Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Racine Democrat Newspaper Archive: April 19, 1858 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Racine Democrat

Location: Racine, Wisconsin

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Racine Democrat, The (Newspaper) - April 19, 1858, Racine, Wisconsin                             A YEAR IN ADVANCE. MCINE, WIS, MONDAY, APRIL 19. 1858. WHOLE NO.- SOB, IBS BACIXX BIKOCBAT oTory MONDAY MOWING In Iho (oppoiito tlio Bnkor llouio) by Z. C. AVouttvortli. ouo yew, lu (0 RAIES OK ADVERTISING. [12 llnfli or leu, cloto uiattor, Sonpartol, nnket iqua 11 11 Mo. Qmirterof Col., Third of Col., Culuiuo I DC 200 3 00 4 00 5 'DO' 1 74 100 (1 00 S 00 9 (W 4 W 00 19 OU 13'50 19 00 8 W WOO 15 00 io oo 41 00 13 00 18 00 30 00 21 CO U 00 tliuliuM Cnrds, In column, fit your, Notices, and kupt on tlii> or ordinary 60 por cent. ordinary I. ftt statute not ucccmifmlilud with directions will iiuirtotl till and for accordingly. Vfirlyttilfortlrtfrii nllovrvd the prlvilupi of chaiiKlnK JOB PRINTING .if dnicriptian urutly uxocutctl oil ihort uotlco JUDD   .M.MIIOOTM, -B..JWI1LI, NOW For tin Deuicxr.l. Bouudwl on tho Xut bj Kocky Mountain clialn, OB the Woit bj ihi billon-i oitbn m.ln, Strclcl.lng to.tlio Ji'onh-to Uw forty-nluth While tho Columbia on the Sou Ui uur walori to tho CIV. Thui you u-0 from Orrgon wo go' illce, Ana It ATuhlugtoh, Ihii modocn Pnraillio. Xo.oxtrcmcB haro wo hero heat or cold, "Which kllU ttio olJ folks and miikm tho young onci old, But our mild and hoalthynpyou could wiah U bo, And goullo brwic li blowlugnlwuyj fresh from Whistling through tho and iljhlng o'or the tills, Qrantlug.Ilfo mid houlth without one ofplilj. Our vultoya uru till coursed by A thousaud illvcr Uroanii, Dunclnff OR In cud thvir music leauti To give rest to the weary and tipldu to the End, Aud without IntoxlcMioa tho- iwvctcftt can bo hud, For we hftvo the puroit lu ovory hill and mountain, And ulwnyn take It frebh from Its imtivp founmiu. Aud of most beautiful wo can proudly boant, UorduHug on tho tcroaini from themuuntuitu to the They are ueitbar.wet in uor In summer dry, But and Koutly rolling juiit to thu tillcr'H eye; And nroducQ to perfection, ouu, barley, rye acd And vt to ummtuoth vcgetobtos, thoy cannot well bo bc.tt Our forosts are.componed of Cronnd pines, And art- iv tourer ofweRUtl, csclusive of our niinci, nkirt our uobla rivcrsund decfc tliotnouutaiuMbrow, Aud nl look as verdnnt od yon them We cyqvert them into timber, Kpnru, or any thln3 we CAQ Aud thvut to thu Ulauds, to OUiua or Japan. v-'o have a spuclous harbor dftwo hundred uillenor moro, And t'nrh fariuor linn niarlcut right IUM door, And of all tho Itallronit tliat yet been fuund, The direct and natural poiuU to Puget Sound. Then who can fail to pee onr future npn-ud out HO plalu buforo, Kten now the commorce of the world knocking at our door. doubts and fears of'his darling Kate's con-1 or three panes of glass extra, in breaking stancy. out the remainder of the already fractured This was what sh'e-wrote one, making, in fact, just the kiud-of noise MY OWN DEAR I am so sorry that.! could not meet you as I promised. I always try to keep my engagements, and.you know, you dear fellow, that I would.do.anything for.you, but aunt Spinela has actually forbidden me to go out, unless she accompanies me. Isn't it too bad I do not know what we shall do, but I dare say you can find some way of seeing me soon are so good at doing queer you disguise yourself, somehow, and come to the house on some business Ouly don't frighten me by doing anything suddeu, there's a dear! I shall be very miserable till I see you again, but I'm jure I can't help loving you, can I? It isn't fault, and I really don't believe there's any harm iiu it, for .all aunt Spinela says, and I do think she is a hateful, ugly, odious old I'roui the (X. Y.) Golden Prize. Love and Strategy. BY GEORGE ARNOLD. creature I only wish- but I won't tell you what, till you come to see me, and-that you must do very you hear Meanwhile, I am, Yours, and your only, dear Tom, KATIE. Tom Beverly was foolish enough to kiss this letter a number of times, and to apos- trophize the lady of his love in, terras which, to an impartial observer, would read very like nonsense. Then IJD begun to consider the sugges- tion of a disguised visit, which artful little proposed. It wasu't a bad idea, although, perhaps somewhat difficult of execution, for, however well such things read-in novels, when you come to try tlieui on, dear reader, you will find, as I have found ocfore now, that they are rather ticklish pieces of business Fancy Tom Beverly, then, standing in his his feetstrtchcd wide apart, Tom Bevorley was one of thps-e unfor-1 his hands buried deeply in his pockets, his tunatcs who are always laboring under some mighty difficulty, beset by several thousands of insurmountable obstacles. But, somehow or another, ho always con- trived to overcome these troubles in the end, aud Co please himself very well, until another mighty difficulty arose before him, and several other 'thousands of obstacles beset him. Poor Tom Bevcrley I One of ais most brilliant misfortunes, which occurred last winter, was'falling heels over head in love with an exceed- ingly pretty girl. ______ 1 kuuw ilia i'the' young lollies who read this, will sec nothing vory unfortunate in thut, and many young gentlemen will con- sider it a very good place of fortune, the more especially wbcu I state .that the ex- ceedingly pretty girl also fell hecla over head iu love with Tom Beverlcy. But the exceedingly pretty girl had ao I say any more? The aunt, Miss Spinela Thorn was a grim virgin of forty-eight, as ugly as an unlimited number of hedge-fences, uud as sour in her temper as can be imagined. Tom Bevcrley was a jolly, thoughtless t'elluw, who loved a good cigar, a friendly glass of wine, and a frolic, as well us any man I know. Therefore, iliss Thorn and he were at sword's a tacit dec- laration of war was made by the spinster, as soon as she heard of declaration of love which Tom, the miscreant, had made, to he: niece, Kate Fletcher. Katie, poor girl, having.no parents.liv- had beenadc-ptedby lieraunt, and had alwavs regarded hur as she had the mis- sioiii'ry tea-parties :md doleful-prayer mect- which the spinster dragged her to, some three nights per a sort of exem- plary and necessary inlliction, the good ofw'hichslie hoped to appreciate, some time" when she became good enough." She had thought, too, when Tom Bever- lcy told her he loved her, that it was very wrong of her not to be horrified, as her aunt was, at his wickedness, and told him so. She said she could never love him in return, nnd in proof thereof, she kissed him. She tcld him to forget her, and nve him one of her curls to assist lain in window, and by au wlliD-nbout now. smoking rap cocked meditatively over his right eye, his. cigar clenched nervously between his teetli, aud the lately-received IMct doux lying open on the table before him, in a brown study of ths deepest dye subject, "disguises." Just at that moment, a gruff voice, of a decidedly foreign quallity, cried out, di- rectly uuder the window "Glarsh Signifying, incur language, Glass put in." An idea struck Tom. He rushed to the he had mentioned. Katie stiiidlonger than he had expected, and, having got ready to put in the gloss which he no more knew how to do than he did how to glazier-lover got tired, and threw ofi'his disguise, appearing, as a gentleman should, in respectable habili- ments of broadcloth un velvet. At this juncture, he heard a step in the entry, and doubting not that it was Katie's he started forward. The door opened, and there, to his inconceivable horror, stood Miss Spiuela Thorn, looking more grim aud sour-fiiced than ever! The ancient lady gave one gluncc, and seeing only that the apparent glazier was at nil, jumped at onee to a pet idea of hers; namely, that she was about being robbed bys burglar. This idea prompted her to shriek out, Murder! fire thieves help and to fall on the floor in a condition of syncope, familiarly -known as "fainting dead away." Tom did not, as he ought to have done, throw water iu her face, or apply burnt feathers to her nostrils. On the contrary, he darted from the io a state of ex- citement which drove nil thoughts of ex- planation out of his head. lie was-fairly nonplussed, for the nonce, and in thc-fvieudly quiet of bis lodgings cogitnted in vain how to make up for the coitt-rc-teiiips which had just occurred. He was aroused from his however, just before dinner-time, by a small boy who came with a note for him. Of course it wns from Katie. I don't think tbat the passion for intri- gue exists in racn, half so powerfully as it does in the other sex. At nil -events, I never saw a man who could begin to rival a woman in plots and counter-plots. In this case, -while Tom Beverlcy was quiteat a loss, his Dulcincu Imd thought the whole thing out; like a flash. Bless you, there was n young lody who; tried, not Ion njy bonne mn fairy footstep at the door, and in a' moment, clasped Katie F.l.etchcr in his nrms- ar- resting her, as it were on a warrant from the court of Dan Cupid. A hnckuey-coach stood just around the corner previously engaged by and in it he nnd Entie were soon snugly en- sconced and rolling rr.pidly away, Two rooms afa'hotel, acconiodatcd the runaways for the rest of the night, and in the morning, a certain clergyman, whom I might name, if it were noMbr getting him in bad odor. with. his fellows, for irregular proceedings, tied the knot handsomely, and received a bank bill, (Don't be inquisitive about its denomi- nation I don't know everything The couple then set out, at once, on their wedding tour, and were joyfully re- ceived by Tom's friends in a somewhat distant part of the country. Lest my lady readers might accuse me of omitting particulars of an interesting character (to them) I will here say that Katie had prepared herself for the trip, during the evening, while the "policeman" was enjoying his sherry in the basement, and that the hackmnn who drove thcu) to the hotel, had carried a small' trunk from the hall, where Turn had noiselessly con- veyed it, to his hack. A month afterward brought back Mr. and Mrs. Beverley to the city, and I am happy to say, they nre still liviugin a high- ly respectable part of town, enjoying life as only the newly-) married can enjoy it. As for IMiss Spinela Thorn, she knew nothing of this little escapade, until she arose, the morning after. It was then that she learned the whole story, with many additions and comments, of nn extraordi- narily imaginative nature, frora the lips of the couk who, I regret to say, had informed herself of the particulars, through that well- known but unjustifiable key hole of the kitchen door. She however, was altogether on her "young missus'" side, and would uot have spoilt the sport, for nny consideration whatever. g ago. to find out who was I made a fc (for, the time being.) Ij the pret Miss Thorn fretted and fumed, and threat of keeping her niece out of ____ ty little property which she held, was determined she shouldn't but iu the lattcr's guardian, but a brief consul- days, she had the whole secret out of me, j tation with a Sawyer caused her to change ia spite of my teeth. j her mind, and allowing Katie, Tom, and And after that, she-had the coolness to; the property to retire from her mind, she say I never was good at that sort of thing, you too bonestroyself 1" Oh, was she! But my affairs are nothing to you, dear reader, Tom Beverly is the gentleman I'm t- fi t i i knte 1-letchcr s plun that he wanted.him. .The glazier descend- ed to the basement door, where Tom in a moment met him. "Here, do you want to.sell iss "Do you want to sell out your glass-box, and coat too "Yas der liiumcl you vants mil mine box and mine coat? You viil make some fool off me a the belief that the professed glazier-wus a professional burglar, aud should work her up into such a state of alarm, that she would consent to engage a policeman to stay in or about the house, during the night or two following. It is needless to say, that Torn Bcverley was to be the police- man, and to remove nil obstacles, Katie di- rected him where he might get a blue I coat and cap, from the husband of-Miss Thorn's couk, who hud lately been a mcni- m I J. UUI II 3 UUUJl. WliU liUU u "No no, aid Tom, "L wantto buy bcr if not useful body your bos glass, putty, nnd all. j you take? and he pulled out bis port. )lad Bitten and sent note almost monmue, to signify his earncotneB. j d h own mcrcl vill you gif? (the man was of _-, _.-.. j Hebraic "Two dollars." "Oh, mine Gott, der bos clarsh was wort .more as two dollars "Avaritious said Toui, "I'll give you three." ".Not more "Not a red cent inorc, and you arc a ras- cal to ask "Yell; das iss very shcap for der box rind der glnrsli. You can nicht find besser glarsh as in der whole city." "Will you take three dollars, or leave before I kick you out "Ach hiinrocl you -wasn't .get mad about him; you'may take der box." And the extortionate glazier unstrapped his wares, and received a three dollar bill in-payment therefor. The next move on Tom'e part, was to presort the man with a hat and coat, in re- turn for'his own ragged but capacious gar- ments, which, greasy; and worn, were far' more appropriate to bis business than any of so doing. TLeu she.bi.de him go, never j Xom's elegant but somewhat seedy cast-offa to see her again, and to expedite his dcpar-' ture, clung to him, and wept so bitterly, that poor Tom, who among bis other fail- _ ings, was'susceptible, had to stay nwlule sadly-interlarded with ci- '------1--J----- would be. These little, matters arranged, Tom in- tic musicar swindlers d.ted a note her m plain brirber.S- her that it was addressed to the cook's husband, asking him to come to the house that'night. Arti'ul ICatie 1 Tom laughed inordinately at this strata- gem, as you or I might, reader if we re- ceived such an appeal. But if the glazier idea was a.good cue, this wag far bettor, and Tom was at the house, within ten minutes after .his dinner. The mention of Miss Fletchers's nanie secured him a good reception, fur the couk's warm Hibernian heart had long overflowed with adujiration for the missus" purty dnrlin' child and the hus- band had often" heard' praises showered upon her generosity and beauty. A pretext for going.to a fancy.dress ball in police uniform quieted all apprehensions, and a liberal offer for the hire of the coat and cap brought them outinsfcmtcr. Too) plunged herself still more deeply into the dissipations of missionary tea-parties and doleful prayer-meetings. Lotus hope that slic was ns happy there- after, :is Mr. and Mrs. Bevcrlcy ntsi_ As this is the .season of 'when people-begin to clean, up and make things look irefsli for the approaching sum- mer, we copy from the last Ame- rican the following in respect to the best cheapest whitewashes, both for the in- side :tcd outside of Take hal f a bushel of fresh" b'uriicd whi te lime, and slack it citlierwitU.h'ot-or cold water, in a tub or barrel. When'thorough-- ly thickened, dissolve in the water requir- ed to thin the lime, two qnnrts-of common suit, stir it thoroughly, add one quart of sweet milk, and it is ready for use to put on with a brush. This wash is for the outside of build- ings, fences, and is very Sonic put glue in whitewash, and others flour and rice paste; but these render it liable to scale off in very drp weather. The above wash may bo made a cream color by the addition of ochre. The above whitewash is all that can be desired for the interior of houses, except- ing the salt, it must be omitted, as it tends to moisture. French white is superior to lime washes for the ceiling of rooms, as it is less liable to turn yellowish in color, but it rubs out so easily'that it can not be used for side walls. TOR. arc four grnnd arguments for the truth of the The fimt.is tft'c roirncles on record the vccoiid the prophecies; the third tlic goodnpssof the doctrine the fourth the moral of the penmen from Divine piiri'ty. Thus Chrisiinmty is built upon these rntirirarcovnUe the power, tho underman ling, flio goodness, the purity of Cod. Tho Bible must.be one of these things; cither an invention of good men'or good angels or bad men or bad or s revela-" tionfrora God. But it could not be tl'ie inven- tion of pood mt'D or angels for_ they neither would nor could make book telling lies at the time, sitting, "Thus suith the when they knew it nil to be their own inventions. It could not be the invention of wicked men, or for they could not make n' book -which com- mands all duty, which foroids nil si as, and which condemns theirfiO'jlstonlletcrnity. The ooncluniou is Bible must be given by Divine Simpson. LOSING FAMILY is nome thing exceedingly tender, us well instructive in tho following, which wo take from the Child's Piper: A few years ago a merchant failed in busi- ness. He went home one evening in great agi- tation. "What is the matter asked wife. "I nm ruined I atn bcggnrcd. I have lost my he exclaimed, pressing his hnnd upon his forehead ns if his brains were in a whirl. hinwifo I om left." "All baid his eldest boy 'fheru ami." "And I too, mid his little girl running-up and put- ting her arms around hia neck. "I's not'lost, repeated Eddie. "And you have your health said wife. "And your two' hands to work snid his eldest; "and I c.-in holp you." "And your two feet, pnp.i, to1 carry you about." "And your two cyca to nee with, said little 'Eddie. "And jou have said grand- mother. "And a good taid his wife, "Aud a heaven to go hia little girl. "And Jesus to come ncd fetch us tlio eld- est. "God forgive said the poor merchant bursting into tears. "I have not lost my nre the few thousands which I called my .ili, to those more precious things which God' has, left :ue and he cl.-.sped his family to his bosom, nnd Icisicd his wife nndchildrcn with a thankful heart. Ah, no, there are many things more precious sjmn gold and bank stocks, valuable-as these be in their place. When the Central Amer: ica was foundering -ut sea, ba'gs and purses of gold were strewn about the deck, as worthless as tue merest" the priijrci. T. "Water, -was the" prayer. bread it was worth its weight in gold, if gold could have bought it. The loss of property must not cloud the mind with a wicked forgetfulncss of the great bless ings which arc lef: behind. No men should dea psir, for no man as all until he has lost his integrity, lost the mercy of God, and lost his hope of henveu at last. InEA or fineit a thumlor storm extant wan when Wiggins cune Rome tiglit. ''How is s: teacher, and had drunk much lemon n-'e or something. Be- came into the room among hi'g wife ters, and just then he tumbled over cradki.' and fell on the floor. After a while hejoic and naid "Wife, nre you hurt "No." _ you "No." clu'p', wasn't it Si( Wslter Scott never wrote trtfer wirdi tMitBTO better fitted to' biud the human family in tics cf brotherhood "The race of mankind wonld perisli did'thcj ecatcto help each' other. From the that the mother binds the child's head till the moment that some kind assistant wipes the dentil-dump from brow of the dying, we can notcxiit-witliout mu- help; All, therefore, that need' aid have-a right to it of their fellow -mortals. No ouo who the power of granting, can refuse without guilt. Tin ISLAND or CUBA. There are sixty porta in last ycsr 'th'ero' wore coastwiao arrivals, clearances' Tbis will giveim-idca of the tr'itd'e of this beautiful island, which is not taore than half cultivated. Hero, ilaroci, sec what a good littls vifejr I've: been iri'ybur Absence. you've been away amusing yourself, I've cleaned all your pipes. air, I'll be bound you wouldn't fcnow this this Meerschaum' again It looki nice and clean now, doesn't it? though you can't tell: what a deal -of tirau it took, me to lake all tho color and dirt off. I-- assure jou I hn'l to scrape it ever 60 lliict with an oyster knife! [Poor Jarries looks very, -diacuufcolate. and, gazing with eyes' of abject- despair on him favorite Meerschaum, had taltcn'hira five years' hard embking. to turns upon his hcU, and wipes away a tear It is with men ai with trees ;s if you lop off their finest branches, irjtowhich they were pour- ing their young life juice, the wounds will be healed over with some rough boss. odd ei- crcjccnco and what might h'ave been a grand tree, expanding into liberal shade, is but a- whimsical, mishhapen trunk. an irrita" ting fault, many an unlovoly oddity has come of a hard sorrow, wli-icli has crushed and maim- ed the nature just when it was C-Vpanding into plenteous beauty, and the trivial, erring life, which we visit with our harsh-, blame, .mar but the unsteady motion of a- rhiin whose best finib is withered [Blockwood.- take the following rich mor- sel from one of Dow, jr.'s short patent ser- mons Man looks upon life just as he looks up- on is no living with them, nnd he can't live without them. He will longer, to dry her tears and console her. This he did, and so effectually, too, that when he departed, she was all smiles instead of tears, and something niysJerioui was whispered between them, about meet- ing, something that sonnded very like an engagemcntfor an interview on the sly. Yonng folks, will1 old folks can't.help it. r But Fate, ;wbo delights, in playing most-shabby character, upon the said young-folks, .contrived to inform Miss- Thorn what danger her niece was that-inestimable old maid her foot down. tbat ;Tou> sboul'd: nevermore setAi's, foot dotrn-iniide her threshold. MoreoTcr took menisures ;.to knock tha private in terview on.. the' poor little Katie tears .were, un- dried, that evening, for., Tom Wiitedan the plaoe ofroD.dezyous, amoking an unnecessary number of cigars, and oc- casionally jnutttering words will not do to print in such ooluuins _ ;-Two 'the Vpostman de-; livered a'pretty little note, to'Mr: Thomas Baverle j. teiding of another pri; rat. oorrMpondence; quite out'; of- the- frpba this delioately-j which 10 j pres-K-ns of-adoratipn-to leave the dreary. A visit to the barber's, where the. razor freely used, made a still further altcr- fu--o'' -t -fru' -ViBuya in the policemen and when guardianship of Spinela Thorn, and Tom lnookcd xhorn's to. become. .Mrs'. t dfl with ...If ;she would break a window in ld haye been willing to i j. I lUliliCl WUUiU uarc WVM n her fooffl, be Would pass the house a j swcar to his identityi however much he rlnv. in rfazier m5ght'taTe'been inclined to swear at his given day, in. glazier cos- sli'e could call him in. TKcy could then together, arid before Miss discover the.plot, they Would'bo niiiD.an'd.wife. At tha" appropriate .time, Tom arrayed, -himself in a suit, which'. might, serve as necessary, coveriog.all 'with, tlie gjaiier's pulling :tben; set as a neighboring dock struct, hbtir of Miss Thorn, .shouting in a "Glarshp-t i .An .upper .window. ;.W8S .hastily.; land sw.eey'y.oic'e" which "The in was jn.the presence of hiija- 'dy-love'." move as f he moment .i an elopemeai-pmthBTBpur of but Tom's logic prevailed of golden _ _ f" ____ i_" ____ mnn ur of., the moment, I" f _ stay d ''eL" Ktfie departed, and, Tom ifflMbed two arrayed himself in them, and looked like a ran'after them, and rather than bc held remarkably elegbnt dramatic sort of police-1 he will loose his coat tail nnd as'miglit appropriately be in- kiss them for love and kiss them for lead- troduced into .a locul American opera, and j ing him. into trouble. So with life'. He made to sing extraordinary roulades nud j partakes of its pleasures, and then 'curses it shakes, befoW..going to arrest .a gang of j for its pains gathers boqueta of hliss, and 1 when their blossoms have faded, he finds himself in possession of a bunch of briers, which is all owing to a little incident which occurred in Paradise, when mnn was as green as a.tobacco worm, and.ns unsuspic- ious as a tree toad in a 'thunder He was told to increase and multiply, and so accordingly increased Ms'eares and peo- pled the world with a pareel'of candidates for and 1'arn one of them. MERCANTILE QUESTIONS ANT> ANS- is double entry ing tho same "What is single with poods, but riot crediting the cash he pays for .them.' What is to return borrowed.'volumes.; What is a counting-houae companionion upon which peoplo .often spend their entire fortune. What is an irilund draft wind.. What it-a foreign- of What is-a promissory: note c-i-' n'egotiable- could make eccentricity. The spinster, having a.lofty conception of the terror artd .majesty ...of the law, felt perfectly reassured by the presence of, ;the fictitious ofBcers, .and to' imagine that-no'banja could befall her or hers while he wa's in.the'.house... She him the spoons Were kep't, what doors locked, what bells 'belonged, to what rooms, and a variety of other details' which .not being very, iotcr- jbrgot.as jhe told him. the kitchen fire, with, a botUe.of inew; What did object to 'that sponsibUit j; upon iihe oc'onpantof thekitch- sleep. IJFsnVih'ad beenlfamiliar with( Tomy. it irpossibie by but his per- changed nimj-xand g jier nie.ce-i--wici-: .'en- the fictitious policeilfioer heard a rAn. Iriahmin named Pounder, was found in the Race last evening, dead either from drown ing or by pocket- book, waa: .found near iogold. He o- drinking in 'Beloit Journal, 1O" Gan. D. was more distinguished for gallantry in the field than for the Arc lie lav. islnd upon personal cleanliness- Complaining on certain occasion to tho Into Chief Justice U of tlie suffering he endured from rheuma tism, that learned and humorous 'Under- took to prescribe a remedy. "You must dosire your he eaid to the General, "to place every morning by your bedside Hub, .three parts filled with warm wa- ter. You will thea get into. the tub, sod, hav- ing previously provided youriclf with a pound of yellow soap, you must. rub your whole body with it, immersing yourself occasionally in the wnter, at the end of one-fourth of an liour, con- clude the process by wiping yoiireelf dry with towels and scrubbing your pcrion with a. flesh brtmu." said the Qcncril, after n fowminufes reflection upon what he had just heard, "this ecems to me to be nothing moro cor than wishing my self." rejoined the Judge, -'it in open to object ion." BEIGGS. Old deacon Bnggs ii is re- marknblo for his closeness as wns Dickins' mnn Barkis. Ono bitter cold morning, he bade the boys drive together all tne pig's tlmt were to be fattened for the market, into the little yard just at the corner of tho house. A pig was caught by one of the youngsters the Deacon, with a pair uf pincers in ouc.band and asharp knife in the other, seized the unfortunate pig by the tail and cut it off close up- So-on through the whole herd, leaving- not pig with cren-a stump of a tail. who1 'worked for his grandfather' stood by "in amazement hands in Jiin pock- his body wnrpeil into a crctccutby the cold, Snd his tceti jawing agaiurt tlic outrage with a-.prodigfous 'clatter. At l.'ist he stuttered out "Grmndpa 1 what nre you cuttingoff those tails .-._... Sober and solemn iris D'ccoh .Briggs at he re- plied "You will ntverbe a rich man, for you do not fcnow what is to be savin.' You ought to know, my child it takes BUSHEL or vff FAiriy AX ixcn OF TAit Cort haj gone to the iirthe. coro growing of Michignu, h'asi.takcu to the of tailless porkerx. Tni: GiiLsrot rorja MONCT. A Schoolmaster of.EddingtoD Me., recently cLcwing of guw jn-hii ichooli, .whereupon of the larger -boys rebelled, tnd attempted to. expel; him. Three aged from'.iC io'19, came to the rescue with ticks of" wood, in dri ring the anailanig out'of the The itruggle'.iraa a desperate7 one; and' liutod bjaJf .auj.hour..v'V-, -JMD: bearurund -Spabidi'. simple bavicg jlonri, but fev jind ac- cordingly it eMier to get into them than to CHIIAT an selling: Per .TfiATSAirm Omo who was the Marietta 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication