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Racine Journal News Newspaper Archive: April 13, 1918 - Page 1

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Publication: Racine Journal News

Location: Racine, Wisconsin

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   Racine Journal-News (Newspaper) - April 13, 1918, Racine, Wisconsin                                THE VOL. LXXTV, NO. 88. JOURNAL-NEWS, RAOIM3, WISCONSIN, SATURDAYAFTERNOON. APKtt 13, 1918. TEN PAGES PRICE THREE CENTS. BRITiSHlTNE RFMBSlrciTGERMANS MAKE SLIGHT KAISER'S TROOPS FORGE Americans and French At- tack the Foe at Apremont Forest and Drive Him Back; Sammies Take 22 Prisoners. AIR RAIDS ALONG ENGLISH COAST AND FRENCH CAPITAL Paris, Apr. The Germans last, night renewed their attacks upon the French positions .In Erulo Woods In the forest of Apromont. American troops in this sector, in conjunction with the French, says today's official statement, have combattecl with vigor and broken the majority of the -enemy attacks. At one point where the enemy obtained a Cooling he -was thrown out by a counterattack. On tha Somme battlefront the entire village of 1 Hangard and 'the adjoining cemetery have been regained from the Germans, in the sec- tor south of the Somme, British and French troops by counter- attacks drove out the Germans from Hansard which they pene- trated yesterday. (By the Associated Press.) In heavy fighting the British are being forced 'back to Bailleaul on the north ffnd toward Alre on the south. "Near the center the British and tho Germans are hotly engaged around St. Venant which marks an approximate advance of 10 miles for the Germans since Tuesday, un th extreme northern and southern end of tho 25-mile front, where the. Ger- mans have at least men, there been little fighting. South of the 'Somnio the Germans forced their way Into Hangard after several hours of sanguinary fighting In which tho French and the enemy attacked and counterattacked. French counterattacks-regained -the western part of tho village 'and South- OVER 35 BOYS BURN IN HOSPITAL FIRE Racine Again Its Lo; 'DOWNTOWN STREETS PACKED BY THOUSANDS CITY SOIONS AWAIT BOND ISSUBREPORT Okla., April tween 30 and 37 boys, aged 10 to '15 years, all .patients at.-the_state hospital here, were .burned to death In a fire of ,.untohpw.n '.origin that completely destroyed, three' wards and the dmmgroom" of the institution. The blaze started, at 3 o'clock this morning. Dr. D. W. ent of the hospital, said. morning that'the death, list may be even greater'than 37 a'nd that steps were .being taken to com- pile a complete list. The flames discovered within a few moments after, they Although every effort was made immediately after the "discovery of the fire to get the children out of Ward 15, panic started among them and it was with the great- est difficulty that any of the'chil- dren in this ward were saved. No lives were lost in Wards 10 and 14, although they'were com- pletely destroyed by flames. The property loss will be it is said. Dr. Griffin expressed the opinion that the flames started In engineroom of the hos- pital. Teachers attempted to mar- shal the children, but most ot them became unmanageable and some rushed .back into the flames. Children the various wards intermingled -and count of those who :haf! been taltcn from the burning-building was lost. GERMANS WOULD DEVELOP FINLAND JAPAX is SIBERIA IF SHE WILL JOIN THE GERMAN- WILl 4CT OX SEWER "AND COAL PROPOSITION WHEN WORD IS "RECEIVED PROM THE. FEDERAL AUTHORITIES. Ordinances proving for the issu- ance- of m bonds for sewers in West Racme and for a Mu- nicipal coal yard were considered by the council In committee of the whole last night, but it decided to defer action until it is ascertained if the government will sanction the sale of SUCity Attorney Burgess informed the committee that-he had written a let- ter -to the Federal Reserve bank of I Chicago, in regard- to ;the method to follow'in making'un application and had answer from w. A. Heath, chairman-of the committee. The city attorney made formal ap- plication-for the approval of the-bond issues directly .to 'the committee at Washington, together with the specific information relating to their present necessity, either'from the standpoint the war or public health- .also that a copy should be forwarded to the subcommittee on capital issues at Chicago. The city attorney submitted two applications which he-had drawn up and would present-to the proper au- thorities. The applications in regard to'tho sewer bonds, set forth'that the territory in which It is proposed to construct sewers is largely a residence district, there being many homes within the territory proposed to be accommodated with sewers; the con- struction of sewers in, this community will add to the health of the.commun- ity as well as the comfort and con- venience of those who connect with the new-sewers; .the conditions in this territory during the wet season are not what they should cellars are filled with water and the sur- roundings generally are unhealthful. The Coal Yard. In the application with reference to the coal yard bonds the attorney rep- resents that the legislature authorises such coal depots and the reasons giv- FINNISH ALLIANCE, IX ATTACK- en why the clftr to take ad- ING- RUSSIA. difficulty which the citizens of Racine experienced in ob- LONDOX, April has i tainlng fuel'during the last year, and he were 'agreed to the establishment of a great- er Finland, including the Petrogram- Murman railway to the Arctic, accord- ing to.1 Swedish press forward Exchange Telegraph dispatch use in the public sc In' the eyent-that I wins on' the western 'front, I coal. If the 'city we heavy lighting; continues. toward HOorgcs, the German attempts were repulsed. from Copenl _ The Apremont Forest, where 'the (Germany, wins on the Americans, and French repulsed the the dispatch says. 'she will begin a new- enemy. Is where the American see-' ..__. i. tor northwest of Toul joins tho Kronen lines. The Germans gained advanced elements, but the Ameri- cans and French made a spirited counterattack and drove them out. tho enemy leaving 22 prisoners :he hands of the Americans. Gentian Aviators Busy. German aerial forces also has been busy. Paris and the east' coast of England raided Friday night. Two airplanes got through the Paris defenses and dropped several bombs, eleven persons being killed and fifty wounded. One or two airships went Inland from the English coast and dropped but not reach ijondon. apparently did Allied airmen war against Russia, co-operating with the Finns. Japan, it Is added, will receive Si- beria if she joins in the German Fin- n'sh alliance. LONDON, April Germans made an attack last night west of Merville on the northern battlefront and were repulsed, the war office an- TO WITNESS 70 CITY EMPLOYES GIVEN WAGE BOOST INCREASE WILL AMOUNT TO ABOUT" S2 PKR WEEK FOR EACH 'OF THE MEN WORKING FOR BOARD PUBLIC WORKS. Seventy employes of the city, em- bracing those at the garbage, plant and others; in the board of ..public works, will'each receive an increase of wages amounting to 52 .per week, he Increase to take effect at once. was unanimously decided upon at a meeting of the council in com- mittee of. the whole last night. Engineer Connolly brought the matter up and at-the same time said hat the employes had presented a petition, signed by the men, in which iiey asked for an increase of a have been very busy bombing mili- tary targets behind the German lines and In aerial fighting the British have brought down 35 German ma- chines. 14 out of-control. t Teutons Finn Naval Raul. Reports received in Switzerland Indicate that a German naval raid in groat force- Is soon to be attempted. There has been great activity among tho naval -basis In northern Germany jnd coal and' ammunition are being hurried to the warships. Battleship Is Sunk. Tho German battleship Rhineland of tons is reported to have struck a mine sunk in the Bal- tk- while another report says she only grounded.___________ STORAGE HOLDINGS OF DAIRY PRODUCTS D. C., April Increase in storage holdings of dairy products, eggs, and frozen and cur- ed meats of all classes was shown today in the department of agricul- ture's summary of its canvass on April 1 comparing the stocks with those on that date a year ago. Frozen beef Ijoldinss were pounds, an increase of 62.7 per cent. Cured beef pounds, in- crease 7.7 per Frozen lamb and mutton pounds, increase 16.1-per cent. Frozen pork pounds, increase 73.4 per cent. Dry salt pork pounds, Increase 78.2 per cent. Sweet pickled pork pounds, Increase per cent. Lard increase 31.4 per cent. Creamery buttor pounds Increase 10S.3 per' cent. Packing stock butter pounds, increase 1SS.5 per cent. American cheese pounds Increase 225.6 per cent. Case eggs cases, increase 7 6.-I per cont. Frozen eggs S.S35.G65 creasc 216.6 per cent. B. W. Brandenberg of Camp Ouster, speaka to men Sunday. 3 p. M. C. A.. Ladles' -Symphony Quartet. Girl grade-, grad- uate, second iloor Journal-News Of- PARIS, April letter written by Emperor Charles-to Prince Sixtus Bourbon outlining the means by whlch France might attain peace was, upon Its receipt immediately com- municated to all of France's allies, says-tho Petit Parlsien. It was un- animously decided, the paper adds, at nr. Interallied conference which was 1-eld shortly afterward that there was no occasion to act on the emperor s suggestion, ___ Second, The prices which they were compelled-to pay for fuel to those who- conducted the fuel yards. The city of Racine purchases each year for schools and public of .___ >vere conducting a coal yard-the coal could'be'bought at a much less price than the city is now compelled -to pay. The prices which the city paid for coal last .year are quoted and, as for. coke, a'nd' It. has been demonstrated that certain individuals who bought I carload lots got it at considerably better prices than they could have got It had they been compelled -to purchase It from the local coal yards. Some Discussion. Alderman Freeman asked if it was necessary to issue the sewer bonds and pay big interest when there was money in the city treasury which could be used, If the sewers are a'n actual necessity. Douglas Fairbanks will be Monday s Alderman Miller, said that lie'i great attraction and wih make a thought the money in the treasury number of whirlwind talks at the the- might be used-for the purchase of atres in the downtown section. He Liberty Loan bonds. MILWAUKEE OPENS DRIVE WITH PARADE MILWAUKEE. Wis., April The third Liberty Loan was to be ush- ered into Milwaukee this .afternoon with a big street-demonstration in the form of a parade in which sevora.l ihousand citizens planned to .take part. Steam whistles and church bells were to have five noise making, heralding the launching of the drive. Every large industrial, civic, fra- ternal and patriotic organization planned to take part in the demon- stration. Many features, including represen- tations of a tank, .siege, gun and: bat- tleship were to be given a place in the long line. A military division xmder command of- General Charles King was to lead the parade. FAIRBANKS WILL BE HERE-MONDAY WELL KNOWN MOVIE-STAR-COM- ING TO DELIVER THEATRE AD- DKESSES TO .BOOM SALE OF LIBERTY LOAN BONDS; J will tend to.put the drive After more or less discussion it for the sale of the third Lioerty loan was decided to let the ordinances go over until word is received from Washington relative to the applica- tions. AGED MOTHER LOSES TWO SONS BY DEATH bonds and he is determined vto give the best'there is in1 him to the cause .of the nation. He will arrive here from- Chicago at o'clock and make a short Machine Turns Turtle at Sorensou's Curve Dealing Instant ZKjatli to Lmvrence Baldwin, Whtio Marshall Rung-c'DiesOn Way to Hospital. DR. GOEBEL, SERIOUSLY HURT, WILL RECOVER Killed. Marshall Runge, 22 years old, mad: carrier. Franksville. Lawrence Baldwin, 40 years old, bartender, Franksville. Injured- Dr. Henry Goebel, Franksville; lefi arm broken; cut and bruised and-'in- ternally injured. from the Junction shops. In an automobile accident, shortly alter 6 o'clock Friday .evening w about half a mile east.f Franksville A sad and double sorrow prevails in the home of Mrs. Mary Wilson. 517 Hubbard street. On Thursday her son Daniel Wilson, passed away, at the age of 49. and last evening William Wilton, another son, died, aged '55. The aged mother, left to mourn this double affliction, Is also dangerously ill. Both Daniel and William Wilson were born in here all of their lives, and were well known on the north side. The-double'funeral'will take place at Monday morning from the1 home on Hubbard street, and at 9 o'clock from the St. Patrick's church. Interment will be in the Calvary cem- proceed to the Elks' club after that talk, being in charge of a. reception committee. At the Elks' club-he will be given a reception and then start in on his speaking tour. He will appear at the Palace thea- tre at about 2 o'clock and at the Bijou at o'clock. From there he will jump-over to the Strand theatre or. Wisconsin street, where Jie will taJk at o'clock. At 3 o'clock lie be at the Rex theatre'.and at o'clock he-will begin his .talk at the Orpheum, remaining there for half an hour. ;His.-final talk-here will be at the veek, on -account of the high cost of Iving and- -general- conditions, Mr. Connolly said that the total number of men was about seventy and the in- crease would amount to about a week. He favored the increase. He said -that many of the men were threatening to quit because they can get positions where. with better pay else- Floats Arouse Applause From Crowds; Tank From Case Company Is Realis- tic Feature, While Refu- gees Strike Horror of War Home. JACKIES FROM GREAT LAKES GIVEN PLACE OF HONOR AT HEAD Racine's loyalty demonstration this afternoon was a real demonstration, men women and children marching in the ranks. It was a showing of which Racine may well be proud and to which It can point with pride. It was made up, not of a certain class, but of all the people, the rich march- Ing with the poor, all mingling to- gether intent on showing that Racino is not to be listed among the slacker communities and demonstrating that they are tfack of the campaign for the sale of the Third Liberty Loan bonds -ivhich starts on Monday and contin- ues through the week. The parade was most imposing, Alderman Pfister strongly favored the -increase. Alderman Freeman agreed with Alderman Pfister, but relieved that-it should be referred to a special committee to go over the question carefully and confer with the city engineer. 'Alderman Pfister was not favorable to this, but thought the request should be-granted at once or there might be trouble. Mayor .said that the only thing to do was to give the men the Increase. He told how one'tlrm in tms city was around offering men 475 cents an hour and that. Gary, Ind., men were here offering ?5 a day for men'. Alderma.n Smader said that employ- ers had been..to him-OTid-.wanted men. at Addison talked in favor of the request-of the men and Alder- f-------------------- man Jorgenson talked strongly for sections. The parade followed, tha the- Increase and .he made motion published line of march, passing that it be the sense-of'the commit- through Park avenue. Sixth street, tee that the-prayer of the petitioners Main, street and North Main street North, side people saw the pa- rade from North Main street where the countermarch waa carried out. Every band In the city and several outside bands were engaged occasion, as there can. never be too much music. In addition to the banda made up as It was-of many semi-mili- tary organizations- The Jackies from the Great Lakes' station and the sol- diers on the floats lent the real mili- tary air, so popular and significant, now that the United States Is' heart and soul in the world war for demo- cracy and thousands of its boys are In the front lines, by the side of, the French and British soldiers who have stood the brunt of battle for three long years. Thousands Line Streets. While thousands were in line other thousands lined the streets in   TI-JII i last Marshall Runge and -Lawrence Bald win were killed and Dr. Henry Gocbe seriously Injured.. The three men 'had been- to Racine and started for their homes in Franks- yille, when turning on the highway at what is known as the Sorenson curve, Mr. Runge driving, the auto turned a somersault, throwing the three occu- pants clear of the machine. Mrs. C. P. Soremton, who iv-as m her yard, -and Dr. Fred Frltchen, standing in the door of his home, wit- nessed the accident. With others they ran to the scene and it.was.found that Mr. Baldwin had been instantly kill Milwaukee wil be in the grill room died en route o the Gimbe, store, where he speak, at u o ciociv. Our Backs to the Wall; Stand to the Deatk" Field Marshal Sir.Douglas Haig in a spe- cial order of the day, addressed to "all ranks of the -British army in France and says Make Your Money Fight Wear this Button. "Three weeks' ago today .the enemy began his terrific .attacks against us on a fifty mile "front. -His objects are.to separate us from the French, to" take the channel ports, and to destroy the British-armv. "In spite hun.dr-.ed ..and six divisions (1 438420 men) into the battle and -enduring the. most.reckless sacr nfice of human lifer-he': has- yet' made, little -progress toward his goals. c "We owe this to. the'-determined-fighting, and self-sacritice ot. our troops Words fail me to express the admiration .which I feel for the splendid-resistance offered-'by all ranks'of our army under the -most trying circumstances. "Manv amongst us now are tired. To-those I would say vic- tory will belong to the side which holds out the longest. "The French army is moving rapidly and in great force to our support. There is no other course open to us, but to fight it out. "Every position must be held to the last man. There must be ,no retirement. With our backs, and believing m the justice of our each one.of us must fight to the end. "The safety of our-homes and the "freedom ,of mankind depend -alike-upon the atcthis.'critical-moment." CASE WORJECERS BUY MA2OT MKERTY BOJTDS Up to 5 o'-clock yesterday after- noon the employes at the J. I. Case Threshing .Machine company had nearly, all subscribed for one or more of .the bonds, and the to- tal amount went up to more than of Mr. -Baldwin removed to .t f Continued on page of anniversary county at a soft hats, shirts, underwear and socks. credly com- The police are searching for the trio forty- who evidently have been, in hiding the establis- i here since the other burglaries. and to instill in the hearts and mind f came of all a patriotic fervor that will ever 1021 Sixteenth perpetuate that democracy and in- i in all to about In addition to oil -huTnon tfnri I the clothing stolen there were taken crease its benefits to all human kind, numeroua bnlckel, and ffold musd, watches, gold filled rings, stick pins, cuff buttons and lockets. Two new- tan colored leather suit cases are also missing. One of the suit cases is of the bel- lows type, being capable of being en- larged. Entrance was gained to the store through a rear window which, was pried open with a'tool of some kind. CONFEREES REVAMP SABOTAGE BILL WASHINGTON. D. C., 'pril Provisions in the sabotage bill -penal- izing acts obstructing production of war materials were eliminated, from the .measure today by senate and house conferees. struck out the clause permitting labor'to strike for higher wages, which the senate had rejected. ______________ AMERICA We Love Our America and Will Always Be Loyal to Her SENATOR STONE SAID TO BE MUCH WORSE WASHINGTON, D. C., .April Senator Stone, of Missouri, who suf- fered a. stroke of paralysis last Wed- nesday, became worso today, after spending a restless night and is in a iserioua condition, his physicians said. WELL-KNOWN MINISTER DIES AT WHITEHALL Wis.. April Rev. N. widely known -throughout. .Wisconsin and where1'.he 'has "held numerous pastorates, dieji at his home.after-a: brief-illness; with :pneumoriia. WEATHER FORECAST CHICAGO. April Fair warmer in north west; Sunday unsettled, probably showers in west in afternoon. Maximum 54 30 P.ange -4 Coal: The best Perry county 'nut ,coal sold at per ton delivered, as long as It lasts.' Act'quick. :12S6'Mound Ave., plone Don't; f orget'.dancerat lingsweiler's hall, Corliss, Star-tasi. -Pious 2-40 and adv. We honor our Country; with -deepest reverence, We love her with affection .pure and -fervent, We serve .her-with of Stead- fastness and ardent-'loyalty. country of the .best .world ever knew. Dur country, the east, with her hills and valleys, __ .Her countless rocky shores with her beautitul The-north With-her.thousands'.of towns and harvest.homes, With her frontiers of the.'lakes-and ocean. The west with her forest-sea-inland isles'and-grandeur of scenery, Her fertile fields clothed with golden grain. Our beautiful Ohio, our verdant Missouri; The south with her- snow-white "cotton fields, The rich plantations of rustling- cane, The golden robes of rice Our country's mineral wealth, the richest- and best nation in the world; This 'is our United sister families, one ereat, loyal, holy nation. g A U. S. N.-VOLUNTEER. Rememberl The community "meeting in the, first Presbyterian church Monday Speakers of International reputation- The Community chorus will adv. __ _ "Brandy" at 'the Men hear Brandenberg at Y. M. C., A Sunday 3 p. m.. Triangle at Camp Custer." Ladies' adv. Wanted Experienced s t e n o g- rapher; Hartmann Trunk adv. Boy Journal-News office; second adv. Polo and adv. tonight, given by Polish- Turners, Polish, hall. adv. Make Your Money Fight" Wear this Button.   

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