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Racine Daily Journal Newspaper Archive: April 6, 1903 - Page 7

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Publication: Racine Daily Journal

Location: Racine, Wisconsin

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   Racine Daily Journal (Newspaper) - April 6, 1903, Racine, Wisconsin                                BACrSTE DAILY MONDAY APRIL G, 1903. THREE LARGE YACHTS Being Built by the .Racine Boat Hanniactnring of Them lor England. The Bacine Boat Manufacturing com- pany in entering upon an era of unusual activity anil if present prospects can be taken us a criterion the present in boat manufacturing, begins with tlie opening of navigation of the will be the busiest in its his- tory. The demand for the company's product N stronger th.m liver, naturally making it follow that all departments of tlie plant imif-t be mn to the, fullest of its capacity. If the wave of prosperity any distance into the future, expansion of (lie, plant will have to be considered by tiii.s company. The conipuny was organized and began operations in tlie year of 1803. with men. and each following year has oon- tiilmled liberally to the trade and enterprise and no'.v 200 hands are needed for meeting the demand. Knoiixh work on hand to keep the fac- tory in operation for the next three anJ atill orders, among wliich arc many pressing ones, are, coming in fa.-t. Only today came a cablegram friiin their agent in Kngland desiring the immediate shipment of nine launches. The trade of the Racine Boat company extends to nearly every country on the England is the beat of the for- eign Held, because of John Bull's great fondues.- for aquatic sport. Two fifty- foot sea going crafts are now under con- struction for that country and orders are in view for five or six more such jobs for the trade across the Atlantic. At present the main work of the boat building crew is centered on three large yachts, the largest of which is the 73- footer for J. H. Moore, a Chicago stock broker, who will run the same on Lake Geneva, Wis., where he has a summer home. Work was commenced on. it in January last and the contract calls for its delivery on May first, shipment beinj; made by rail. The boat is of steel, the cabins of solid mahogany and is equipped a power tripple cxpension engine and water tube boilers. Its coat complete will be A fifty-foot yacht for a Mr. Xewman, of London, England, will also be ready for shipment May first H is to be used for pleasure purposes on the River Thames, North and along the coast of Knplnnd. The cabins are finished in butternut ami upholstered with red I'lnsh. The boat will be run by n 24- hurse power g-a-'oline engine, and will be nblo to maintain a speed of miles an hour. The coM will be Tne third of the larpp boats will be for a (inn in the inlands, which be- 1'jng to Portugal, where it is to serve owners ir. the bii-lr.e.-s of cntohimr flip will be -IS feet in length, twelve foot beam, equipped with 24-horip power gasoline engine, nnd will bo worth Hesides the foregoing rjit'ntioncd the company is building of the various styles of smaller craft. Tho steel steam yacht owr.ed by Mr. Morgan of Chicago, is the largest turned out hy the Racine .Boat rompany. lioinq- built in the year of ISOii. On her odleial trip she covered H4 miles in eight hours, against a heavy sea ar.d head wind. The length of the vessel is fret; beam IS1; feet. The machin- ery consists of a four-cylinder (ripple expansion engine. She is also provided wit n elect ru1 lights, telephone service and srnp-lilight. Her price is ELECTION NOTICE. For Sale OJTICE OF CODKTT CLEE-E. EACIBK, Wis., March 30, 1903. To THE ELECTORS or THE Cotnfrr or RACINE, WISCONSIN Notice ia hereby given that a Judicial election in to beheld in the several towns, wards and election precincts in the said Connty of Racine on tlie seventh day of Aptil 1903, at whicb the officers named below are to be chosen. The namea of the candidates for each office to be voted for, whose Dominations haye been certified to this office are given opposite the title of the office and under the appropriate party or other desig in its proper column, and the questions submitted bo a vote are stated below INFORMATION TO VOTERS. The following instructions are given for the information and guidance of voters: A voter upon entering the polling place, and giving his name and residence, will receive a ballot from the ballot clerk, which mast have endorsed thereon the namea or Initials of both ballot clerke, and no other ballot can be used. Upon receiving his ballot, the Toter moat retire, alone, to a booth or compartment, and prepare the same Cot voting. A ballot clerk may inform the voter as to the proper manner of marking a bnt he must not advise or indicate in any manner whom to vote for. The voter, if he wishes to vote ior all the candidates nominated by any party, should make a crooe mark X, nnder the party designation printed at the top of the ballot in the circle made for that purpose. A ballot so marked, and having no other mark, will be counted for all the candidates of that party in the column underneath, unless the names of some of the candidates of the party have been erased or a cross mark be placed in the square nnder the name or at any place in the space occupied by the name or OFFICE. of the Supreme Conrt. INDIVIDUAL NOMINATION. WILLIAM ETJGER................. Non-Parslan Judiciary. names of the candidates in another column, and will be counted for all Dimes written in Hen of the one erased. If the voter wilbea to vote for of the candidates of different political parties, he ahoold make a cross mark nnder the name of each candidate he dcsiree to vote for, or at any place within the apace in which the name in printed. If wishes to vote for a person for a certain office, whose name is not on the ballot, he must write the name in the blank ipaoe under the printed name of the candidate for the office. The ballot should not be marked in any other manner. If the ballot be spoiled, it mast be re- turned to the ballot clerk, who mnst issue another in ita stead, bat not more thin three in all to any one voter. Five minutes time ia allowed in booth to mark ballot. Unofficial ballots or memorandum to assist the voter in marking his billot can be taken into the booth and may be used to copy from. The ballot Bust not be shown 30 that any person can see how it has been marked by the voter. After it is marked, it should be folded so that the inside cannot be seen, but so that the printed endorsements and signatures of the ballot clerks on the outside may be seen. Then the voter should pass out of the booth, or compartment, give his name to the inspector in charge of the ballot box, hand him his ballot to be placed in the box, and pan ont of the voting place. A voter who declares to the presiding officer that he is unable to read, or that, by reason of physical disability, he is nnable to mark his Ballot, can have the assistance of one or two election officers ia the marking of the same, to be chosen by the voter. And if he declares that he ia totally blind, he may be assisted by any pergoni chosen by him from among the legal voters of the county. The presiding officer may administer an oath, in his discretion, to such person's disability. NEW HOUSES INDIVIDUAL NOMINATION. ROBEKT G. 8IEBECKBR........ Non-Parsian Judiciary. INDIVIDUAL NOMINATION. J. G. MORITZ WITTIG Equal Rights to All. On..... Asylum Avenue j Morton Avenue Grand Avenue Park Avenue Wisconsin Street Racine Street Seventeenth Street on my new plan of Decreasing Monthly Payments First Payments to Monthly Payments to Or if you have a lot I will build you a house and you can pay for it by monthly payments- SECTION 1. The chief justice and associate justices of the supreme court shall be severally known as the justices of said court, with the same terms of office of ten years respectively as now provided. The supreme court shall consist of seven justices, any four of whom shall be a quorum, to be elected as now provided, not more than one each year. The justice, baring been longest a continuous member of said court, or in case two or more sutA senior justices shall have served for the same'length of time, then the one whose commission first expires shall be ex-officio, the chief justice. YES NO Shall the Amendment to Section I, Article VII, of the Constitution be LOCATION OF POLLING BOOTHS. TOWNS Village of Union Grove, at Uyen Opera House. Mt. Pleasant, at Town Hall. Caledonia, at Town Hall. Raymond at Town EalL Torkville at Town Hall. Dover at Britdy's Hotel, Eagle Lsie. Norway at Blackhawk Comers. Waterford, at office of TOWH Clerk. Rochester, at Town Hall. Burlington at Town Hall in the City of Burlington.' Cirr or BURLINGTON. First Ward, Engine Room, City Hall. Second Ward, Engine Room. Hose Co. No. 2. Third Ward, Bnseherf n Wagon Shop. Fonrlh Ward, Council Chamber, City HalL CITY OF RACJNK. In the First Ward at the polling booth on Thitd Street In the North district of the Second Ward at the ward hall on Eighth Street, In the South district in the Second Ward at polling booth on 17th At., between Grand avenue and Villa street. In the JSorth district of Third Ward at pollinn booth on Grand are. NoriWof Stotlh St. In the South district of Third Ward at 1201 VlllH Street. In the East district of Fourth Ward at polling booth on Hnbbard Street, between North Main and North Wisconsin Streets. In the West District of Fourth Ward at engine bonne, cor. of Barker and Lincoln St. In the Fifth ward at polling booth on Monnd Avunue. In the North district of Sixth Ward at ward hall, Eighth st. between Mend and Barint .Streets. In the Central district of tbe Sixth ward at polling booth on Washington be- tween 13th and 14th streets. In the Sonth district of Sixth Ward at eneine house on Baoine Street. In the-East district of Seventh Ward, S. W. cor. N. Wis. and High atrcaK In the West District of Seventh Ward at palling booth No. 1661 Douglas ivMai. In the Eighth Ward at polling booth on Winelow Conrt. In the Ninth Ward at polling booth, cor Clancy aid West Street. The polls at said election will be open in the city of Bacine at 6 the nontax of said day of election and will bs closed at 7 o'clock in ths evening of tame day. In all other cities, vintages, towns and election precincts the county the polls will open at 9 a. m. and close at sundown, or p. m, WM. BELL, Csnnty Cleric. Bone Pains, Itching, Scabby Skin Diseases. IMmplpx, Scrofnln PiTrrmiifrr.lv i-nrt-rl by tnkir.p Botanic Hlooit Biilm. It destroys Chi1 active poi- son in lilood. I' you HLIVO ache? pain? ir, bark rtncl iolnts. Itching PciUihy Pl'.in. Blood fonts hot .ir thin. S-.volioti (.'.ifln.ln. Uisinjry ami Thumps on Ihf Skin. MtKM.i P.it.'hes in Month, Soro Throut. Pimples, or eruptions, Coppcr-CoIoi-oil gpot? or r.tFh on skin., all run-down, or nervous, on any part of the body. Hair or falling out Cnrbnnolrp or Botanic lilood Bnim, guaranteed to euro oven the woivt most doep- poated eases where patent modi- olr.es. and hot springs fall. Hoals all yoroe. all nr.'.l re-iUices r.'.l Fwn-lllncrs. bloml pure and rieh, completely tlu- entire into :i elenn. healthy condition. P.. H. hr.p cured thousands of enses of DIoo.l Poison ntter reaching the su-.trc-F. Old FheiiniBtlom, rntnrrh, Krr.emn are cruised by nn atvful poisoned comiitior of the Blood. B. B. H. stop? and Spitting. Itchir.s i Scrntehine. A.-hes nnd euros Ri-.s-umatism. C.-i. tarrh: hc-rjs all Scabs; Eruptions, Watery Blisters, foul fostering Sores of Kcsema: oy n pure, healthy bloort supply to afi'oetod parts. Cancer Cured Botanic Blood Balm Cure? Cancers of all Kinds. Suri'uratins" Swellings. E.itlnu TV.morp. L'lcers. li kills thc- Canccr Poison and heals the sores of worst cancer perfectly, if vou have a persistfnt Pimple. Swelling. Shoot- iner, Stinpir.p Pains, lake F.iood Balm and they will before "they de- velop into Cancer. Many apparently hope- less Vase? of cancrr cured by taking Bo- tanic Blood Bairn. Botonle Blooil nnlni (n.B.K.) is Pleasant and safe to take. TT.nroUjrhly Pllre CONDENSED NEWS NOTES The Bnlkan sitnntion is tcyonrt control with prospects of an immediate attack. A revolt in Albania has been planned by tin- Siilt.m. President Smith of the Mor- mon einirr'h tolls his followers to pro- parr for ;i period of financial depression. .liuljro (Jiossciip has ordered the beet trust to reply by April IS, or a failure to act will in a permanent injunc- tion. Secretary Shaw will not leave the cab- inet. Ileports of a disftpreompnt. with the pri'.-ident arc without foundation. Five thousand telephone and electrical workers are. trying to effect a settlement in their favor of a nine hour dny and rioognition of the union. The president's speech at Minneapolis referred to tlie tnrifT policy. No revis- ion of duties can elTeet the socnllcd trust problem. Changes should not be made until the need for thorn outwoijrhs t.ho. disnilvania.cre.s that may result. Tho tar- iff is a business proposition and our pol- icy should be sta.ble us it shmild be wise. Wo should, when industrial conditions demand from time to time adapt our economical policy according to the chanfred conditions. Radical tariff ohamros will injure small den.lers. The. main protection principle? mnst s'tttnd. Konoshn women will vote in large num- bers Tuesday on school mutters. The railroad and its employes have- adjusted their differences and no strike will result. AVith n license. Xow York sa- loons contemplate selling by weight in- stead of by measure. Infnntn Kulalic who visited 'this coun- try the lime of the World's fair ami who was a guoM of the nation, has n fruitless appeal to the Pope for a di- voreo from her husband, the duke of lioni'. The bubonic plague has already result- ed ill thr donihs of 100.000 inlr.-.hUan'ts of the Vuniah nnd other Indian provinces. Mnior of the Rock ar- senal in his oflicinl report, plead? for the nrmy post exchange as heing in the inter- est? of discipline and sobriety. Western Xortli Cnrolinn, in the Western Xorth Carolina is nlfvnctive at any season of the year, liut certainly during the spring months, when the trees arc budding, nnd the flowers blos- soming, what, could be more invif.ing than a. trip to this beautiful inouutnin coun- try. The months of April and May in the Land of iho Sky and Sapphire Country ine'.uding Asheville and Hot Springs, N. 0.. aro very enjoyable. Tho. climate at this season is delightful, the scenery most beautiful and the opportunities for the enjoyment of sport, including golf, cannot be snrpas-ed. The hotels in this region afford the very best accommodations. If you wish to know snme'ihing of this delightful reg- ion, communicate with yonr nearest ticket, agent, or address J. K. McCullnnph, X. W. r. A. Southern R'y., 225 Dearborn street, Chicago. 111. G.'li. Allen, A. G. T. A., St. Louis. Mo. CHKONEC BRONCHITIS CURED. "For ten years T had chronic bronchitis :3o bad that at times I could not speak above n writes Mr. Joseph nmu. of Montmoreuei, Tnd. "I iriod all remedies available, hut with no success. my employer suffgt-sted tliat I try Foley'a Money and Tar. Its effect wnp almost miraculous, and I am now cured of the disease. On my recommenda- tion many people hove used Ko'ev's Hon- ey and Tar. and always with satisfac- tion." Kradwell-Thlesen Druf? Co. TI tbe Bnhr Cutting Teetli. Bo 
                            

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