed. I3ut most extraordinary accident which betel hini was that which occurred while his children. Tjikc ic was fond of aston- ishing them with sluight-of-hr.nd trioks, in i which he displayed considerable destei-ity nnd the feat which ho propos'sd, lo THE WEV7 PEM3IONLAXV. j on wns tho passing of a half We the attention of m.r to throi.Sh his mouth out at M3 odr. the ndmh-nblc act of the last session ofi Unfortunately, he swallowed the churn BOIHI> more Butter if lie r. SO there any dinner tba( Peter visite'diUie .dniry-house, ifoundcrenm to replace he lir.d just lost. At it lie goes again, nn'l chu.-us more vigorounly than ever. But, in' "10 midst of his churning, he little too late, to bu sure, but better u'tc than LUc wns still in the tixcl. rcj0icc that if can at least honor, comfort Congress, published in our paper of Sat- urday hist. It makes .1 wise and generous provision for disabled .soldiers nml for sol- diers' families, that will relievo the heart of many a brave man gunofL-rth to encoun- ter disease and dcaln in behrilf of his country. The pensions by tins act are, like Hit pay of our soldiers, larger than es'-nblishSJ by law in any other nation of tlic world. This legislation is ns wise as it is jiist: The families of those who have tiieir lives forlhtir country's charge. Those for and reason do not share the dangers of the campaign, must provide which dropped into his windpipe. among themselves the cares and respon- sibilities which the so'.diw lenves behind him. must shrink from no pecuniary burdens imposed for tliis jnirposc; but cannot, all be high then lit- w.lsT.icle nl i'or well vrUal niui we Uvkc, Wiiii viir K'umcky IrJ us Jowa to swamp, 'i'l.c was loir nnd mucVy; Tlirri- JoiiU Jiull, iu martini pomp, old Ivcutucky. Vai.'ij w.is ioliMe onr breast. we thiiiglil of dying, ti.t-ii we like lo rest, I'nle.-.- pnuio is '.IrhiiiJ it ftoc-t our lilllo i'urce -B-isiic.l it tv be greater, w: 8 h.-i'f s And nil ullipator. our pntirnce tire, tbrv showed Ibrir fncffl Me c'lioon :o waste our fire, krpl unr jOaces; J'.u! wi'tn we saw thcr.i wink, '.Vv thought il lime to stop llicni; Ac-1 :iwoulil have done you Rood, I t'link, To M' found, !nst- 'iwnsvnin to fight, lead w.vrH tfccir boon-, ,--j tln-y took to flight, An4 MS llic bcftutr. Atid if danger c'tr nimoys, our trade .'urt Kentucky Aiid vrc'l! protect you, X.Titurky, tli? luiniersof Kentucky, Thr or Kentucky. stable, :xutl sho wntcr, nlthough the sun iiow ubovo the horizon. Away ho runs to the stable. But oxperictico hr.ij him wise. "I've my little child there rolling on the floor. Now, if I leave tho churn, tho greedy scamp may turn it over and something worse might easily happen. AVhcrcnpon ho takes the churn on )IK back and hastens to the well to draiv iva- tor for tho covr. The well was deep, Tine! tho bucket did not go down fur enough. So Peter leans frith all his might, iu hot haste, on tho rope, ami tnvay goes the cream out of the churn, over his head nnd into the well.! said 'Peter between his teeth, "it's clear I'm to have no butter to- dny. Let's attend to the cow it's to late to take her out to pasture, but there's a lot of hay on the house-thatch that hasn't been cut, nnd so she'll lose nothing' by staying at homo." To get the cow out of the stable and put her on the house-roof was no.great trouble far iho dwelling was set in ft hollow on the hill-side, so that the thatch was almost .on n, level with the ground. A plank served tho purpose of a bridge, and be- hold tho cow comfortably installed in her could and cheer tlic desolated families of tlioso coin, The accident occurred on the 3d of April, 1843, and it was followed by frequent fits of coughing, and occasional uneasiness in the right side of the chest; but so slight was the dU tuvbnr.cn af breathing that it was some time doubted whether the coin haJ really fallen into the windpipe. After the lapse of fifteen Sir B. Brodio met Mr. Key in consultation, and tlicy concurrcd in tho opihion that most proba- bly tho half sovereign wns lodged tit the bo'tom of tho right bronchus. The day after, Mr. Brunei placed himself in a prone position on his fhce upon some chairs, and bending his head and neck downward, he distinctly felt the coin drop toward the glottis. A violent cough ensued, and on resuming Hie posture ho foil na if tho object again removed downward into the chest. Here was an engineering difii- of the Potomac, will characterize leotioii of tho materials army bread. It should trust that wisdom worried out, werhaps, fling him- self on tho floor, and go'tb sleep in sheer desperation, with a liightmnre Bn 'I brain, which magnifies every insfcl into a every gush of hot sultry nir, into 'a sirocco. To roll and toss into wakofulncss is b'ttt natural.. with feverish Uiiirst, he will rnsh'Toi; v ter, and gulp down the foulest lluid1 that ever passed a man's Hiver muddy and thick that a silver dollar is invisible in it vrll8n barely covered in the buttom A'north- Cfn furmjr would carry w.-iler in buckets a mile before ho would allow His cattle to touch such stuff. Exhausted and fretful, rears away the He dots not protend to cat. Tlfcrc is nothing to cat but nrmy rations of salt meat and stule bread, which would turn a. dog sick when the fccling'of disgust comes on; even if he escapes a ruined digestion, of-which there Is but slight' pi-frtmbilily. As right ap- proaches, the hcnt dics-awny, and he hopes for comfort. Most delusive hope As the sun sinks, animated nature comes forth. A low.hum anounccs the gathering of the host, increasing, as they come, nnd filling the atmosphere n-ith the dead) in- fclHblc waraing. There is to be no sleep with thnt sound ringing in the air, and yet every where you turn it still greets you.' The same low, coasclcsa hum, like the distant whir   Hirer in a canoe, with n deaf nnd dumb without a red cent, or :of summer appnrel. .''But a light hcart and a thin pair of breeches goc.i merrily.through the world.'? S.ir, every who lias come here is a Columbus! IIe: corner Iicra to discover new diggins. I am a Columbus.. .1 was dead broke at homo, ns Coltinbus" was, and I have oorno'hero, to strike a new vein. But 1 am not going to tho mines! Oh, no, You don't crtfeli'ine my waist in ice- water with a jurchilo pick-axe r.r.d an .incipient .laboring uiidcr n sun of one hundred degrees, iu the shade, to dig out filthy lucre. Xo, sir! I am not on that lay; I hntc is an invention to vex inankind. I prefer an office, ono that is lucrative nnd not laborious; what you call a sinecure. And if I cannot get one myself, I will go in for any mnn ivho will di vide on the level and no split.-'. Sir, where will you find ft gjorious country like this? Talk not of the oriental gor! gcousresg of Eastern countries. Teh us not of the f.iiry scenes which who revel in the great warm bath of heavenly paint with golden pens on leaves of satin. Tho description of this beautiful country should be writ- ten with the golden wsnd of an dip- ped in tho foftost mfd of asuri'jcam, upon the blushing and dclicnlcsurfac'cof .1 leaf. Excuse me, Gentlemen, 1 except only the vainy scnson and ihe time when dust (lies. love our native we honor her would rob the custom-house, if we had n fhir show. Uut Congress must not put on airs, or wo will take charge of tho custom-house nml post- office, nnd make a muss generally. is my sentiments, A mnn in Arkansas a few days since, went to Gen. T. Shcrmcn, nt Mem- phis, and asked his help to rctnkc a tivc slave, said tho General, The best thing I can do is to advise you to go to the United States Marshall, and go with him.before a Commissioner, haiui in a description of the hoy, get out. a war- rant nnd tell the Mai-shall to hunt him for you. Don't you recollect that n long time ago, as long ago ns 1S50, Con- gress passed a Fugitive Slave law? that is the law, and it just covers yoiu' case." Arkansas, h'urhU1 dulightcu, rushed to the Provost Marshal's office, and told story toCul. Hillycr, who immediately saw the point. "The United shall is-not in said hoi don't say said Pike Co.; "Wheiv.'iio he "I don't rooolJoct (lie time o' liis returned.the oncl, "but I believe it was about nnd n half ago, The fn-.-l is he you follovys did not like the muuhinc ;.LV.' you smashed it, and .wo do not propose 11 set it i-unning again, till wo get. ready." Exit Arkansas, softly whistling the tail leathers of a very flea mingling in.graceful contrast with hi.-; "nut brown Iiiiyrc." that the moment when ho heard the gold piece rtriko against his upper front teeth, was, the most exquisite in his Tvholo life. The half sovereign had been in his windpipe for cot less than sis sewing machine might not bo in England by such effects as IB America, but we believe that its introduo- into.the workshop, the rr.S-.ily f.nd the fac- tory is certain; nnd so believing, wo shall concider it our duty'to popularize thcm-os much as we can American. According to a rain gage kept nt Fort Gftston, Klaroath 'cou'cty, California, by Dr. C. A- rorkpatrick, tho fall of rain al that point torn September 16, 1861, to Juno 18, 1862, a period of nine months, reached the enormous amount of !29 iooh_ es aM a fraction orer.' A farmer in Walla "Walla Valley, Wnsh- .jigton Torritory, last season raised frohi fifty, acres of over threo thousand bushels of barler, which ho sold for the round sum of In 1848 the imports into the prorinco 6; Olago, New Zealand, amounted to 869, and the exports.were nil. In the imports to the siports to J-OK Switzerland they arc very severe on this The Journal do Geneva, man was lately tried at Jug on a charge of having stolen a cat, which ho killed and tc. Being found fuilty ho was condcmn- il. paj- the cost of hia impris- jnorcrit before trial. two days mnris'onmcut, on broad 'and water. receive thirty blows with B tick. remain for four years vithiu his own parish. be in- scribed'on. ihe black list. be placed under the strict surveillance of :hc municipal police. the expense of conveying him Tiome. To nil other expenses, and to the damage OMNIBUS. Appropriate name for a cold A sheaf from the, shock of an. carth- raustTje-a.rare.curiosity. WHyislife the riddle'of riddles cans'e iirt must.all give it'up.. is the'hRriicsV'tb, .tarn? A' Donkey'.. jOf whnt coipr is firass when covcroil with green. Few young'girls arc. so. inconsolable that their hearts cannot be by a Fast horxes win cupc by the use of their legs; fast'men lose their legs by the of cups. Young ladies nre said to liko cold weather because it brings the chnpij trf lips. Model wives formerly look .1 "Btich in now, with the aid'ofa sewing machine, ;thcy take'one in r.o A.young lady down adrertises for a young man that "embraced un. opportu- will como orcr, to our town he can do better." A bashful printer refused a silaation in a printing office where females arc em- ij-AI.vr.3 CIVE.V TOR A "ThO elopement of years of age, with Mclvinn Gainef, 'fifteen years old, both" GlP.ougbkeepeie, is notodin the Pint should mtilha-.tfeume a yatf-onihherVeo thera their girl in his lifc- he never set with a waited st least Simpson prownts his compliments to Mr. Thompson, "rid .begs to request that he will keep his pifigs frorii trespassing on his Thompson presents his compliments to Mr. Simpson, and begs; to request that in future he will hot spell nim. with two Simpson no fwir of Wall on tbs found two gcc? to and feel the to the flrit word in the not. jn.t w Mi to Mr. Thompson and oontciai   

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